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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #60 on: July 18, 2014, 04:18:18 PM »
Also, some notes I typed up:

Compressed Burlesque is rather conventional compared to my work of the past two years. It has a pretty small pool of basic materials and fewer diversions than I usually allow. The opening chord sequence is frequently repeated in various guises, ranging from a 5/8 riff (first appearing at 0'16") to a sort of cheesy '80s pop/rock progression (2'00" - 2'20"). After the '80s section, the piece appears to break down and go off on a tangent, what actually occurs here is the opening violin melody inverted on the piano, then played backwards with the 5/8 riff on top of it, while the violin provides a sort of percussive pizzicato following the rhythms of both the melody and the riff.

The second theme on the violin is the second most common element after the opening chord sequence. It appears in many mutations, which were developed in reverse order to how they appear in the piece, and the first appearance starting at 0'42" is actually the final development. In the '80s section, this melody is related to the first version of the second theme appearing at 3'02", but is combined with the piano part in that section also, then tapered to fit the '80s progression.

The main diversions are the slow waltz at 1'09" and the section from 2'55" - 3'01". Neither of these really has anything to do with the rest of the piece, they were just things that intuitively fit the moment for me, although the latter is kind of a play on the "burlesque" idea, a sort of sideways nod to the American burlesque while the rest of the piece concerns more the original meaning. Speaking of which, what's the subject of this burlesque? Various things, but in the main I had this kind of mutated version of Stravinsky's Violin Concerto in my head, and the first violin melody made me think of Jimmy Buffet for some reason, even though this sounds nothing like the gloriously titled Cheeseburger in Paradise or any other songs of his that I'm aware of. In general, the piece does not have much of anything in common with its inspirations, but the title still seemed to make sense to me.

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Offline Zentic Lord

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #61 on: July 18, 2014, 11:18:38 PM »
Zentifically speaking, this music makes about as much sense as an Andy Warhorse movie.

Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #62 on: July 19, 2014, 04:22:53 PM »
Stream on Soundcloud

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

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Offline jroa

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #63 on: July 24, 2014, 08:45:40 AM »
Stream on Soundcloud

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

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Offline Snupes

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #64 on: July 24, 2014, 11:17:30 AM »
Quote from: garygreen date=1480782226
i also took an online quiz that said i was a giraffe.  and i guess you're dumb enough to believe that i must be because the internet said so.

Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #65 on: July 24, 2014, 08:16:32 PM »
Stream on Soundcloud

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

NO NOT BURNED THE GRAMMAR IN THE SENTENCE CLEARLY INDICATED I HAVE HAD SEX AT LEAST ONCE TWICE IF YOU COUNT FINGERING

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Offline Particle Person

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #66 on: July 25, 2014, 12:39:35 AM »
Stream on Soundcloud

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

NO NOT BURNED THE GRAMMAR IN THE SENTENCE CLEARLY INDICATED I HAVE HAD SEX AT LEAST ONCE TWICE IF YOU COUNT FINGERING

wikimedia.com/list_of_burned_centers
Your mom is when your mom and you arent your mom.

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Offline Foxbox

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #67 on: August 04, 2014, 10:05:48 AM »
Parsifal: Oat

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #68 on: September 08, 2014, 02:27:54 AM »
Greeb groogley doogley, it's Male Goat Odes! What? Yes, really, it is! And you too can join in the fun by clicking one of the links below as suits your personal preference, which is always nice. Witness the mighty theorbo in Pythagorean tuning! See the clarinet do a thing real fast! All this and more, only in Male Goat Odes!

mp3

FLAC

Stream on SoundCloud

Burp.

P.S.: SoundCloud sucks, I encourage you to actually download the mp3 or FLAC to hear it properly.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2014, 02:30:17 AM by Crudblud »

Saddam Hussein

Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #69 on: September 08, 2014, 02:53:01 AM »
A delightful listen.  I don't quite know what it was about, but it was great anyway.

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Offline Snupes

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #70 on: September 08, 2014, 03:40:26 AM »
That was indeed very good. As you all know from extensive reading of my reviews, I am not very good at reviewing music, so I don't know a whole lot more to say than that. I'm particularly doubleplus ungood at reviewing more "classical" (feel free to berate my mislabeling of stuff) pieces like this because you're almost my only experience with it, but yeah. I loved the part around 11:38 - 11:50 because I am weird and like screechy weird stuff.
Quote from: garygreen date=1480782226
i also took an online quiz that said i was a giraffe.  and i guess you're dumb enough to believe that i must be because the internet said so.

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #71 on: September 08, 2014, 12:37:14 PM »
Thanks guys!

Oh by the way, motherfucking Oat!

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Offline Foxbox

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #72 on: October 03, 2014, 07:28:56 PM »
By the way people, Oat is fucking great.



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Offline beardo

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #73 on: October 03, 2014, 07:30:30 PM »
Will it cure my knee-ache?
The Mastery.

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Offline jroa

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #74 on: October 07, 2014, 03:47:00 PM »
Will it cure my knee-ache?

Only the power of Oden can do that. 

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Offline beardo

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #75 on: October 07, 2014, 04:15:52 PM »
Will it cure my knee-ache?

Only the power of Oden can do that. 
Wrong. Oat cured my knee-ache.
The Mastery.

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #76 on: February 03, 2015, 12:14:15 PM »
Recently I finished writing a short article relevant to my own work that I thought I would share here. I will have new music out this year, but the major project is quite large and complex, so it might be another month or more before it is finished. Please bear with me.

THE COMPUTER AS MUSICIAN

Computers have been used in music for over half a century now, from RCA's room-filling monstrosities to the Synclavier's tapeless studio and finally the common PC, yet, even with steadily growing acceptance in both “serious” and popular music, there remains a cumbersome taboo against these complex and awesome machines and the artists who use them. Consider the bedroom hip-hop producer: sat on their bed, hunched over a laptop, Beats by Dr Dre plastered to one ear in goofy approximation of the Hollywood record company exec, ctrl+v'ing ad nauseam the same block of MIDI data across a vast stretch of FL Studio sequencer space, selling for £5 apiece the fruits of their non-labour. This largely invented reality suits with uncanny convenience the view of a great many people who simply refuse to believe that effort ever should or even could be expended in the production of the dreaded, filthy, depraved and seriously unhealthy computer music.

“Computer music.” Let's think about that term for a moment. What does it mean, exactly? There are a handful of artificially intelligent composers operating at the time of writing, each of them developing their own musical environments through action and reaction based on algorithms. Unlike chess, where this algorithmic approach has resulted in many grandmaster level AIs, music composition is an essentially free process, there are no rules in any given piece which the composer has not chosen for themselves or at least agreed to follow, but the AI composer has no choice, their rules are chosen for them and they comply only because they have as little control over their material as over the specifications of their hardware. That is computer music: an interdisciplinary study combining artificial intelligence and music composition, where the musical output is the product of prescribed formulae within a highly limited mathematical framework. However, what is most commonly meant by “computer music” is the composition or production of music using the MIDI system, usually through a (semi-)dedicated frontend like the aforementioned FL Studio, Steinberg Cubase, Propellerhead Reason, their ancestor MUSIC (Max Matthews, Bell Labs) etc. and that the composer is a slave to this system, being afforded only slightly more control than I entertained of our artificial counterparts. This is not the truth of MIDI, as I will discuss below, but for now let's clear up the nomenclature a little: rather than “computer music,” I call what I do “computer rendered composition,” not the catchiest of phrases in the terminology book, but preferable at least to having one's work lumped in with the output of the Iamus cluster.

In computer rendered composition, the composer takes on simultaneously the responsibility of conductor, that is to say they write the music and shape the performance at the same time. This is something of an alien concept even to people who work largely with computers in lieu of a Mendelssohnian personal orchestra to torture with every half-realised, overly ambitious and ham-fisted sonic nightmare that pops into their head; they haven't yet become aware that they are writing for a different breed of musician, one that does exactly what it is told, necessitating a different approach to composition. This oblivion state manifests itself in the form of many interesting and generally deplorable phenomena, popular examples include the teenager who doesn't know, doesn't care, dreams of being the next John Williams and is armed with oh-so-cinematic “hit the button and watch it go” tools like Symphobia, and also the serious composer labouring over some dreadful ersatz Mozart in Finale. The latter example brings to mind a quote from Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot: “there's man all over for you, blaming on his boots the faults of his feet.” I am of course referring to the oft made excuse “it's the MIDI rendering, not me” which is forthcoming when the composer is confronted with criticisms of the dreaded “sounds like a metronome” or indeed any other variety, yet this will always be the fault of the composer for not realising the extra responsibilities involved in seeing a computer rendered piece to its conclusion.

The hordes of reactionary music students who want to go back in time a few hundred years while remaining exactly when they are, do not get along well with computers, which for them are relegated to the lowly position of scorewriter, and there is understandably an annoyance approaching and sometimes exceeding rage at these damnable machines that play everything metronomically as if music were a kind of temporal marksmanship. We play for peace and harmony, man, the piano is not a machine gun.  But the computer's just following orders, brother, and getting your mood ring back to a mellow yellow is as simple as issuing the right orders in the right way. Severely clumsy references to the good old days in which I never lived aside, MIDI is a rich language of near infinite potential for use in music creation, whether on its own or in an augmented unit with acoustic and electric instruments and, perhaps best of all, requires no thousand page densely worded textbooks or years of tutelage to learn. Anti-intellectual? Perhaps, but then what exactly is intellectual about music in the first place? At some point one has to confront the fact that music is the most open of all art forms, where the intellectual aspects are optional at best, and the potential for intuitive development is limitless. Of course, there are many theoretical systems for the organisation of all aspects of music to which the composer can choose to adhere, and collected into the field of music theory they offer up a grand academic pursuit for many scholars, but these are far from the be all and end all of musical thought no matter if one is taking pen to paper or mouse pointer to sequencer.

The main goal of this short essay has been to encourage you, no matter what kind of music you make or might be interested in making, to explore the potential of computer technology in your work, to embrace its vastness of application regardless of past experiences, prejudices and misconceptions, and perhaps most importantly to avoid viewing the world of music as one of clichés and binary extremes. At no point would I suggest computer rendered composition as the singularity to which all musical progress leads, nor that anyone should believe they must necessarily go to it. The dogma of Darmstadt is long done and dusted, the composer finally free to pursue their interests without ideological persecution, yet it is only through exploration of ideas, both those that inspire enthusiasm and those that inspire reticence, that we develop and grow as composers. I believe the computer musician needs more advocates, and that maybe, just maybe, you can help it out. So, if you're reading this, please spare a thought for the metal box humming away to itself atop your desk, it's good for more than just checking your e-mail and watching YouTube.
 

FURTHER LISTENING
This is not intended to be a comprehensive or objective list. All selections are either fully or largely computer rendered, or feature a significant computer rendered element. In square brackets I have noted the technology and/or facility used.

Milton Babbitt - Occasional Variations (1971) [RCA Mark II, Princeton EMC]
Pierre Boulez - ...explosante-fixe... (1993) [MIDI, IRCAM]*
Hans Edler - Elektron Kukéso (1971) [Elektronmusikstudio Stockholm]**
Jonathan Harvey - Mortuos Plango Vivos Voco (1980) [MUSIC-N, IRCAM]
Charles Wuorinen - Time's Encomium (1969) [RCA Mark II, Princeton EMC]
Frank Zappa - Civilization Phaze III (1993) [Synclavier, UMRK]

Note: I use the terms “serious music” and “popular music” only for the purpose of distinction between what I feel are the two supergeneric schools of thought in our time.

*MIDI rendered flute plus acoustic instruments
**Made using a computer which was full of bugs and produced unpredictable results. This was supposed to be a hit pop record but ended up being something quite different.

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Offline spoon

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #77 on: February 03, 2015, 02:06:45 PM »
Love the article
inb4 Blanko spoons a literally pizza

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #78 on: February 03, 2015, 03:07:46 PM »

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Cazazza Dan
« Reply #79 on: March 03, 2015, 10:59:24 PM »
And now, the one Saddam has been waiting for! It's Table Arias, which is what happens when you ask me to make dadrock. The liner notes contain lore specially written for the Sadman himself.

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