The Flat Earth Society

Other Discussion Boards => Arts & Entertainment => Topic started by: Crudblud on December 12, 2013, 07:23:42 PM

Title: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on December 12, 2013, 07:23:42 PM
I make music and stuff and in this thread I'm going to post about it and you can make fun of me or whatever it is you want to do. On the old FES I used to make a new thread for every release, but this time around I've decided to just do a general thread and bump it with fresh content when it's ready to go.

Back Catalogue (anything I had posted on FES previously; will be updated with each new release)

Sailin' Tuns! (2012) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE18_Sailin_Tuns_2012.zip)
Hello (2012) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE19_Hello_2012.zip)
Salami XIII (2013) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE20_Salami%20XIII_2013.zip)
Night Music (2013) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE21_Night_Music_2013.zip)
Frozen Bob's Estranged Wife (2013) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE22_Frozen_Bob%27s_Estranged_Wife_2013.zip)
Emergent (2013) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE23_Emergent_2013.zip)
Urgynes (2014) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDA13_Urgynes_2014.zip)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on December 12, 2013, 07:24:54 PM
And here's a fresh one right now (yes, I was waiting until it was ready to start this thread).

Emergent (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE23_Emergent_2013.zip)

Piece for Cristal Baschet, two Ondes Martenot, steel drums and Cloud Chamber Bowls.

Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Pete Svarrior on December 12, 2013, 09:16:58 PM
And here's a fresh one right now (yes, I was waiting until it was ready to start this thread).

Emergent (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE23_Emergent_2013.zip)

Piece for Cristal Baschet, two Ondes Martenot, steel drums and Cloud Chamber Bowls.

Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)
Most respectable, good sir.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: spoon on December 12, 2013, 11:13:14 PM
What, my thread's not good enough for you?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on December 13, 2013, 04:03:04 AM
What, my thread's not good enough for you?
I tend to release more regularly than anyone else here, it seemed like I would draw too much attention away from others if I post an average of four releases a year where they maybe post one or less, so thought it best to start my own thread.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on December 14, 2013, 08:15:00 AM
Emergent feels to me like a work of science fiction. It is a very mysterious, atmospheric piece, giving off almost unsettling feelings at times. To me, the piece seems to have a mind of its own, never letting me become too familiar with it, which consider a great thing. It fills my mind with images of many weird, wonderful things. It certainly makes for a fantastic listening experience. I can say now that Emergent has definitely replaced Frozen Bob’s Estranged Wife as my favorite Cazazza Dan work.

Keep up the great work, Crudblud, I look forward to hearing what you give us next.



Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 10, 2014, 01:23:01 AM
Well, what I'm giving you next is...

Just under 35 minutes of music for piano, cello and accordion in five parts. Each part has its own 12-tone matrix (except for the fourth, which has two) but their use is not strict in any way, rather, by applying patterns, shapes, directions and other truncations/filters, I use them to generate material which is then combined with free writing. The extent to which the row underpins the music in a given part varies, but overall there is an even balance, and I employ many techniques which take serially generated material and transform it into something completely different.

You can download the whole thing here (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDA13_Urgynes_2014.zip)

Or stream the first part here (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/lines-for-twelve-played-by)

If you listen, I hope you enjoy it, and please feel free to ask any questions about the music that might be on your mind.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on February 10, 2014, 02:54:19 AM
Cazazza Dan does it again! Urgynes is fantastic, and one hell of a listening experience. Good work Crudblud, I enjoyed this one a lot.
Everyone should download this and give it a listen.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 10, 2014, 03:13:42 AM
Each part has its own 12-tone matrix (except for the fourth, which has two) but their use is not strict in any way, rather, by applying patterns, shapes, directions and other truncations/filters, I use them to generate material which is then combined with free writing. The extent to which the row underpins the music in a given part varies, but overall there is an even balance, and I employ many techniques which take serially generated material and transform it into something completely different.

How very Rawlsian of you.

The music is gud, though.  I'm sure I've asked you this before, but what other instruments do you play?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 10, 2014, 03:35:27 AM
@Foxy: Excellent! Thank you!

@Saddam: Guitar and alto sax are my mains, the latter allows for pretty easy doubling on clarinet, I also play mandolin, recorder and some other stuff. I have some instruments I completely suck at too, like the trumpet, for which my technique is absolutely diabolical.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Blanko on February 10, 2014, 04:33:46 AM
When's Oat?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 10, 2014, 04:53:33 AM
When's Oat?
It will not be too long before Oat. Don't worry.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 11, 2014, 11:49:57 PM
Cazazza Dan does it again! Urgynes is fantastic, and one hell of a listening experience. Good work Crudblud, I enjoyed this one a lot.
Everyone should download this and give it a listen.
Thank you Laura Palmer! Unfortunately your praise falls on deaf ears, only a very small few is bothering to listen so far, but I really appreciate your kind words nonetheless.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 14, 2014, 09:42:31 AM
Applications of serial pitch organisation in Urgynes (taken from another forum)

(http://i.imgur.com/TKi9Yin.png)

The numbers along the outside detail the Prime and Inverse rows, so when I say "P11" I'm referring to the 0 at the very start of the matrix, when I say "I25" I'm referring to the 7 which is the second interval in P5.

From that matrix, or grid, there are endless possibilities for generating material. What I did, in addition to simply following a row in a straightforward manner, was to apply various patterns and shapes and non-standard (e.g.: diagonal) directions to movements about the grid, sometimes I would even jump from one instance of a number to another somewhere else (e.g.: reaching the 8 at P12 and jumping to the 8 at P39 and continuing in any direction). Deriving material in this way became a game, and I was often devising different rules for getting from one end of the board to the other and seeing what the resulting melodies, harmonies, chords etc. were, and naturally I would alter or discard the results I was not pleased with.

One technique I used throughout the piece was to apply shapes to the matrix, and the portions of the matrix above highlighted in bold red resemble a particular division I used in the very first movement; two large isosceles triangles from P61 to P127 and I61 to I127. Within these triangles I used all my other techniques to generate more limited melodic material while I derived chords from the space in between them. In the final movement I used isosceles triangles again, this time to form eight equal divisions of the matrix which operated independently of each other.

Of course, the whole time I was combining all of this serially derived material with free writing and applying transformative techniques independently of the matrix. So ultimately my work was not serial in the strict sense, the matrix was only one tool of many used to reach the end result. I did not apply any complex mathematical processes to the matrix, certainly nothing like Set Theory, which I must confess I do not understand, so for me at least working with serialism was nothing close to an algorithmic kind of composition.

In response to further questions about construction and uses of rows/matrices in the piece

Each row was constructed differently, sometimes I wanted particular intervals to be emphasised, but some were almost created blindly. This row in particular is the most extreme example of doing it blind, I just asked friends in an IRC chatroom to call out numbers between 0 and 11 and wrote them in the order they came up, ignoring repeat numbers. If it had moved a little too predictably I would have scrapped it, but as it came out it seemed pretty interesting on paper. Initially I was not too happy working with it, however, so for most of the second movement I completely ignored it, but then I had something of an epiphany as I was working it back into the ending, then I went back and reset a lot of the material using the matrix as a guide and it sounded a lot better, more unified. So that one in particular was a case of having to get away from the row to write the music and then coming back to it later on. If I had rewritten the row, the movement would have become far too laborious a working process, and I think the end result would have suffered because of that.

The construction of the matrix itself is quite simple, all you need to do is invert the prime row to create the inverse row, then use each interval in the inverse row as the beginning of a transposed prime row. In that matrix I12 is 4, so P2 is the prime row transposed up two whole steps. The rest falls into place the same way: P3 is P1+9 half steps, P4 is P1+ 5 and so on until the entire thing is filled out. Every 12-tone matrix is crawling with patterns, whether intentional or accidental, just take a look at those two red triangles on the example I posted, notice how they are diagonal inversions of each other. P1-6 to P712 (10, 10, 11, 9, 10, 7, 3) is I61 to I127 (2, 2, 1, 3, 2, 5, 9) inverted, the same is true of all those left-to-right diagonal lines. The right-to-left diagonal lines offer up some interesting prospects as well: I8 to P8 is 2, 10, 7, 6 followed by its own retrograde inversion 6, 5, 2, 10, and the same is true of all diagonals in that direction. Simply put, using the left-to-right line of 0s as a dividing line, the left side is the inverse of the right. There are lots of other recurring figures, in this one the relationship between 7 and 3 is strongly emphasised, in most instances you can find a 3 right next to a 7, whether straight or diagonally. I think it's an exciting feature of the 12-tone matrix, the way patterns inevitably emerge, recur, invert and transpose each other etc.

Awareness of the results one will get from a matrix, that's something Milton Babbitt talked about, I think in the documentary Portrait of a Serial Composer, and he's lamenting composition students trying to use serial techniques without considering the musical outcome of the rows they create, their lack of understanding means they end up scrapping a lot of unsatisfactory pieces. Of course, Babbitt was very strict in his application of serial organisation, to the extent that the piece was determined by the rows before it was composed (if he was answering [the] question about patterns, I have no doubt he would talk about planning them out meticulously when he constructs a row), so when he talks about that awareness it is within the context of strict application, my applications are much looser and do not underpin the entire work so much as supplement it. Each movement begins with an exploration of the row but is soon enough suffused with free writing, so the construction of the row itself is not so important as the application from then on, but even in those initial explorations the vertical spacing and ordering of the notes makes all the difference, some sections will benefit from a more lyrical treatment while others will require large leaps from one register to another and so on.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on February 14, 2014, 10:24:30 AM
tl;dr
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 14, 2014, 01:55:44 PM
http://www.talkclassical.com/30559-urgynes.html

It's a forum full of sophisticated classical music fans.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 14, 2014, 02:40:14 PM
http://www.talkclassical.com/30559-urgynes.html

It's a forum full of sophisticated classical music fans.

o no i feel so pretentious now

But yeah, that's the source. I just thought it would be interesting to see if anyone would even be interested in reading it here.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: spoon on February 14, 2014, 11:14:52 PM
Urgynes was even better on the second listen through.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 03:51:50 AM
Applications of serial pitch organisation in Urgynes (taken from another forum)

(http://i.imgur.com/TKi9Yin.png)

The numbers along the outside detail the Prime and Inverse rows, so when I say "P11" I'm referring to the 0 at the very start of the matrix, when I say "I25" I'm referring to the 7 which is the second interval in P5.

From that matrix, or grid, there are endless possibilities for generating material. What I did, in addition to simply following a row in a straightforward manner, was to apply various patterns and shapes and non-standard (e.g.: diagonal) directions to movements about the grid, sometimes I would even jump from one instance of a number to another somewhere else (e.g.: reaching the 8 at P12 and jumping to the 8 at P39 and continuing in any direction). Deriving material in this way became a game, and I was often devising different rules for getting from one end of the board to the other and seeing what the resulting melodies, harmonies, chords etc. were, and naturally I would alter or discard the results I was not pleased with.

One technique I used throughout the piece was to apply shapes to the matrix, and the portions of the matrix above highlighted in bold red resemble a particular division I used in the very first movement; two large isosceles triangles from P61 to P127 and I61 to I127. Within these triangles I used all my other techniques to generate more limited melodic material while I derived chords from the space in between them. In the final movement I used isosceles triangles again, this time to form eight equal divisions of the matrix which operated independently of each other.

Of course, the whole time I was combining all of this serially derived material with free writing and applying transformative techniques independently of the matrix. So ultimately my work was not serial in the strict sense, the matrix was only one tool of many used to reach the end result. I did not apply any complex mathematical processes to the matrix, certainly nothing like Set Theory, which I must confess I do not understand, so for me at least working with serialism was nothing close to an algorithmic kind of composition.

In response to further questions about construction and uses of rows/matrices in the piece

Each row was constructed differently, sometimes I wanted particular intervals to be emphasised, but some were almost created blindly. This row in particular is the most extreme example of doing it blind, I just asked friends in an IRC chatroom to call out numbers between 0 and 11 and wrote them in the order they came up, ignoring repeat numbers. If it had moved a little too predictably I would have scrapped it, but as it came out it seemed pretty interesting on paper. Initially I was not too happy working with it, however, so for most of the second movement I completely ignored it, but then I had something of an epiphany as I was working it back into the ending, then I went back and reset a lot of the material using the matrix as a guide and it sounded a lot better, more unified. So that one in particular was a case of having to get away from the row to write the music and then coming back to it later on. If I had rewritten the row, the movement would have become far too laborious a working process, and I think the end result would have suffered because of that.

The construction of the matrix itself is quite simple, all you need to do is invert the prime row to create the inverse row, then use each interval in the inverse row as the beginning of a transposed prime row. In that matrix I12 is 4, so P2 is the prime row transposed up two whole steps. The rest falls into place the same way: P3 is P1+9 half steps, P4 is P1+ 5 and so on until the entire thing is filled out. Every 12-tone matrix is crawling with patterns, whether intentional or accidental, just take a look at those two red triangles on the example I posted, notice how they are diagonal inversions of each other. P1-6 to P712 (10, 10, 11, 9, 10, 7, 3) is I61 to I127 (2, 2, 1, 3, 2, 5, 9) inverted, the same is true of all those left-to-right diagonal lines. The right-to-left diagonal lines offer up some interesting prospects as well: I8 to P8 is 2, 10, 7, 6 followed by its own retrograde inversion 6, 5, 2, 10, and the same is true of all diagonals in that direction. Simply put, using the left-to-right line of 0s as a dividing line, the left side is the inverse of the right. There are lots of other recurring figures, in this one the relationship between 7 and 3 is strongly emphasised, in most instances you can find a 3 right next to a 7, whether straight or diagonally. I think it's an exciting feature of the 12-tone matrix, the way patterns inevitably emerge, recur, invert and transpose each other etc.

Awareness of the results one will get from a matrix, that's something Milton Babbitt talked about, I think in the documentary Portrait of a Serial Composer, and he's lamenting composition students trying to use serial techniques without considering the musical outcome of the rows they create, their lack of understanding means they end up scrapping a lot of unsatisfactory pieces. Of course, Babbitt was very strict in his application of serial organisation, to the extent that the piece was determined by the rows before it was composed (if he was answering [the] question about patterns, I have no doubt he would talk about planning them out meticulously when he constructs a row), so when he talks about that awareness it is within the context of strict application, my applications are much looser and do not underpin the entire work so much as supplement it. Each movement begins with an exploration of the row but is soon enough suffused with free writing, so the construction of the row itself is not so important as the application from then on, but even in those initial explorations the vertical spacing and ordering of the notes makes all the difference, some sections will benefit from a more lyrical treatment while others will require large leaps from one register to another and so on.

Who actually wrote the Beatles music?

The person who actually wrote all the Beatles songs was Theodor Adorno, a music professor from Frankfurt University. And none of the songs were original, Adorno, a genius on the subject of theoretical music cleverly adapted well-known classical partitures, to create the Beatles songs.

Here are some examples...

Yellow Submarine is actually the theme from Verdi's Aida combined the Toreador song from Carmen by Bizet.

Can't buy me love is actually Aine Kleine Nacht Musik by Mozart, ingeniously modified.

Penny Lane is the Elvira Madigan Piano Concerto No. 21 by Mozart, modified.

From me to you is the Peer Gynt suite, Morning Mood, by E. Grieg

I want to hold your hand is a modified From me to you (listen carefully and compare the two songs)

Yesterday is a modified Neapolitan song, called "Piccere' Che Vene a Dicere"

Let us remember that the original J. Lennon/P. McCartney duo could neither write nor read music; in the period 1960-1962 they sang only cover songs, and manifested no music writing talent whatsoever

Got to get into my life is a modified Can't buy me love

I feel fine is actually Fire Dance by M. de Falla

Martha my Dear is a modified classical song, Martha by von Flotow (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnQCD1_pj7w )

Something is nothing more than the theme from Spartacus by Khachaturian

For Hey Jude, Adorno pulled out all stops, he grouped into one song, masterfully, the Ride of the Walkiries by Wagner, the theme from the Piano Concerto no. 1 by Tchaikovsky, and the theme from Symphony no 9 by Beethoven

Blackbird is actually the Hungarian Fantasy by Liszt

Get Back is Obladi Oblada modified

Sgt. Pepper is clever combination of the Radetzky March and the Romanian rhapsody no 1 by Enescu

And Adorno reworked some of the Beatles songs to create others: She Loves You is a modified From Me to You, as is You're gonna lose that girl

A Hard Day's Night is a modified Mozart serenade

Ballad of John and Yoko is a modified And Your Bird can Sing


Theodor Adorno (seen here: http://www.nndb.com/people/754/000026676/adorno.gif ) also wrote the entire British invasion: that is, the music of the Rolling Stones, Kinks, the Who, See Emily Play by Pink Floyd, and also Moody Blues' Days of Future Past (Nights in white satin is a modified theme from Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky), the songs for Mamas and the Papas, Doors, Jimi Hendrix, Crosby Stills and Nash, Iron Butterfly (Adorno wrote In a gadda da vida), Cream, Queen (We are the Champions, a modified Hey Jude, and Seaside Rendezvous, a modified Martha my Dear).

John Coleman actually discovered that Adorno owned the Beatles catalogue, from 1962 until his death in August 1969, and that he invented the heavy metal/punk styles of music.

The first five Led Zeppelin albums were also written by Adorno (he wrote music extensively, borrowing from Beatles songs and other, from 1964 to 1969); the Rain Song is a modified Something (that is the theme from Spartacus by Khachaturian), see the thieving magpies google search details.

The music for Jethro Tull (the early albums, including Aqualung and Thick as a Brick) were also written years ahead by Adorno, as was the Machine Head album by Deep Purple (Highway Star is a modified Magical Mystery Tour song).

The best B. Sabbath songs, Spiral Architect and She's Gone were also among the songs written for them by Adorno (copies of She's Leaving Home and the Rain Song).

Upon leaving the Featles project (1967-1969), Fohn Lennon was given some songs written also by Adorno to continue a possible solo carrier: Imagine, Bless You, Mind Games (a modified All You Need is Love).

F. McCartney was given more songs, but not enough to compare disasters like Ram to the Beatles albums: Another Day, Maybe Im Amazed (a modified Long and winding Road), My Love (a modified All my Loving), Live and Let Die (a modified Magical Mystery Tour), Admiral Holsy (the best post Beatles song by McCartney, that is, by Adorno) and some others.

F. Harrison was given Dark Horse (a modified Gallows Pole by Adorno, who was inspired from black soul music), What is Love (a modified Satisfaction), and What is Life, not to mention My Sweet Lord (which Adorno copied from some early sixties music, and got Harrison into plagiarism trouble).

The Rolling Stones music was written by Adorno, as I have mentioned already: Satisfaction is a modified Ticket to Ride, Lady Jane is a modified Norwegian Wood, Jumpin Jack Flash is a modified Satisfaction, and so on...

The Beach Boys were also created musically by Adorno, who wrote the entire Pet Sounds album, God only Knows (a modified Michelle), Sloop John B (a modified Eight Days a Week), and later California Girls...

Here is an interview with Adorno:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd7Fhaji8ow

Adorno was a master at adapting classical music to suit his own purposes, that is, the institute which hired him to social engineer the entire 60s and 70s.

On the complexity of the Beatles songs:

http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/VOLUME01/A_Beatles_Odyssey.shtml
http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.shtml

And, all of the ABBA songs are nothing more than modified Beatles songs:

Dum Dum Diddle is a modified Obladi Oblada

Voulez Vous is Hello Goodbye all over again

Rock Me is actually a copied With a Little Help from My Friends

Dancing Queen is a modified Goodnight (from the White Album)

Mamma Mia is a modified Penny Lane

SOS is a modified Here Comes the Sun

Money Money Money is a modified Sgt. Pepper

Move on is a modified Blackbird

Take a chance on me is a modified We can Work it out (which is a modified Help)

Dance while the music still goes on is a modified I Saw Her Standing Her (borrowed by Adorno from one of Mozart's serenades)

Chiquitita is Michelle all over again

Eagle is a modified Maybe Im Amazed

Waterloo is a modified A Hard Days Night

Prior to 1972 both B. Anderson and B. Ulvaeus manifested no musical talent whatsoever (that is, at composing songs), all of a sudden, beginning with 1972, they came up, unexplicably, with a Mozart genius-like talent at writing songs, which expired suddenly in 1979.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Rama Set on February 15, 2014, 05:05:46 AM
Sandokhan does music.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 15, 2014, 06:10:07 AM
Sandokhan does music.
No, what I'm talking about actually makes sense.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Rama Set on February 15, 2014, 11:33:19 AM
Sandokhan does music.
No, what I'm talking about actually makes sense.

I meant Sandokhan Hussein.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 02:51:08 PM
Sandokhan does music.
No, what I'm talking about actually makes sense.

Most of us would probably have an easier time interpreting levee's crap than whatever the hell you were just talking about with matrices or whatever.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Blanko on February 15, 2014, 03:02:06 PM
Sandokhan does music.
No, what I'm talking about actually makes sense.

Most of us would probably have an easier time interpreting levee's crap than whatever the hell you were just talking about with matrices or whatever.

Most of us, when faced with concepts we fail to comprehend, would probably choose not to demonstrate our lack of intelligence.

It's admirable how little you care what people think of you, though.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 03:16:39 PM
Not understanding that does not in any way indicate a lack of intelligence.  Don't be a Parsifal.  Also, you didn't understand it either.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Blanko on February 15, 2014, 03:18:50 PM
Desperate, aren't you.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Parsifal on February 15, 2014, 03:23:55 PM
I just listened to Urgynes. It is great, especially parts 2 and 5. It exceeded even my high expectations of Crudblud's work; my only wish is that he had sent it to me for application of sea prior to release.

I will probably be sampling parts of this release whenever I get around to making some of my own music again. You should listen to it.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 03:32:46 PM
I will probably be sampling parts of this release whenever I get around to making some of my own music again.

Did you ask permission?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Parsifal on February 15, 2014, 03:42:13 PM
I will probably be sampling parts of this release whenever I get around to making some of my own music again.

Did you ask permission?

Irrelevant.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 04:13:25 PM
inbeforesued
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Blanko on February 15, 2014, 04:19:34 PM
What is free use
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: spoon on February 15, 2014, 11:09:02 PM
>implying anything the beatles did was "genius"
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on February 15, 2014, 11:34:17 PM
>implying anything the beatles did was "genius"

Quite right.  The only genius was Theodor Adorno.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Pete Svarrior on February 20, 2014, 09:12:08 AM
>implying anything the beatles did was "genius"
I dunno bro, that one time when they said "number 9" many times was pretty cool.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on April 08, 2014, 07:00:28 PM
14:50   Saddam   Crudblud is a funk musician
14:51   Saddam   He plays funk
14:51   Crudblud   That is actually not true
14:52   Saddam   Incorrect
14:52   Saddam   I've listened to your funky music
14:52   Saddam   Everyone was dancing and grooving
14:53   Saddam   Crudblud is funkier than Grand Funk Railroad
14:53   Saddam   Which isn't saying much, really
14:53   Barkno   Crudblud's music is pretty fucking funky
14:54   Saddam   His next project will be a disco album
14:54   Barkno   His every project is a disco album
14:54   Saddam   It'll be like the Rolling Stones' Some Girls
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 11, 2014, 07:29:31 AM
Saddam will be pleased with the following funk. This piece, titled Motbourne Rag, is a "musique concréte" based on a piece I wrote for a competition.

Download here (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE24_Motbourne_Rag_2014.zip)

Stream here (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/motbourne-rag)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on May 11, 2014, 03:18:26 PM
Eerie.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Pete Svarrior on May 12, 2014, 02:25:25 AM
laughing trombones!
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Ghost of V on May 12, 2014, 02:33:31 AM
Impressive discography. I had no idea you were a musician. Keep up the good sounds.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 13, 2014, 04:57:48 PM
Thanks, fellas.

@Parsifal: I made a FLAC folder (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/), I'll try to get more stuff in there soon.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 23, 2014, 02:59:46 PM
Presenting Oat (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/oat)

Stay tuned for a special mix by Prof. Dr. V. Smart and the full release with ubiquitous liner notes which will confuse Saddam.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Eddy Baby on May 23, 2014, 03:05:45 PM
What the fuck are you from Sheffield
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 23, 2014, 03:09:10 PM
Yes.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Eddy Baby on May 23, 2014, 03:09:56 PM
Me too. We should do a gig some time.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 23, 2014, 03:12:40 PM
I'm not a performer.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Eddy Baby on May 23, 2014, 03:16:04 PM
We should collaborate. I could be responsible for 'putting a bangin donk' on your music.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on May 24, 2014, 04:15:46 AM
Nice job, Crudblud.   It would make a perfect soundtrack for one of those comedy shorts of the 1920s, or maybe even a Tom and Jerry cartoon.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: jroa on May 24, 2014, 08:04:43 AM
Where did you study music, Crudblud? 
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on May 24, 2014, 08:08:05 AM
Where did you study music, Crudblud? 
lol
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 24, 2014, 08:31:55 AM
Where did you study music, Crudblud?
I didn't.

Nice job, Crudblud.   It would make a perfect soundtrack for one of those comedy shorts of the 1920s, or maybe even a Tom and Jerry cartoon.
Thanks. I'm not so sure I'd agree with those specific choices, it's a lot less cut and dried than a typical Looney Tunes score in terms of obvious references, and the short would have to be written around the music, which animators would probably find quite limiting, but I would like to try my hand at doing that kind of scoring at some point. And I do admire Carl Stalling, so to be compared is quite an honour.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: jroa on May 24, 2014, 08:55:15 AM
Where did you study music, Crudblud?
I didn't.

Oh, I wouldn't have known.  Great work. 
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: NewSeeker on June 13, 2014, 02:29:16 AM
I'm at work, but if this is Soundscore music than count me in!
I'm still missing at least 2 songs from Creepshow.

Would be nice if you could recreate the background music from when Bedelia was standing at the house right before snatching a flower to before her father burst through the ground.

I've been looking for this track for years. Dear God...I'm such a nerd.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on June 13, 2014, 04:55:11 PM
I'm at work, but if this is Soundscore music than count me in!
I'm still missing at least 2 songs from Creepshow.

Would be nice if you could recreate the background music from when Bedelia was standing at the house right before snatching a flower to before her father burst through the ground.

I've been looking for this track for years. Dear God...I'm such a nerd.
You're asking the wrong guy.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on June 13, 2014, 07:06:04 PM
Crudblud doesn't do requests.  If he did, I'd already have him working on an elaborate postmodern rock anthem.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on June 19, 2014, 06:11:41 PM
Presenting Oat (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/oat)

Stay tuned for a special mix by Prof. Dr. V. Smart and the full release with ubiquitous liner notes which will confuse Saddam.

When is full release
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Eddy Baby on June 19, 2014, 09:25:00 PM
This didn't sound 'oat' like I imagined it to.


heheheheheh
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on June 20, 2014, 12:36:36 AM
Presenting Oat (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/oat)

Stay tuned for a special mix by Prof. Dr. V. Smart and the full release with ubiquitous liner notes which will confuse Saddam.

When is full release

Ask Parsifal, I'm waiting for him to finish that mix. I guess I could just release it now, but I think it's interesting to have two perspectives on the piece.

This didn't sound 'oat' like I imagined it to.


heheheheheh

Oh you!
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on July 17, 2014, 12:25:11 PM
While we wait for the final release of Oat, I thought I'd share a short piece I wrote for piano and violin for a competition last month. It's a little bit more conservative than most of my work, as per the competition rules it had to be written largely to the limitations of the physical instruments, and has a fairly clear and linear thematic development throughout.

Compressed Burlesque [mp3] (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/01%20-%20Compressed%20Burlesque.mp3)

Compressed Burlesque [FLAC] (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/01%20-%20Compressed%20Burlesque.flac)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on July 17, 2014, 12:36:44 PM
It was short, but I liked it. Nice work, Cazazze.

now Oat
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on July 17, 2014, 01:23:09 PM
It was short, but I liked it. Nice work, Cazazze.

now Oat
Tell Parsifal to get his shit together.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on July 18, 2014, 04:18:18 PM
Also, some notes I typed up:

Compressed Burlesque is rather conventional compared to my work of the past two years. It has a pretty small pool of basic materials and fewer diversions than I usually allow. The opening chord sequence is frequently repeated in various guises, ranging from a 5/8 riff (first appearing at 0'16") to a sort of cheesy '80s pop/rock progression (2'00" - 2'20"). After the '80s section, the piece appears to break down and go off on a tangent, what actually occurs here is the opening violin melody inverted on the piano, then played backwards with the 5/8 riff on top of it, while the violin provides a sort of percussive pizzicato following the rhythms of both the melody and the riff.

The second theme on the violin is the second most common element after the opening chord sequence. It appears in many mutations, which were developed in reverse order to how they appear in the piece, and the first appearance starting at 0'42" is actually the final development. In the '80s section, this melody is related to the first version of the second theme appearing at 3'02", but is combined with the piano part in that section also, then tapered to fit the '80s progression.

The main diversions are the slow waltz at 1'09" and the section from 2'55" - 3'01". Neither of these really has anything to do with the rest of the piece, they were just things that intuitively fit the moment for me, although the latter is kind of a play on the "burlesque" idea, a sort of sideways nod to the American burlesque while the rest of the piece concerns more the original meaning. Speaking of which, what's the subject of this burlesque? Various things, but in the main I had this kind of mutated version of Stravinsky's Violin Concerto in my head, and the first violin melody made me think of Jimmy Buffet for some reason, even though this sounds nothing like the gloriously titled Cheeseburger in Paradise or any other songs of his that I'm aware of. In general, the piece does not have much of anything in common with its inspirations, but the title still seemed to make sense to me.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Zentic Lord on July 18, 2014, 11:18:38 PM
Zentifically speaking, this music makes about as much sense as an Andy Warhorse movie.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: fappenhosen on July 19, 2014, 04:22:53 PM
Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: jroa on July 24, 2014, 08:45:40 AM
Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Snupes on July 24, 2014, 11:17:30 AM
Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

(http://i.imgur.com/1t5Kuxl.gif)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: fappenhosen on July 24, 2014, 08:16:32 PM
Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

NO NOT BURNED THE GRAMMAR IN THE SENTENCE CLEARLY INDICATED I HAVE HAD SEX AT LEAST ONCE TWICE IF YOU COUNT FINGERING
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Particle Person on July 25, 2014, 12:39:35 AM
Stream on Soundcloud (http://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/emergent)

I put this on now when I'm putting the sex in womens.

So, you never get to listen to it then?

NO NOT BURNED THE GRAMMAR IN THE SENTENCE CLEARLY INDICATED I HAVE HAD SEX AT LEAST ONCE TWICE IF YOU COUNT FINGERING

wikimedia.com/list_of_burned_centers
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on August 04, 2014, 10:05:48 AM
Parsifal: Oat
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on September 08, 2014, 02:27:54 AM
Greeb groogley doogley, it's Male Goat Odes! What? Yes, really, it is! And you too can join in the fun by clicking one of the links below as suits your personal preference, which is always nice. Witness the mighty theorbo in Pythagorean tuning! See the clarinet do a thing real fast! All this and more, only in Male Goat Odes!

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE25_Male_Goat_Odes_2014.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Male_Goat_Odes_FLAC.zip)

Stream on SoundCloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/male-goat-odes)

Burp.

P.S.: SoundCloud sucks, I encourage you to actually download the mp3 or FLAC to hear it properly.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Saddam Hussein on September 08, 2014, 02:53:01 AM
A delightful listen.  I don't quite know what it was about, but it was great anyway.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Snupes on September 08, 2014, 03:40:26 AM
That was indeed very good. As you all know from extensive reading of my reviews, I am not very good at reviewing music, so I don't know a whole lot more to say than that. I'm particularly doubleplus ungood at reviewing more "classical" (feel free to berate my mislabeling of stuff) pieces like this because you're almost my only experience with it, but yeah. I loved the part around 11:38 - 11:50 because I am weird and like screechy weird stuff.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on September 08, 2014, 12:37:14 PM
Thanks guys!

Oh by the way, motherfucking Oat!

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE26_Oat_2014.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Oat_FLAC.zip)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Foxbox on October 03, 2014, 07:28:56 PM
By the way people, Oat is fucking great.


Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on October 03, 2014, 07:30:30 PM
Will it cure my knee-ache?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: jroa on October 07, 2014, 03:47:00 PM
Will it cure my knee-ache?

Only the power of Oden can do that. 
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on October 07, 2014, 04:15:52 PM
Will it cure my knee-ache?

Only the power of Oden can do that. 
Wrong. Oat cured my knee-ache.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 03, 2015, 12:14:15 PM
Recently I finished writing a short article relevant to my own work that I thought I would share here. I will have new music out this year, but the major project is quite large and complex, so it might be another month or more before it is finished. Please bear with me.

THE COMPUTER AS MUSICIAN

Computers have been used in music for over half a century now, from RCA's room-filling monstrosities to the Synclavier's tapeless studio and finally the common PC, yet, even with steadily growing acceptance in both “serious” and popular music, there remains a cumbersome taboo against these complex and awesome machines and the artists who use them. Consider the bedroom hip-hop producer: sat on their bed, hunched over a laptop, Beats by Dr Dre plastered to one ear in goofy approximation of the Hollywood record company exec, ctrl+v'ing ad nauseam the same block of MIDI data across a vast stretch of FL Studio sequencer space, selling for £5 apiece the fruits of their non-labour. This largely invented reality suits with uncanny convenience the view of a great many people who simply refuse to believe that effort ever should or even could be expended in the production of the dreaded, filthy, depraved and seriously unhealthy computer music.

“Computer music.” Let's think about that term for a moment. What does it mean, exactly? There are a handful of artificially intelligent composers operating at the time of writing, each of them developing their own musical environments through action and reaction based on algorithms. Unlike chess, where this algorithmic approach has resulted in many grandmaster level AIs, music composition is an essentially free process, there are no rules in any given piece which the composer has not chosen for themselves or at least agreed to follow, but the AI composer has no choice, their rules are chosen for them and they comply only because they have as little control over their material as over the specifications of their hardware. That is computer music: an interdisciplinary study combining artificial intelligence and music composition, where the musical output is the product of prescribed formulae within a highly limited mathematical framework. However, what is most commonly meant by “computer music” is the composition or production of music using the MIDI system, usually through a (semi-)dedicated frontend like the aforementioned FL Studio, Steinberg Cubase, Propellerhead Reason, their ancestor MUSIC (Max Matthews, Bell Labs) etc. and that the composer is a slave to this system, being afforded only slightly more control than I entertained of our artificial counterparts. This is not the truth of MIDI, as I will discuss below, but for now let's clear up the nomenclature a little: rather than “computer music,” I call what I do “computer rendered composition,” not the catchiest of phrases in the terminology book, but preferable at least to having one's work lumped in with the output of the Iamus cluster.

In computer rendered composition, the composer takes on simultaneously the responsibility of conductor, that is to say they write the music and shape the performance at the same time. This is something of an alien concept even to people who work largely with computers in lieu of a Mendelssohnian personal orchestra to torture with every half-realised, overly ambitious and ham-fisted sonic nightmare that pops into their head; they haven't yet become aware that they are writing for a different breed of musician, one that does exactly what it is told, necessitating a different approach to composition. This oblivion state manifests itself in the form of many interesting and generally deplorable phenomena, popular examples include the teenager who doesn't know, doesn't care, dreams of being the next John Williams and is armed with oh-so-cinematic “hit the button and watch it go” tools like Symphobia, and also the serious composer labouring over some dreadful ersatz Mozart in Finale. The latter example brings to mind a quote from Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot: “there's man all over for you, blaming on his boots the faults of his feet.” I am of course referring to the oft made excuse “it's the MIDI rendering, not me” which is forthcoming when the composer is confronted with criticisms of the dreaded “sounds like a metronome” or indeed any other variety, yet this will always be the fault of the composer for not realising the extra responsibilities involved in seeing a computer rendered piece to its conclusion.

The hordes of reactionary music students who want to go back in time a few hundred years while remaining exactly when they are, do not get along well with computers, which for them are relegated to the lowly position of scorewriter, and there is understandably an annoyance approaching and sometimes exceeding rage at these damnable machines that play everything metronomically as if music were a kind of temporal marksmanship. We play for peace and harmony, man, the piano is not a machine gun.  But the computer's just following orders, brother, and getting your mood ring back to a mellow yellow is as simple as issuing the right orders in the right way. Severely clumsy references to the good old days in which I never lived aside, MIDI is a rich language of near infinite potential for use in music creation, whether on its own or in an augmented unit with acoustic and electric instruments and, perhaps best of all, requires no thousand page densely worded textbooks or years of tutelage to learn. Anti-intellectual? Perhaps, but then what exactly is intellectual about music in the first place? At some point one has to confront the fact that music is the most open of all art forms, where the intellectual aspects are optional at best, and the potential for intuitive development is limitless. Of course, there are many theoretical systems for the organisation of all aspects of music to which the composer can choose to adhere, and collected into the field of music theory they offer up a grand academic pursuit for many scholars, but these are far from the be all and end all of musical thought no matter if one is taking pen to paper or mouse pointer to sequencer.

The main goal of this short essay has been to encourage you, no matter what kind of music you make or might be interested in making, to explore the potential of computer technology in your work, to embrace its vastness of application regardless of past experiences, prejudices and misconceptions, and perhaps most importantly to avoid viewing the world of music as one of clichés and binary extremes. At no point would I suggest computer rendered composition as the singularity to which all musical progress leads, nor that anyone should believe they must necessarily go to it. The dogma of Darmstadt is long done and dusted, the composer finally free to pursue their interests without ideological persecution, yet it is only through exploration of ideas, both those that inspire enthusiasm and those that inspire reticence, that we develop and grow as composers. I believe the computer musician needs more advocates, and that maybe, just maybe, you can help it out. So, if you're reading this, please spare a thought for the metal box humming away to itself atop your desk, it's good for more than just checking your e-mail and watching YouTube.
 

FURTHER LISTENING
This is not intended to be a comprehensive or objective list. All selections are either fully or largely computer rendered, or feature a significant computer rendered element. In square brackets I have noted the technology and/or facility used.

Milton Babbitt - Occasional Variations (1971) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QySxbkRmYwE) [RCA Mark II, Princeton EMC]
Pierre Boulez - ...explosante-fixe... (1993) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yB7adkok144) [MIDI, IRCAM]*
Hans Edler - Elektron Kukéso (1971) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJnBhIrcx3M) [Elektronmusikstudio Stockholm]**
Jonathan Harvey - Mortuos Plango Vivos Voco (1980) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxEGPIEraFA) [MUSIC-N, IRCAM]
Charles Wuorinen - Time's Encomium (1969) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKq8DkBk_GA) [RCA Mark II, Princeton EMC]
Frank Zappa - Civilization Phaze III (1993) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eJqgP5e-_s) [Synclavier, UMRK]

Note: I use the terms “serious music” and “popular music” only for the purpose of distinction between what I feel are the two supergeneric schools of thought in our time.

*MIDI rendered flute plus acoustic instruments
**Made using a computer which was full of bugs and produced unpredictable results. This was supposed to be a hit pop record but ended up being something quite different.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: spoon on February 03, 2015, 02:06:45 PM
Love the article
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 03, 2015, 03:07:46 PM
Love the article
Cheers, spoon!
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on March 03, 2015, 10:59:24 PM
And now, the one Saddam has been waiting for! It's Table Arias, which is what happens when you ask me to make dadrock. The liner notes contain lore specially written for the Sadman himself.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE27_Table_Arias_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Table_Arias_FLAC.zip)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on April 05, 2015, 12:39:59 PM
Brand new album Bit Player is here, and it's a doozy! Or is it?! Listen and find out!

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDA14_Bit_Player_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Bit%20Player%20FLAC.zip)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on April 06, 2015, 03:34:25 PM
Immediately after work on Bit Player was completed, I started to mess around with it with a view to creating a companion piece, which is this thing here.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDA15_Bit_Parts_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Bit_Parts_FLAC.zip)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Pete Svarrior on April 06, 2015, 05:34:51 PM
Brand new album Bit Player is here, and it's a doozy! Or is it?!
My feng shui has been messed with. I hope you're proud of yourself.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on April 06, 2015, 05:52:48 PM
Brand new album Bit Player is here, and it's a doozy! Or is it?!
My feng shui has been messed with. I hope you're proud of yourself.
I certainly am. Thank you for allowing the aforementioned messing to occur.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on April 20, 2015, 07:17:45 PM
I now have around a quarter of my output on bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/), as opposed to the nothing that has been on there for the past few years.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on April 20, 2015, 09:54:06 PM
yaaayy
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Pete Svarrior on April 21, 2015, 06:49:10 AM
Cazazza Dan makes generic pop music for money and fame. He is terrible. Just terrible.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 23, 2015, 09:31:15 AM
And speaking of generic pop music... Holy shitballs, The Hole has arrived! 41 minutes of wacky sex music shamelessly stolen from a Barbados rum commercial slowed down to the point of being unrecognisable with a bit of the old shellac crackle pop serial operations thrown in for a waddlin' good time. Get it now, or don't, you can't always get it later, but get it, and be glad you didn't.

Whig spiggin' spopper spoops juioiuioiuioiuaoiueoiaueoaiueust done get enough, ugh ugh, WAUUUUGH!

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDA16_The_Hole_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/The_Hole_FLAC.zip)

Munch munch munch yr lunch lunch lunch.

here abound streams (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/the-hole)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Blanko on May 23, 2015, 04:44:59 PM
Based on Very Subtle's (last name unknown) very subtle suggestion, I thought I'd write a review on The Hole, despite my complete lack of proficiency in writing reviews for music.

In this album, Cazazza Dan makes a departure from his usual zany boops and wacky melodies to create something evoking the two tenets of Boring and Repetitive, which to me makes for a pleasant surprise, as I have been repeatedly told by certain individuals that I like those two things very much. It's markedly industrial in style; the dark and moody ambience from what sounds like banging of kitchen tools together and slowed down to extremes provides a great backdrop to a harrowing and surreal experience. Some of Cazazza Dan's usual instrumentation can be heard at times, although much more subdued and subtle, merely contributing to the sea of noise but not overshadowing it.

The Hole seems to be a concept album in structure, as the story of the hole itself is told through a great reading provided by Foxbox in the second track, Monodrama. After that, the narrative becomes more implicit, as the narration is distorted to the point of no recognition, to illustrate the descent into the hole and the surreal environment that it is. The distorted voices become more prominent and sound more agitated as time goes on, and you can hear in it the madness that the hole evokes.

The combination of ambience, harsh tones, musique concrète noises and distorted voices mixed with actual narration is very reminiscent to industrial music in general, but to me it reminded me the most of Swans' Soundtracks for the Blind, an album that to my knowledge Crudblud hasn't even listened to yet; what a gay.

It should go without saying at this point that if you like industrial or dark ambient music, you will most likely enjoy this album quite a lot, as I did. It is a fine piece of production that successfully creates an atmosphere it strives for, without ever seeming too predictable or unoriginal.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 23, 2015, 05:43:17 PM
Based on Very Subtle's (last name unknown) very subtle suggestion, I thought I'd write a review on The Hole, despite my complete lack of proficiency in writing reviews for music.

In this album, Cazazza Dan makes a departure from his usual zany boops and wacky melodies to create something evoking the two tenets of Boring and Repetitive, which to me makes for a pleasant surprise, as I have been repeatedly told by certain individuals that I like those two things very much. It's markedly industrial in style; the dark and moody ambience from what sounds like banging of kitchen tools together and slowed down to extremes provides a great backdrop to a harrowing and surreal experience. Some of Cazazza Dan's usual instrumentation can be heard at times, although much more subdued and subtle, merely contributing to the sea of noise but not overshadowing it.

This is correct in a sense. The beginning and end are built out of piano and violin tracks from a piece I wrote last year, in that sense it retains a material connection to my other work, but its treatment here is totally transformative, and very little recognisable instrument sounds are featured. The rest is almost entirely made from Foxbox's voice, whether from entire recordings or phrases or even single phonemes, using a wide array of manipulative techniques combining sample stretching and compression, pitch bending, filters, delays, signal amplification, distortion, noise removal. Almost all the work is created through combining these things in different configurations, though of course occasionally a simple application using a single tool did the job just fine. The background is actually street noise from outside my house, but the dry signal is completely removed and replaced with 200% wet signal reverb with a 6000ms tail and heavy diffusion, which makes the majority of the noise fluidly integrated while maintaining the individuality of its components to a degree, creating a spacious environment for the actually constructed elements of the piece to exist in.

Quote
The Hole seems to be a concept album in structure, as the story of the hole itself is told through a great reading provided by Foxbox in the second track, Monodrama. After that, the narrative becomes more implicit, as the narration is distorted to the point of no recognition, to illustrate the descent into the hole and the surreal environment that it is. The distorted voices become more prominent and sound more agitated as time goes on, and you can hear in it the madness that the hole evokes.

The combination of ambience, harsh tones, musique concrète noises and distorted voices mixed with actual narration is very reminiscent to industrial music in general, but to me it reminded me the most of Swans' Soundtracks for the Blind, an album that to my knowledge Crudblud hasn't even listened to yet; what a gay.

It should go without saying at this point that if you like industrial or dark ambient music, you will most likely enjoy this album quite a lot, as I did. It is a fine piece of production that successfully creates an atmosphere it strives for, without ever seeming too predictable or unoriginal.

The narrative elements of the piece, although the most obvious, are more means to a musical end, since it is the musical elements of speech that drive it for the bulk of its duration. I was very interested in getting inside the phonemes, drawing them out and exposing their melodic and timbral qualities, and things hidden inside them which could only be revealed through stripping them down to bare components, and to work with these components in a number of ways. This idea, which is the conceptual basis for tracks 3-6, was mainly inspired by Robert Ashley's Automatic Writing, which takes the editing of sentences down to basic phonemes, or rather the removal of meaning through this editing, as its focal point. In this way, I suppose, both The Hole and Automatic Writing comment on what is musical and what is extramusical. Words are extramusical, but their phonetic components as spoken are musical, the result of sentence deconstruction as practised in both pieces is perhaps a blurring of the line between the two.

Also thanks for listening, I'm glad you liked it! And yes, I will stop being gay and listen to Soundtracks for the Blind soon.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Snupes on May 24, 2015, 09:56:44 AM


And yes, I will stop being gay and listen to Soundtracks for the Blind soon.

I wouldn't recommend this unless you're looking to be in severe pain.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Parsifal on May 24, 2015, 10:13:56 AM
The Hole is good, but too long. Listen to it anyway.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 24, 2015, 11:26:25 AM
And yes, I will stop being gay and listen to Soundtracks for the Blind soon.

I wouldn't recommend this unless you're looking to be in severe pain.
I will wear ear condoms.

The Hole is good, but too long. Listen to it anyway.
Would you care to elaborate on this criticism?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Parsifal on May 24, 2015, 11:52:41 AM
The Hole is good, but too long. Listen to it anyway.
Would you care to elaborate on this criticism?

I just found that there was too much of the same. At some point during "Deconstruction", my attention started to waver, and as a result I have a much clearer recollection of the first half of the album than the second.

It's also not the sort of music I would normally listen to, so I wouldn't take my criticism as a particularly well-seasoned commentary.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on July 07, 2015, 03:21:03 PM
Look out, surfers, here come the hodads! Yes indeed, the Cazazze returns with Problem Zero, eighteen solid minutes of hot surfin' tunes for you to stand around on a beach to, featuring soprano sax, harpsichord, psaltery, kkwaengwari, janggu, and buk in eight exquisite musical manoeuvres.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE28_Problem_Zero_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Problem_Zero_FLAC.zip)

And streamy things here (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/problem-zero) (the vastly preferable streaming option) and here (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/problem-zero) (the not so hot streaming option).
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: junker on July 07, 2015, 03:55:02 PM

Look out, surfers, here come the hodads! Yes indeed, the Cazazze returns with Problem Zero, eighteen solid minutes of hot surfin' tunes for you to stand around on a beach to, featuring soprano sax, harpsichord, psaltery, kkwaengwari, janggu, and buk in eight exquisite musical manoeuvres.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE28_Problem_Zero_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Problem_Zero_FLAC.zip)

And streamy things here (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/problem-zero) (the vastly preferable streaming option) and here (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/problem-zero) (the not so hot streaming option).

I will listen to this the next time I eat at Hodad's.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on July 07, 2015, 04:19:32 PM

Look out, surfers, here come the hodads! Yes indeed, the Cazazze returns with Problem Zero, eighteen solid minutes of hot surfin' tunes for you to stand around on a beach to, featuring soprano sax, harpsichord, psaltery, kkwaengwari, janggu, and buk in eight exquisite musical manoeuvres.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE28_Problem_Zero_2015.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Problem_Zero_FLAC.zip)

And streamy things here (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/problem-zero) (the vastly preferable streaming option) and here (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/problem-zero) (the not so hot streaming option).

I will listen to this the next time I eat at Hodad's.

There will be zero problems should you choose to do so.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on August 13, 2016, 11:24:23 PM
Resurrected!

No new new music yet, I'm too busy with my work as a writer/composer for a game project to compose much new stuff right now. But here's my arrangement of the first scherzo from Mahler's 10th symphony. I haven't bothered to set up my FTP client yet, so there are no regular downloads, but I've uploaded it to two different streaming sites.

bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/shameless-butchery)

soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/mahlerscherzo)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on August 14, 2016, 12:34:01 AM
Why is this so good?
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on August 17, 2016, 12:12:31 AM
Thanks beardo!

Also, super news: a selection of my music is now available on YouTube! (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtLp1uXhMPyr7kFaRpBOfAA/videos?shelf_id=0&sort=dd&view=0)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: beardo on August 17, 2016, 01:57:05 AM
lol subscreebed haha
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on September 21, 2016, 10:50:27 PM
Resurrected!

No new new music yet, I'm too busy with my work as a writer/composer for a game project to compose much new stuff right now. But here's my arrangement of the first scherzo from Mahler's 10th symphony. I haven't bothered to set up my FTP client yet, so there are no regular downloads, but I've uploaded it to two different streaming sites.

bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/shameless-butchery)

soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/mahlerscherzo)

!!!

Downloads now available in super hot (super hot super hot) mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE29_Shameless_Butchery_2016.zip) and FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Shameless_Butchery_FLAC.zip) with liner notes!
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on October 22, 2016, 12:16:54 PM
Oh shirty shit. Here we go again, it's Portal Preludes you prognosticating perambulators.

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE30_Portal_Preludes_2016.zip)
FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Portal_Preludes_FLAC.zip)

YouTube (https://youtu.be/Mw8W-R4qmEE)
Bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/portal-preludes)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on December 20, 2016, 03:31:41 AM
mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE31_Fat_Trout_Neighbour_2016.zip)

FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Fat_Trout_Neighbour_FLAC.zip)

GuestTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW9VymehXJc)

soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/fat-trout-neighbour)

bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/fat-trout-neighbour)

hit me up assholes

YUH
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on January 12, 2017, 04:33:12 PM
Brief new piano piece called "Monumentum". Give it a shot, why not?

Downloads:
mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDS03_Monumentum_2017.zip)
FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Monumentum_FLAC.zip)

Streaming:
YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXUUie-GmDo)
bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/monumentum)
soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/monumentum)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on January 26, 2017, 12:59:14 AM
Parsifal suggested I get a Patreon and I thought "why not". So here we are (https://www.patreon.com/cazazzadan).

idk why anyone would want to give me money but okay
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Parsifal on February 03, 2017, 04:14:54 AM
A week later and I'm still the only patron. Am I really the only one here who likes Crudblud's stuff? I doubt it.

Words are cheap. If you like the music, support the artist.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: honk on February 03, 2017, 05:04:13 AM
Music should be free.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Elusive Rabbit on February 03, 2017, 09:20:32 PM
Music should be free.
I can hear an infuriated, shirtless Lars Ulrich in the distance beating the ground with his sweaty fists and screeching. Good job, you made him upset.

He's gonna take you down like Napster.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 10, 2017, 09:21:39 AM
Well folks, I made it, here's another one!

No mere pabulum, it's a pianistic parade, a plethora of pianoid planetoid paranoids passionately perambulating in pink pyjamas by the palatial pavilions of pantonal pathos. Pax, pals, and do partake, won't you please? Pints of Brine pervades the air, a panacea for all your cares.

Download in mp3 with liner notes (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE32_Pints_of_Brine_2017.zip)

Download in FLAC with liner notes (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Pints_of_Brine_FLAC.zip)

Stream on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0JSAoGau2Y)

Stream on Bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/pints-of-brine)

Stream on Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/pints-of-brine)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on May 27, 2017, 06:50:23 AM
Greet'n's ones against, mine fiends. I am here to give the gift of violinistic villainy via An Ængliscmans Partyta, the new musical work of thee one and lonely Cadenza Darn!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njJxdWr-qwI

Downloads are available in mp3 (V0) (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE33_An_Aengliscmans_Partyta_2017.zip) and FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/An_Aengliscmans_Partyta_FLAC.zip) for those of disconcerting tased.

And streams are upon Bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/an-ngliscmans-partyta) and Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/an-aengliscmans-partyta).
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on August 16, 2017, 07:38:47 PM
Might as well post this here. This is a thing I wrote for a fantasy RPG, it was rejected so I put it on YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hu5zz9BPOJ4
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on August 18, 2017, 03:39:40 PM
Don't think I posted about them before on this thread that everyone reads and replies to, so here's muh doodles (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi_KqKAccvML1x22768tTZ0m9fU9-o5QY). They were originally intended to be short pieces I could do while composing soundtrack stuff, but I underestimated how much work I had so I haven't done as many as I wanted. They're YouTube "exclusives" for the time being, but maybe I'll release them in compilations when I have enough together.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on September 28, 2017, 06:13:14 PM
As some of you may know, for the past year and a half or so I've been composing music and writing text for an RPG. Said RPG recently had some serious investor trouble (i.e.: there is no money to pay me for my work) and I have left the project, taking my work with me. Some people on IRC were interested in hearing/reading some of the stuff I had produced, particularly Snupes and Saddam, so I have now uploaded a selection of music to YouTube. The lore books will have to wait a little while for public release, as I would like to write some additional explanatory articles which will hopefully give people an idea of what I wanted to achieve in terms of worldbuilding in this project.

Last month I posted the "Symphonic Overture" for the game. I had proposed it as a main theme/main menu music, but it was rejected as being "too Star Wars"—a criticism I don't really understand, but go ahead and listen for yourself and see what you think. Now I'm posting stuff that was not rejected, that would have been heard in game, and particularly in the major cities of the game, of which there were to be roughly eight. I had intended to compose around 20 minutes of music per city, which would essentially form little playlists reinforcing the characters of the places and their people. Originally I was asked to compose generic ambient music for pretty much everything, but I argued for a more interesting approach to depicting in musical form the lives of the cities, and when I presented my prototypes I was able to win that argument. I had also intended that themes from the city music would appear in variations in the music for the open world areas surrounding each city, but unfortunately I was not able to progress to that stage of my plan.

Basically, I wanted to use part of the soundtrack as a worldbuilding tool, as a means of complementing NPC dialogues, lore books, the architectural designs of the cities etc. and all these elements would come together to form a complete experience with the gameplay that was more than the sum of its parts, a kind of immersion that, as far as I'm aware, had not been previously attempted in an RPG. Alas!

Anyway, I've posted up music from four cities, and I haven't done any additional work on them. They are not all exactly "final product", I intended to go back later and clean up some of the details, but ain't gonna happen now, so whatever. I have more to post (including something I actually do want to do extra work on, for reasons which will become clear when I post it), and I will eventually, but this should be more than enough for the time being. See the descriptions for each video for more detailed info on the individual doodads.

The Arch Thorian Prototype (https://youtu.be/DCKDqdQo9JU)

Musick from the Lutenists' Guild of Thadwyck (https://youtu.be/yrLLCAdE7M0)

Accordion Music from Oleand (https://youtu.be/1UCxQA4Z3E0)

The Tocane Wind Quintet (https://youtu.be/u1K_JWu2dqg)
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on December 16, 2017, 12:30:09 AM
Welp, seeing as I'm back for the time being, better get the thread up to date.

Last month I released an album, my first in two years, and it's quite the doozy if I do say so myself. It's the longest self-contained composition I have ever made, and I think also probably my best to date.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyXw0NQV-qc

If Yute Oob nis eower bagge, festen thine eyen 'pon downtoads in eower choyce ofe mp3 (https://mega.nz/#!YKJB3J6B!lbBv_gDxDKUF4buvXtyY2wHY9njejZy954TvqYWFIaI) ek FLAC (https://mega.nz/#!xPBVzSaA!xUSWasyfk8lV-arRrHdFWsSn-X0X2z5OZ9ah6JjwDeE).

And of course, streaming audio is available on Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/starlite-revue) and Bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/starlite-revue) (where it is also available to purchase at a price of your choosing if for some reason you feel like spending money on free stuff).
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 17, 2018, 06:50:17 PM
I haven't had much time for original music lately, mostly I've been writing, and musical efforts have almost exclusively been soundtrack work. Of course, it doesn't help that I haven't really had any musical ideas since finishing Starlite Revue, but occasionally a little something can be fashioned out of (almost) nothing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNg3hjHgVmo
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 19, 2018, 02:30:37 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkhGdjbLzU8
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on March 31, 2018, 05:23:37 AM
Heyo folkeroos, I made a piano thing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP54ZYExaH4
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on April 16, 2018, 01:33:20 PM
More piano. One of these days I'm actually going to compose something substantial again...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45Aw0CGyrWM
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Cain on April 18, 2018, 04:34:55 PM
More piano. One of these days I'm actually going to compose something substantial again...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45Aw0CGyrWM
You should compose a 12 hour long rock opera with biting political commentary and at least 9 instruments next.
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on September 03, 2018, 08:16:57 PM
Resurrection!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynLgop6eujY

Downloads are available in mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDE34_Noisy_Dreamer_2018.zip) and FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Noisy%20Dreamer_FLAC.zip), and alternative streams are up at Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/cazazza-dan/noisydreamer) and Bandcamp (https://cazazzadan.bandcamp.com/album/noisy-dreamer).
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on October 11, 2018, 06:38:06 PM
I put out a single, modelled on the 45 rpm style sides of old.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOtrBrs8zwk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9da6Tijosw

mp3 (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/CDSI12_Sly_Incandes_2018.zip) and FLAC (http://crudblud.sjm.so/CazazzaDan/FLAC/Sly_Incandes_FLAC.zip) downloads available
Title: Re: Cazazza Dan
Post by: Crudblud on February 21, 2019, 08:34:42 PM
Yep, this thread is still a thing that exists.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=si9aZiUPdp8