Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2040 on: May 25, 2020, 05:42:08 PM »
I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore (dir. Macon Blair)

It's not bad, but it reads like a checklist of lighter David Lynch and Coen brothers tropes mashed together without the respective authorial voices that make them work. Or rather, Macon Blair doesn't have the maturity as a filmmaker to channel the stuff he likes into a genuine expression of his own authorial voice. The film is saved somewhat by the central character, Ruth, being quite ordinary and relatable. They did a good job of building a down to earth character to centre the film around, but the pulpy aspects of the film are played too light to really feel like they impact on her world. Christian and his gang of creeps feel throwaway given how central they are to the story. It's not that they need to be deep characters to be threatening villains, but they are all wardrobe and not much else.

An okay film with some good performances of barebones material.

Glad to read this - I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore was on my radar, but I suspected it was going to fall a little too flat for me, and apparently that's how it comes out.  You saved 90 minutes  of my life.


In other news - any other horror film lovers out there?

Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2041 on: May 27, 2020, 07:21:41 PM »
I'm not reading all 100+ pages of this thread, so if i'm doing this wrong, too bad:

Shotgun style, existoid's short reviews:

The Lodge - atmospheric and enjoyable horror. Go into it cold, don't watch the trailer or read anything about it. If you like slow burn horror, you will very likely like this.

Fantasy Island - meh teen level horror.  Good enough for me to watch while playing SNES on another other screen.

Creepshow original Shudder series - exceptional anthology series. Must for horror fans. Sadly, Episode 1 is the best one, but it doesn't deteriorate very much from there.

1917 - "Saving Private Ryan" for WW1.

Come to Daddy - fine acting by Elijah Wood (as always), but also great performance from Stephen McHattie (if you don't know him, check out the exceptionally well done Canadian horror film Pontypool). Very good script and directing as well. Recommend.

Gretel and Hansel - I really wanted to like this; it has several good elements - acting, visuals, atmosphere - but in the end only deserved to have been a 30 min. show dragged out to full length feature. A shame.

Arkansas - Fun crime thriller with discount Chris Hemsworth (who does quite a fine job).

Birds of Prey - Very watchable. But also very forgettable. So, I guess that makes it decent entertainment?

Vampire Hunter D - Saw the original 1985 anime for the first time recently. Pretty good.


 







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Offline Roundy

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2042 on: May 27, 2020, 07:45:14 PM »
Birds of Prey - Very watchable. But also very forgettable. So, I guess that makes it decent entertainment?

That was pretty much my take. It was a couple steps above Suicide Squad, but still kind of short of even the weaker Marvel movies.
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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2043 on: May 27, 2020, 08:24:30 PM »
Birds of Prey - Very watchable. But also very forgettable. So, I guess that makes it decent entertainment?

That was pretty much my take. It was a couple steps above Suicide Squad, but still kind of short of even the weaker Marvel movies.

Totally.

Although, despite the fact that I've watched every single Marvel film, I virtually never look forward to any of them anymore.  It's now more of a  chore to watch them.  The fact that they have more "phases" for the MCU endlessly is wearing me down.   Did we really need 20 films, and do we really need 20 more? 

But that's just me.



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Offline honk

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2044 on: May 27, 2020, 11:57:44 PM »
My own hot take on the MCU, as I've mentioned before on IRC, is that they've begun to drown on their own continuity and endless fanservice. Both Spidey movies, and to a slightly lesser extent, Captain Marvel, neglected telling strong, standalone stories in favor of cramming in as many superfluous references to the previous films as possible. Those movies could not exist in their current state without the prior existence of the MCU, and that's not a good thing. The shared universe can be a fun little bonus, but it's not a crutch, and audiences will eventually grow tired of it if the movies keep using it like one.
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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2045 on: May 30, 2020, 07:08:47 AM »
Wildlife (dir. Paul Dano)

Quietly earthbound and uncomfortable drama set in 1960 in Montana. A young boy's family life disintegrates as his father, out of work, prideful and desperate, decides to leave home and join his fellow unemployed in fighting forest fires for a pittance. While Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal both turn in fine work as a married couple set to split on diverging paths, Ed Oxenbould's understated performance as fourteen year old Joe (the actor himself was around sixteen at the time of filming) is what holds the film together, its quiet innocence gradually poisoned by tensions between the adults in his life. Dano's direction is a confident and consistent blending of naturalistic photography with cinematic artifice, but may yet lack identity, it is after all his first feature behind the camera—what is clear is that he has learned much from working with Paul Thomas Anderson. Nonetheless, this quiet—I keep using that word, I assure you with good reason—and unflashy debut is a convincing and promising piece of filmmaking.

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2046 on: May 31, 2020, 12:39:11 PM »
The Vessel (dir. Julio Quintana)

Religious (or is it?) drama about an island whose inhabitants live in perpetual mourning for the children who were swept away into the ocean when a wave hit the local school. The story picks up when Leo, whose brother was lost in the tragedy, awakens after drowning during a drunken farewell to his best friend, who does not survive. Leo is compelled for some reason to build the titular vessel out of old tables, chairs, and other wooden debris left behind at the ruined school. The island's priest, at first confused by it, sees the vessel as a symbol of hope and renewal, and helps Leo to complete his project, but the superstitious locals are disturbed by the thought that Leo may be a messenger from God, and a violent energy begins to grow among them.

Pretty much every scene is littered with arresting images, and in that sense it is a successful film, but its wonky script wants on the one hand to be naturalistic while on the other being resplendent with grandiose profundity, so you end up with a pretend everyday speech that feels off. Its unwillingness to embrace a more purposefully artificial style of dialogue in the post-Shakespearian vein of (for example) Herman Melville seems to me to keep it from ever really reaching the heights that it achieves in its visuals. This is no more apparent than whenever the priest, played by Martin Sheen, is on screen. Sheen, who can deliver reverberant thunder in his performances, has a commanding presence befitting his central role among the islanders, but the script subdues him, and when he does get raw it rings untrue because the words sit so ungainly on his tongue.

So, a mixed bag. At under 90 minutes and with visual beauty to spare, it's worth a watch, but I can't ignore that the characters and their words felt largely hollow and weightless, no match for the images they inhabit. Terence Malick, whose films I tend to feel similarly towards, lent his name to the film as executive producer, and I think that just about sums it up.

Offline Dionysios

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2047 on: June 13, 2020, 09:46:36 PM »
‘Apartheid Did Not Die’
By John Pilger

Although admiring Nelson Mandela and especially what he stood for, this outspoken leftist activist actually criticises Mandela and the African National Congress as sellouts to the white racist power structure which actually continues in power in South Africa to this day.

This perspective brings to mind the largely phoney and half-hearted denazification of West Germany after World War 2.

https://vimeo.com/17184007

Re: Just Watched
« Reply #2048 on: June 29, 2020, 05:46:08 AM »
This thread helped me listing out some best movies to watch. Thanks Guys