*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #820 on: January 23, 2018, 05:13:32 PM »
Seriously? Who is it?

Quite serious. I won't out the person, but it can figured out without much trouble...

After preforming an extensive examination, I have concluded that the member in question is Rushy.
>member
>singular

*

Online Parsifal

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5533
  • Professional computer somebody
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #821 on: January 23, 2018, 05:43:04 PM »
>member
>singular

Well, there is only one. That is the context in which it is conventional to use the singular, if I am not mistaken.
when you try to mock anyone while also running the flat earth society. Lol

*

Offline StapleBattery

  • *
  • Posts: 1081
  • This is the line of division.
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #822 on: January 25, 2018, 03:03:44 PM »
I got the platinum trophy for Fallout New Vegas last night. This is probably the best moment of my young life
You just made my list, buddy.  >:(
this world does not have room for another mind as intelligent as yours.

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #823 on: January 29, 2018, 10:34:01 PM »
Finally got around to playing Dark Souls.
I've been playing a little bit every day. Managed to beat Capra Demon on my third try, and I only used the stairs to take care of the dogs. Feels good man.

*

Offline Pete Svarrior

  • e
  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 9692
  • (>^_^)> it's propaganda time (◕‿◕✿)
    • View Profile
    • The Flat Earth Society
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #824 on: January 30, 2018, 01:15:47 PM »
L.A. Noire

(I'll preface this review by saying that I've come into the game pretty much completely blind. All I knew was that it's a Rockstar game, that you're a cop, and that it's set in Los Angeles in the time period where everyone wore a hat. Most of my observations here will be obvious to anyone who has at least heard about the game before.)

I wanted to like this game, but it simply wouldn't let me. It started off pretty good, firmly establishing a general vibe to expect of the rest of the story. You mostly play as Cole Phelps, a cop and a cliché of a hero who doesn't view himself as a hero, but if someone tells him to do something that's not heroic, he tells them to shut up (politely, of course) and rushes in to be a hero. A couple hours into the game, literally all of L.A. knows you and random passers-by start saying things like "Wow, I know this guy, I read in the newspapers that he's an honest cop!" That, by itself, is completely fine. There's nothing wrong with stories like that, and the general feel is quite satisfying as long as you suspend your disbelief.

Gameplay-wise, the game can be broadly broken down into two categories: figuring out dank conspiracies, and shitty minigames that come up just a little bit too often to be forgettable.

The latter really got under my skin:
"Oh no, this person started running away when we told him we're policemen. Quickly, protagonist, chase him by running very slightly faster than he does while everyone else does nothing of use!"
"Oh no, this person is driving away from us because we told him we're policemen. Quickly, protagonist, drive the car slightly faster than they do!"
"Uh oh, this man is engaging you in a fist fight. Quickly, mash the left mouse button until the game tells you you can press Q or R at which point you win and he loses!"
"Shh, this woman is going to a place and we want to follow her. Awkwardly follow her closely, but be careful, she'll be turning around and checking if anyone is following her!"

It's kinda fun the first time around, but by the time you see the fifth instalment of the "LAPD, we need to ask some ques- OH NO HE'S RUNNING WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT!" cutscene, there just isn't enough suspension of disbelief to go with. Some of the minigames are pretty difficult, but in a bad way. Luckily, after you've fucked up 3 times, you can just skip the "action sequence" and get back to the action. So that's good.

Figuring out crimes is the fun part, but that, too, loses its novelty quickly. You mostly figure out who dun it by looking at things and interviewing people.

Looking at things is easy: you go to a place, you walk around until you hear an ominous chime, then you click the left mouse button for Phelps to pick a thing up. Then you rotate the item until the camera zooms in on a pertinent detail and voila, you've learned a thing!

Interviewing people boils down to asking them questions and then deciding how to respond. Your options are named "Truth," "Doubt," and "Lie." The third option is pretty clear - you reckon what they just said contradicts the evidence, and you're about to slam the evidence in their motherfucking face, Phoenix Wright-style. "Doubt" and "Truth" are a bit more difficult. Especially "Doubt," which can mean anything between "uhhh I dunno buddy can I maybe have some more info?" to Phelps losing his shit and threatening to jail an unborn baby, which is clearly an accomplice. You can't really know what will happen if you hit "Doubt." Now, you're not always privy to enough information to immediately know whether or not your interviewee is lying, but have no fear! You can read the dumb oafs' facial expressions, which always give them away. Just stare them down for 5 seconds, and if they do something like this



they're lying, or at least not telling the whole truth. It's never more subtle than that. Seriously.

Eventually, the game forgets its original vibe of Mr Happy-Go-Lucky being a virtuous hero working for good. Without any explanation at all, seemingly for no reason at all, he does something bad (he puts his peepee in a woman who's not his wife, or at least it's heavily implied), and people find out and now everyone hates him. Some people won't even shake his hand, the city riff-raff now says a mix of good and bad things about him when they see him, and radio receivers across the entire metropolis talk about how he did a bad thing. On repeat. He gets demoted, but it's okay, because he's still very good at his job, so he does what he does best - his job. Despite being assigned to a shitty department, he still successfully uncovers 400 dank conspiracies, then things get intense, and just when it looks like we might get some closure, he dies. The end.

7/10 would play. It had just enough great moments to push me through the teeth-grinding stupidity of the whole thing. Go play it, enjoy it, and then come to hate it with me.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 01:26:33 PM by Pete Svarrior »
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we've already addressed it.
Follow the Flat Earth Society on Twitter and Facebook!


*mic stays stationary and earth accelerates upwards towards it*

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #825 on: January 30, 2018, 02:03:21 PM »
L.A. Noire

Good take. At the time it came out a lot of what was pretty obviously bad or repetitive or vaguely defined about its various modes of play seemed to pale in comparison to the astounding fidelity of the performance capture. It took what Heavy Rain had tried to do the previous year and wrapped it around a competently designed narrative played out by good actors, and with controls that didn't feel like trying to fix plumbing with a spork while blindfolded. I feel like it would still have been fairly superficial and inconsequential without the emphasis on the capture tech, but today that is probably what dates it and elevates its major flaws the most.

As an aside, I found the homages to film noir kind of grating. You know, your story already isn't that great, don't go out of your way to remind me of great films like The Third Man and Chinatown while you're telling it. As is so often the case with games that pretend towards a more "prestige" medium (or "mature" subject matter), the novelty of the entire thing preceded sense and good taste.

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #826 on: February 02, 2018, 07:09:27 PM »
I feel a little cheap talking about this based on what little of it (around 80 minutes by Steam's count, and by my count only around ten or fifteen of which consisted of me doing what I wanted rather than being ferried between plot points with little say in the matter) I was able to play before I ran into a brick wall of inexplicable CTDs while trying to level up via the pipboy, but last night I took advantage of the Fallout 4 free weekend on Steam. I was adamant from the time the game originally came out a few years back that under no circumstance would I give Bethesda any of my money, so this is about as close as I'll ever come to owning the game.

As Bethesda is wont to do, the game begins with an introductory sequence which straight up tells you who your character is. From the very beginning you feel like you have to pick certain dialogues because otherwise it makes no sense (unless the protagonist is a schizophrenic, which he might be given how many times he says "no" and apparently means "sure, why not"); that is, when you can actually see what that dialogue is going to be. We start off with a couple of robots looking in a mirror, and you get to choose what the robots will look like. Every time you change something about one robot's face, both it and its fellow robot will comment on the change. After a few hundred "there's the handsome man I married"s and "I clean up pretty good"s I realised that, short of picking an entirely different preset to start with, there was very little I could do to make the man-robot not look like Jon Bernthal's derpy brother, and gave up. I didn't even bother with the woman-robot, and it would have been more than a small waste of time* given that she is shot by some dudes about five minutes later. Even if she hadn't been, everyone except the protagonist is killed by Totally Not Hal 9000 during cryosleep. Yeah, the vaults have cryopods for no apparent reason, other than they really wanted to have the opening sequence be the day the bombs fell, and yet have you play the same guy in 2288 or whatever.

But before that, before the robots shape-shifting and making the same three comments about it over and over in the bathroom, we of course have war. And you know what they say, war never changes. Oh my god. Three times this monotonous goon spouts the catchphrase in the first couple of minutes, and whoever directed the voice over clearly did not learn the Pinter pause lesson—if you tell the actor to pause, they will do it for too long. The space between "war" and "war never changes" must be something like five full seconds, the longest comma there ever was. And it's not like you don't know what he's about to say. There's nothing deep about it at this stage, if ever there was. It beggars belief. Not even Ron Perlman could have saved this pile.

Eventually getting to play the game, which in my experience consisted mostly of punching cockroaches and looking for secrets that weren't there (Dark Souls really has spoiled me with the amount of shortcuts and hidden items it places about the map to reward exploration—I scoured every inch of Vault 111 looking for stuff, and even in the most clearly-a-secret kind of nooks and crannies there was nothing. At the same time, item placement retains the seemingly random feel of its predecessor. I found grenades in a fucking trash can.), it didn't seem too bad. Immediately combat felt much smoother and more intuitive than in Fallout 3. VATS now operates more like a crowd control tool than the primary mode of combat, which in an FPS/action shooter type presentation it absolutely should be. The default mouse and keyboard controls felt a little counterintuitive; V, which used to be the VATS button, now switches out to over-the-shoulder perspective, which is basically useless for anything other than watching your man-robot awkwardly jerk his way around the all too familiar scenery. Also, I don't know if this was because of my stats or what, but whenever I jumped I got air time like I was on the Moon.

The dog companion, a staple of the series from its inception, is back. Working with it was somewhat uncomfortable. At first I took it for a mob and tried to pick it off from a distance, but when it didn't aggro I realised what it really was. The control interface for the dog is a little confusing. Telling it to "follow", which I took to mean "follow me", caused it to run towards the centre of the screen like a cursor tracking animation from one of those crappy "make your own super cool website for free!!!" services from back in the day. Given that "stay" works much as you'd expect, I thought I must have been hitting some other button by mistake to get it to do the weird things it was doing, but no, it just isn't very well explained. The dog can open doors and fetch items, but it seems like kind of a waste of time given that the dog gets there no quicker than you do, and the means of navigating the dog to the desired item is so clunky that you might as well just go and get it yourself.

I touched a little on the way the game handles dialogue earlier, and it does definitely seem like what was annoying to look at in the pre-release gameplay footage is just as bad if not worse to actually play with. Each conversation point consists of you clicking on one of four preset options, none of which actually indicates what you're going to say. I thought the "yes" "no" "sarcastic" thing was a joke, but it really is that unclear. Like, it's nowhere near as wildly misleading as the "truth" "doubt" "lie" mechanic could be in L.A. Noire, but I don't feel like this "role-playing game" is actually allowing me to role-play in any real sense, because all the information I would need in order to be able to do it is hidden. During your side of the conversation, the camera inexplicably jumps out of first person perspective so that you can see the man-robot trying and failing to activate its expression module. It's a minor annoyance sitting like icing on top of a cake made of shit, but why on earth they decided to have the camera do that is beyond me.

When at last I had shot and killed enough random bugs and reached the impasse of a core mechanic not wanting to work, I gave up and uninstalled the game files. What little I experienced did not make me feel particularly sore about this, and I had no desire to see where the story would lead. You're a man-robot and you go to the vault with your wife-robot and baby Shaun (who I'm pretty sure is a changeling because he looks Hispanic while his "parents" are the two most lilywhite robot folks you've ever seen), the vault people put you in cryosleep and then some time later a bald man opens wife-robot's cryopod, shoots her with a gun that leaves no wound or bleeding (clearly owing to the synthetic self-repairing skin in which "her" cold metal interior is clad!) and steals the baby. Some time later still you are thawed and let out, you steal your dead wife-robot's jewellery and head outside, punching cockroaches and being near-blinded repeatedly by a series of progressively brighter lights, determined to find your baby. Yes, that's right, the tables have turned (in a wroooooong way, ya got me... mad now), in a clever twist on Bethesda's previous narrative impetus it is now the father that must find the son! And so you return to your home, literally down the street from the vault, find your trusty robot servant, who kills all the enemies in the area while you stuff your pockets with random garbage, and then you go off to the next place, find the dog and and presumably do more of the same. Alas, on the outskirts of Concord was my time in post-nuclear Massachusetts unceremoniously foreshortened.

I can't help but feel like I would have been more interested in a Fallout experience where I was one part of a family learning how to survive in the post-apocalyptic future as a team. That way, if the wife had been killed and the son abducted during the course of my playthrough, I might actually have felt something. Todd Howard or whoever wrote this (Emil Pagliarulo?) really wanted me to feel something, but all he did was prevent me from talking to someone who stared at me in a bathroom one time a few minutes ago, and took away a strange baby-thing which I have no connection to and literally had to be forced to interact with previously. In a toss-up between baby-thing being taken and Liam Neeson being taken (ha), I'll take (ha ha) Neeson—at the very least I had time to form some kind of connection to his character, however tenuous. So it's a mixed bag compared to the previous offering. I definitely prefer the feel of combat in this game to Fallout 3, and obviously it is a better looking game, but this second attempt at a dramatic Heart-Wrenching Personal Story™ is even worse than the first. Maybe it gets better and more compelling the further you go, but I'm pretty confident that isn't the case.

Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #827 on: February 02, 2018, 07:39:45 PM »
Yeah...
You didn't see the musket laser rifle.  Imagine a laser rifle that does shit damage and you have to take 5 seconds to reload after every shot.

That's your first gun.  Oh and you gotta kill a museum filled with gang members with it.

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #828 on: February 02, 2018, 09:44:26 PM »
Yeah...
You didn't see the musket laser rifle.  Imagine a laser rifle that does shit damage and you have to take 5 seconds to reload after every shot.

That's your first gun.  Oh and you gotta kill a museum filled with gang members with it.

Are you sure about that? There's a 10mm pistol and a bunch of ammo in the vault. I found three other pistols not long after exiting the vault as well. I don't know if they patched it since you played it but it seemed to be pretty generous with weapons, at least on normal difficulty.

Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #829 on: February 02, 2018, 09:52:30 PM »
Yeah...
You didn't see the musket laser rifle.  Imagine a laser rifle that does shit damage and you have to take 5 seconds to reload after every shot.

That's your first gun.  Oh and you gotta kill a museum filled with gang members with it.

Are you sure about that? There's a 10mm pistol and a bunch of ammo in the vault. I found three other pistols not long after exiting the vault as well. I don't know if they patched it since you played it but it seemed to be pretty generous with weapons, at least on normal difficulty.
Oh right, I had forgotten about the pistol.

*

Offline beardo

  • *
  • Posts: 4482
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #830 on: February 03, 2018, 04:36:17 PM »
Unless you go straight to Concord, you can find a revolver not far from the Sanctuary settlement, and the raiders you kill in Concord right before you reach the museum will drop various pipe guns. On top of that, you can find a power armor, a fusion core and a minigun too in various locations just north-east of Sanctuary, so you can get all this stuff right from the get-go even if you don't stick to the main quest.
The Mastery.

*

Offline Ghost Spaghetti

  • *
  • Posts: 908
  • Don't look in that mirror. It's absolutely furious
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #831 on: February 05, 2018, 12:37:31 PM »
I role-played a distraught mother who returns to her house, mind mangled by grief and places a fire extinguisher in the crib because it's at least as animate as her potato-baby she lost.

There she sits, mad and alone with her fire extinguisher baby.

*

Offline StapleBattery

  • *
  • Posts: 1081
  • This is the line of division.
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #832 on: February 06, 2018, 05:38:16 PM »
Personally, I really enjoyed Fallout 4. The main story fell on its face a little near the end, but it was still pretty fun. Bethesda really fucked up with the Creation Club, though.
You just made my list, buddy.  >:(
this world does not have room for another mind as intelligent as yours.

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #833 on: February 09, 2018, 04:28:38 AM »
Finally got around to playing Dark Souls.
I've been playing a little bit every day. Managed to beat Capra Demon on my third try, and I only used the stairs to take care of the dogs. Feels good man.
Since then I've beaten Gaping Dragon (1st try), Moonlight Butterfly (1st try), and Havel (2nd try). Blighttown gave me a few problems, but I got down pretty much by falling accidentally onto the right platforms. I found the second bonfire and the Great Hollow (I got to the bonfire but I haven't actually done anything there), and am currently fighting Quelaag, who is giving me a bit of a time. I equipped Wanderer gear for fire resist but I haven't gotten her patterns down yet.

*

Offline Crudblud

  • *
  • Posts: 1560
  • A Most Respectable Gentleman
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #834 on: February 17, 2018, 06:07:46 PM »
Finally got around to playing Dark Souls.
I've been playing a little bit every day. Managed to beat Capra Demon on my third try, and I only used the stairs to take care of the dogs. Feels good man.
Since then I've beaten Gaping Dragon (1st try), Moonlight Butterfly (1st try), and Havel (2nd try). Blighttown gave me a few problems, but I got down pretty much by falling accidentally onto the right platforms. I found the second bonfire and the Great Hollow (I got to the bonfire but I haven't actually done anything there), and am currently fighting Quelaag, who is giving me a bit of a time. I equipped Wanderer gear for fire resist but I haven't gotten her patterns down yet.

After some trouble I finally defeated Ornstein and Smough. Have since defeated Sif and all the Demon Ruins bosses—I think I may have been overlevelled for all of them. I also went to Ariamis, but the dragon knocked me off the bridge and I somehow fell with great luck onto the underpass, meaning I was able to return to Anor Londo without having to do any boss fights. I'm not entirely sure what to do next, once you get the Lordvessel the whole thing seems to become a bit aimless. There's a bunch of places I could go but I'm not sure which are optional and which will progress the main quest.

*

Offline rooster

  • *
  • Posts: 3132
  • cock-a-doodle-doo, darlin'
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #835 on: February 24, 2018, 04:34:45 PM »
I've been playing a lot of Rollercoaster Tycoon Classic, apart from Diamond Heights' ramped up difficulty almost to the point of impossibility, it's quite nice. Brings me back to the days of dial-up internet and playing it on our ancient family computer.

Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #836 on: February 24, 2018, 05:25:41 PM »
played ~6 hours of the new stellaris update.  i like it a lot so far.

my least favorite change is that hyperlanes are now the only ftl drive.  i totally get why they did it; and, i have to admit that it's a net improvement to the gameplay.  i think i just hate that my ships have to traverse the whole system to get to a new hyperlane gate.  what i mean is: you ftl to a system, and then you have to fly across that whole system to get to another gate to jump to a new system.  it's slow.

my favorite change is the starbases.  tall empires are now viable.  and defense platforms are now actually useful.  it kicks ass.
I have visited from prestigious research institutions of the highest caliber, to which only our administrator holds with confidence.

*

Offline StapleBattery

  • *
  • Posts: 1081
  • This is the line of division.
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #837 on: March 01, 2018, 05:56:32 PM »
I've gotten back into Dark Souls with the Return to Drangleic event. Right now i'm looking for a fellow Sunbro to help the noobs with bosses and the like. Calling all Sunbros!
You just made my list, buddy.  >:(
this world does not have room for another mind as intelligent as yours.

*

Offline honk

  • *
  • Posts: 1425
  • resident goose
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #838 on: March 15, 2018, 02:43:07 AM »
I strongly disagree with regard to game mechanics. The game was Kickstarter'd as a spiritual successor to Baldur's Gate, and the people who actually threw money at it to let it happen wanted things that way. Tyranny didn't "fix" anything, it simply wasn't trying to target a very specific (and, I appreciate, peculiar) niche.

Besides, if you're not treating your party as a cohesive unit, you'd really struggle with any of the more challenging battles. If you *really* hate issuing commands, set up your party AI, allow them to use per-rest abilities, and enjoy burning a village's worth of camping supplies. Alternatively, hit that "Story Mode" button and auto-attack away - if you hate the game mechanically but love the story and characters, why would you not just make use of that?

I don't hate the game mechanics; I just feel that the level of micromanagement expected of you is a little crazy, as was the decision to not give you options to even somewhat mitigate the burden. You're essentially controlling six player characters at once. Even for a niche game inspired by the CRPGs of the late 90s/early 2000s, that's a lot to be laying on the player. It's great that you like it, and I'm sure plenty of other people did too, but a couple of options to tone it down just a bit wouldn't have been unwarranted.

I largely agree with you and Crudblud on L.A. Noire. One thing that I felt really hurt its story was the out-of-nowhere protagonist switch for the final act. It's not like Phelps had died or was no longer involved in the story. You just had to...play as somebody else from then on.

HITMAN

I've bothered Rushy enough about this on IRC; time to write a review. This game is great. It's broken down into six "episodes," with each one being set in a different area where you go in, kill your targets, and get out. These levels are the best part of the game. They're all visually distinctive, physically large, and complex enough to provide fun for several playthroughs. I especially love how there are always some places within them that have nothing, or almost nothing to do with the main objective. They're not useless, as you can find crazy weapons and goofy disguises in them, but you'd never visit them if you were just trying to kill your targets in the most direct way possible. The second level, set in the town of Sapienza, Italy, is the best example of this. Your targets are in a villa in the center of town, but there's also a nearby restaurant, the city hall, a beach full of tourists, a church, and a labyrinth of tunnels running under it all.

As great as these levels are, and as many different opportunities they provide for you to infiltrate your targets' inner circles and kill them in creative ways, there are only six of them. That's not enough for a full-sized game. I think I'd have been satisfied with two more. The game tries to provide a bit more content by giving you bonus missions set in slightly-altered versions of the existing levels, and they're fun, but the problem with trying to reuse the levels like that is that they were obviously designed with the main target's housing and protection first and foremost in mind. Infiltrating Sapienza's church simply can't compare with infiltrating its villa, just like infiltrating Marrakesh's shisha cafe is nothing next to infiltrating its embassy. Two other issues that I had were the main story, which was really dumb and added nothing to the game, and the fact that all the extras are voiced by a small handful of American and British voice actors.

I also have to mention that I love the enormous variety of skills and vocations that Agent 47 can demonstrate his proficiency in over the course of the game. This dude is an expert mechanic, sushi chef, model, masseur, yogi, rock musician, music producer, and therapist - and that's not even getting into the number of exotic weapons he can competently wield. It's so ridiculous that it quickly becomes hilarious, and I'm eagerly awaiting what insights the next "season" of this game will give us into 47's skillset. Will he sing an opera? Deliver a lecture on quantum physics? Rushy suggested he be at the UN and give a moving speech on world peace. My hope is that we see him impersonate a famous dancer and tear up the dance floor with his sweet moves.

Kingdom Come: Deliverance

This game is racist because it has no black people. 0/10
ur retartet but u donut even no it and i walnut tell u y

*

Offline Dither

  • *
  • Posts: 529
  • The night above the dingle starry,
    • View Profile
Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« Reply #839 on: March 27, 2018, 09:09:48 PM »
Anyone hit the high Sea of Thieves yet?
Watched some gameplay last night, looks fantastic, almost got seasick.


A lie will make it around the world before the truth has time to put on its shoes.