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Offline stack

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Re: The Zig-Zaging Sun
« Reply #40 on: January 01, 2019, 12:21:51 PM »
I think it effectively says that here

Quote
Sine and cosine can be generated by projecting the tip of a vector onto the y-axis and x-axis as the vector rotates about the origin

But even if I have interpreted that wrongly, you’ve linked to a page about circuits and electrical engineering. Why would the omission of that information add any weight to this debate. And like many things debated on here, this is not something one can debate. The observation is that the sun makes a sine wave in the sky near the Poles in their summer, the globe earth mode can predict and explain that observation (whether you understand that explanation is irrelevant), what is the FE explanation?

Please find a link about sines which says anything like you are describing.

All links describing sines show a 2D circle. If the horizon had no obstructions and the sun were horizontal to you, with it's bottom edge sliding across the horizon at all times, neither increasing or decreasing it's altitude, on a 2D plane just as the sine illustrations imply, how does the sine wave apply at all?

Sine is a mathematical function used for an entirely different purpose, not for this purpose. It appears that some here may be performing creative thinking in the spirit of theoretical rivelry.

All fine and good and kind of 'whatever' at this point. But you're sort of, kind of, actually, completely, dodging the question at hand. In this observation, on a flat earth, why is the Sun bobbing up and down, changing altitudes? What part of FET explains this phenomena?
Not much is known about the celestial bodies and their distances.

shootingstar

Re: The Zig-Zaging Sun
« Reply #41 on: January 01, 2019, 12:57:36 PM »
Sounds like your question asking the same thing as I did this morning under my FET Seasons' thread.  Why exactly does the Suns distance from a point over the North Pole vary?  Toms only reply so far is that the mechanism is 'unknown'.

Offline edby

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Re: The Zig-Zaging Sun
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2019, 01:41:08 PM »
Please find a link about sines which says anything like you are describing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position_of_the_Sun

Sine is a mathematical function used for an entirely different purpose, not for this purpose.
Incorrect.

Offline edby

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Re: The Zig-Zaging Sun
« Reply #43 on: January 01, 2019, 02:55:02 PM »
Actually this page is better

https://www.pveducation.org/pvcdrom/properties-of-sunlight/elevation-angle

Use the formula for 'elevation angle' for any latitude, hour of day and 'declination' (which corresponds to season).

You can easily reproduce this in a spreadsheet and perfectly replicate the 'zig zag' effect.

I think Tom will object that assume 'patterns'. Well fine, we can deal with that later but the question was whether the elevation has anything to do with the sin function.

YES IT DOES!

[EDIT] Actually that formula is well worth playing around with. Put in a declination angle of 23.49, meaning you are at the winter spring solstice in northern hemisphere, and put in a latitude of 66.567 (i.e. the latitude of the arctic circle). Then the bottom of the sine wave just touches the horizon. If you then head further north the wave gets shallower and shallower until at 90 degrees it is a straight line.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2019, 03:21:22 PM by edby »