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Messages - honk

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1
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 21, 2024, 09:23:19 PM »
Impressive. Biden has been out of the race only a few hours and the narrative has already switched from "Biden is the worst possible candidate the Democrats could be running, they're crazy to go with him" to "Biden was the best possible candidate the Democrats could be running, they're crazy to let him drop out."

2
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 21, 2024, 08:30:15 PM »
There's no point in arguing with him. We'll just have to wait until the thing he's insisting can't happen inevitably ends up happening, and then he'll probably say "haha trole u!" Anyway, I wasn't expecting this, but of course it's good news. I'd still bet that Trump wins, though. He's in a much stronger spot to win than he was in 2020.

3
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 16, 2024, 03:59:24 PM »
It's far from clear-cut that applying for or accepting a pardon constitutes an admission of guilt. That idea comes from a line of dicta from an old case where it was originally meant in a different context, and a federal court fairly recently rejected that interpretation. And even it were firmly established that accepting a plea bargain constituted an admission of guilt, why would Congress impreach him for that? They don't have to impeach him if they don't want to, and I think Republicans have made it very clear by now that they will stand behind Trump no matter what he says or does.

But of course, he doesn't really need a pardon. Once he's the president, he can make all of his federal charges go away, and even if he's immediately followed by a president who's willing to resume the prosecutions, it'll be years before they can bring charges against him again. Honestly, even if Trump loses the election, I think it's very likely he'll be able to continue to postpone his trials until either he dies or the government figures he's too old to be worth prosecuting. The Supreme Court have shown that they're willing to play along with Trump's ridiculous delay tactics.

4
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 15, 2024, 06:48:10 PM »
A good chance? Trump is definitely winning. I was pretty sure he would after the debate, and now I'm entirely sure.

5
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 14, 2024, 06:56:18 PM »
Oh, don't mind me; that was for the benefit of everyone else. But go ahead, feel free to donut/walnut to your heart's content.

6
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 14, 2024, 05:58:01 PM »
This'll be a shock, guys, but Rushy is talking out of his ass. Of course it's possible to replace Biden with a viable candidate on the ballot:

https://www.cnn.com/2024/07/11/politics/biden-replacement-process-dnc/index.html

7
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 14, 2024, 04:29:05 PM »
The last thing you should be hoping for if you want to see the end of MAGA is Trump as a martyr.

idk if you're trolling or you legitimately think accelerationism is a good idea but you need to stop lmao

MAGA will never end during any of our lifetimes, and Trump will be seen as a martyr by his fans regardless of whether he's assassinated, dies peacefully in his sleep, or slips on a banana peel and breaks his neck in front of a million witnesses. And no matter what Trump achieves during the rest of his life, he will always be telling his fans that he's angry, that he's been victimized, and that he wants revenge. He will never say that he feels satisfied with his life and career and he's ready to retire and enjoy his last few years in peace. So to his fans, Trump's eventual death will be seen as him being prematurely struck down before he could truly settle the score. Whether or not that leads to violence is unfortunately up to them, not me, but if it does have to happen, I'd prefer it to be sooner rather than later.

8
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 14, 2024, 12:35:04 PM »
we had have had great news.
DEI in action.

In this context, "we'd" is a contraction of "we would." It's not an unusual phrase.

Damn it, just a little better aim and we'd have had great news.

I dunno, I mean... What would his raving supporters do if their leader was murdered by the only one with motive(they think): Biden and liberals?
Lots and lots of violence. 

It'd be worth it.

9
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 14, 2024, 08:12:14 AM »
Damn it, just a little better aim and we'd have had great news.

10
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 13, 2024, 09:10:42 PM »
I don’t care about the verbal slip-ups

That's weird, because a lot of other people do care about the embarrassing headlines.

::)

11
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 06, 2024, 03:41:02 AM »
Yes, of course by that Biden meant he was going to jizz in the overflow room. It's not like the word "come" has another meaning that's far more commonly meant and one that would have made much more sense in context. The only possible interpretation of that line is that Biden was announcing his intention to plaster the overflow room with his splooge.

12
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 06, 2024, 01:26:52 AM »
It looks to me like he meant to say that he beat Trump in 2020, and will beat him again in 2024, but mixed up what he was about to say in his head and accidentally said that he'll beat him again in 2020. I really don't think these verbal missteps are a big deal.

13
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 02, 2024, 10:05:00 PM »
The dissent would disagree.

https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/23pdf/23-939_e2pg.pdf (page 68)

I'm not going to go through the dissent line by line to see what I agree with and what I don't. However, it's obvious that doing anything drastic like declaring himself a dictator or assassinating a rival falls outside of the president's duties and would not be legally protected. Neither, for that matter, would hoarding classified documents or arranging a fraudulent scheme to stay in office after losing an election. There was already an obvious understanding that Trump was not being prosecuted for simply doing his job. This ruling simply invents a redundant legal controversy and creates a new hoop for the prosecution to jump through. It's a cowardly ruling that comes entirely down to their fear of actually having to make a definitive ruling on whether or not Trump can be prosecuted rather than any real constitutional concerns, and it's giving Trump exactly the delay he wanted, but I don't think it actually changes anything about what the president is or isn't allowed to do. In that respect, I partially agree with Action80, although it's interesting that he apparently interprets Trump and the Court wasting everyone's time to be a good thing.

14
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: July 01, 2024, 08:06:22 PM »
That's not it at all. The Court - that is to say, its conservative majority - don't want to be the ones to officially say that Trump definitively can or can't be prosecuted, so they're playing for time by kicking the case back to the lower courts with a vague ruling that settles nothing. Unfortunately, this is entirely to Trump's benefit, as the whole point of his frivolous appeal was to buy enough time to be reelected. The Court have now given him that time.

15
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: July 01, 2024, 04:35:31 AM »
There are plenty of well-known, viable Democrats who could have run if Biden had chosen not to run for reelection, like Gavin Newsom, Gretchen Whitmer, or Pete Buttigieg. The problem is that I highly suspect these ambitious, well-known Democrats won't want to be simply handed the nomination at the convention instead of campaigning for it and properly winning it like every other official party nominee has done. Getting into office simply because they were the last-minute replacement for Biden on the ticket would hurt their mandate and overall legacy. I could almost see a largely unknown figure, someone who ordinarily would have had no plans of running for president, taking the nomination and running against Trump on the grounds that they're, well, not Trump. I doubt the convention would want to take a risk on an unknown, though.

16
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: June 30, 2024, 02:26:37 PM »
We have a two-party system where each party nominates one candidate. Wanting the party to nominate a different candidate does not mean anyone is opposed to free and fair elections.

17
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: June 30, 2024, 03:05:59 AM »
The only vague silver lining is there's still a long time till the election so Biden could recover from this but I can't see how he's going to suddenly perform better in the next 5 months.

Biden has his good days and his bad days, as you'd expect from someone his age. The problem isn't necessarily that Biden is incapable of doing well in a debate, but that he won't have the opportunity to show he can until September, and by then, his performance in the first debate will already be permanently ingrained in many Americans' minds.

It is untrue.
And it’s exactly the sort of bullshit Trump comes out with routinely.
And you lap it up like the hood cult member you are. Or maybe you know he’s full of shit and just don’t care.

The difference is, though, Trump's fans don't want or expect logical policy proposals or coherent political positions from him. What Trump's fans love about him are the entertainment and the very broad and vaguely-defined resentment he indulges in. Whether or not the things he says are true or even make sense aren't a big part of the equation. What matter are the vibes. Trump could tell his fans a bonkers story about him wrestling purple elephants on Uranus and they would cheer for him as enthusiastically as ever as long as they got the impression that the elephants were part of the system keeping him - and by extension, them - down.

I'm not saying it's fair. It's deeply unfair that one candidate is a serious politician whose words are scrutinized and the other is a clown whose fans want and expect to spew nonsense. But it's the reality. Trump and Biden simply aren't in the same business.

18
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: June 28, 2024, 03:48:24 PM »
Last night was Sleepy Joe at his sleepiest. Sad! But yeah, I think the writing's on the wall for the election now. The Democrats won't replace Biden unless he asks for it, and he won't.

19
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: June 20, 2024, 05:18:14 PM »
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/trump-now-openly-threatening-ceos-200153707.html

Trump says CEOs who aren't with him should be fired.  Because threatening people who don't whorship him is totally a normal thing. >_>

"In two long Truth Social posts on Tuesday quoting a Wall Street Journal article,..."

Seems Trump didn't say it...he quoted the paper.

The paper was relating the news that corporate tax rates under Biden would be raised from 21% to 28%.

It seems the author(s) of the article are the ones who believe CEO's should be fired if this happens.

I believe the CEO's should be fired if it happens.

Why did you cosign a lie?

Is it just normal for you?

If you had taken the time to follow the links in the article instead of just assuming, you would have seen that no, the WSJ were not the ones who called for anyone to be fired, Trump was.

I don't think this is even especially newsworthy. It's a dog-bites-man story. It is interesting, however, how regularly Trump fans convince themselves that he's one of them, a common man up against the elite, when he so regularly demonstrates that he's entirely on the side of rich people and big business.

20
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« on: June 18, 2024, 03:26:20 PM »
Maybe, but that's the most recent figure I found, taken from one of his arrests last year.

Which means nothing more than Trump claimed to weigh that much. He's obviously lying, just like he's obviously lying about his height. Trump's height and weight won't be accurately recorded unless he's actually convicted and sent to prison.

The fact that you guys had to post a video which starts with Trump in the middle of a story discredits your claim.

Biden's gaffs are a continual stream of national embarrassment.



Nobody is denying that Trump was in the middle of a story. Like I said, I don't think it's a big deal that Trump is entertaining his followers at a rally with nonsense about sharks and batteries, but simply pointing out that he was in the middle of a story doesn't actually address the primary criticism of his story being completely bonkers.

It's also pretty funny that you're complaining about missing context, and then you link to a video that's just a compilation of various isolated verbal stumbles taken from a number of Biden's speeches. You could make anyone in the world sound like an idiot if you compiled every "um" and "uh" they uttered over the course of a week into one video.

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