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Messages - Iceman

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1
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 12, 2021, 01:04:48 PM »
Yes that's great, the more quotes we can get from Dr. Quinn the better :) hes smarter than all of us on the matter!

"Could these unresolved discrepancies in G hide some new physics? This seems unlikely. I believe undiscovered systematic errors in all or some of these new experiments is the answer — G is difficult to measure but it should not be too difficult!"
- from the nature piece linked above

Now someone else's turn!

2
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 12, 2021, 11:52:26 AM »
...Terence Quinn is a British physicist who spent many years studying gravity and was emeritus director of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures. If he says it, it's golden.

Okay great, he said this in a nature piece:
"Who needs a more accurate numerical value of G (the current recommended value is 6.67408 ± 0.00031 × 10−11 kg−1 m3 s−2)? The short answer is, nobody, for the moment..."

https://www.nature.com/articles/nphys3651?proof=t


 I guess were done here?

3
Keep in mind a few things we can know about the moon, based solely on Earth-based observations.

Its solid and its made of rock and dust. We know this because new impact craters have been observed, which are surrounded by radially-symmetric trails of material ejected from the crater at the time of impact.

Another thing we know is that rock and dust dont emit light at standard temperatures. We know the moon's surface is below the melting point of rock because we observe the phases of the moon which are caused by the shadow created from sunlight.

If the moon were to emit its own cool light, it would need to have a mechanism to cast a shadow in itself as well.

Radiative cooling and thermal retention is a pretty simple explanation that doesnt require a new understanding of several other things we can observe, which is a major plus :)

4
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 11, 2021, 11:32:22 PM »

I quoted this as Quinn saying that he can't measure gravity:

“It’s not a thing one likes to leave unresolved, we should be able to measure gravity.”

“The Newtonian constant of gravitation, a constant too difficult to measure?”

You denied this and quoted this from Quinn in your defense:

"measuring G is hard, but we should be able to do better"

That's the best you could provide. A statement that it's hard and they need to do better isn't a statement that he's doing it. You are the person playing semantic word games here, attempting to warp clear statements with vain interpretations. You are stamping your feet and just can't accept being wrong.  ::)

You keep using the same quote of Dr Quinn, take from the Sci. Am. and Futurism articles.

It has been pointed out that Dr. Quinn, and the other physicists quoted on both articles, have had much more to say on the matter of measuring G than the few words you keep regurgitating ad nasuem. I would recommend that you (and anyone else reading through this mess of a thread) look up what the scientists say on the matter themselves, in their peer-reviewed publications.

From Dr Quinn:
"Who needs a more accurate numerical value of G (the current recommended value is 6.67408 ± 0.00031 × 10−11 kg−1 m3 s−2)? The short answer is, nobody, for the moment..."

"Could these unresolved discrepancies in G hide some new physics? This seems unlikely. I believe undiscovered systematic errors in all or some of these new experiments is the answer — G is difficult to measure but it should not be too difficult!"

Excerpts from : https://www.nature.com/articles/nphys3651?proof=t

Or go to Dr. Speake's google Scholar profile and look up the work hes done since his PhD, including recent developmental of new methodologies to mimic a torsion balance experiment while limiting external sources of noise from ground movements due to farfield seismic vibration.

Do the same for all the physicists in the articles described here, and in the wiki. Decide for yourself what the experts have to say.

5
Moonlight does nothing.

Being in 'moonshade' just means something lies beneath an insulator of some sort, and therefore latent heat that was stored up through a day's worth of solar radiation, doesnt escape from those spots as easily as open areas.

Moonlight 'coolness' is a classic example of the importance of understanding correlation vs. causation :)

6
Yes, well, the moon is a rock orbiting us and the sun is a giant thermonuclear reactor. I dont know much else though because I, too, am allergic to google.

7
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 11, 2021, 05:51:00 PM »
And yet physicists, metrologists, and amateur experimenters constantly get values right around the reported value, just with a spread that exceeds the uncertainty ranges calculated for individual results and they (the former two groups) are constantly developing new ways to investigate and minimize the sources of the uncertainty.

8
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: May 11, 2021, 03:15:00 PM »
Exactly. A government should pay people enough to live. A company should pay employees enough to have a life.

Minimum wage should reflect the ability for someone to have a life, just as it did back when America was 'great'. Currently theres little motivation for someone to go get a minimum wage job, and very little capacity for people to 'pull themselves up by their bootstraps' to reuse the old trope.

9
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: May 11, 2021, 12:20:10 PM »
Everyone wants to be pampered thinks they deserve a living wage is more accurate.
FTFY

Why would anyone with a kid go back to work to make a couple hundred bucks more a month, but then have to pay hundreds more for childcare, when they could stay at home, make more net income and spend time with their family? The fact that people are spinning this as 'lazy workers' instead of 'corporate greed and an unlivable minimum wage' is kind of amazing to watch

10
Flat Earth Community / Re: i dont understand someone help please
« on: May 11, 2021, 12:10:50 PM »
You guys really need to stop quoting entire blocks of threads. It makes this beyond stupid to try to read...

11
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: May 10, 2021, 09:40:43 PM »
The free market is great for CEO's until they're forced to compete for labor. Seeing the product of ridiculous lack of wage growth compared to productivity and it's a little bit hilarious.

12
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 10, 2021, 08:31:36 PM »
Yes there is noise in the data. And the spread of the data outside the reported error bars for each measurement is cause for further investigation of the sources of noise, and identifying potential human error and or experimental design flaws that are contributing to this pack of precision.

Let's now take this more recent physicist you're quoting, Clive Speake. Does he think gravity can't be measured or that it isnt real? No. He's involved in more recent work to improve big G's measurement, since that flurry of discussion in 2014 following Quinn's groups measurement of G.

From Physics Letters A, vol. 382: Speake and Collins: "Torsion balances with fibres of zero length"

Here Speake describes a new method of simulating a torsion balance using electrostatic charges or magnetic superconductors. This has the effect of limiting ground noise, and reducing the effective distance of force being measured to <50micrometers.

Doesnt sound like someone who's given up on gravity.

13
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 10, 2021, 01:19:44 PM »
Action and TB keep quoting half a sentence from Dr. Quinn in the Sci. Am and Futurism articles, but if you take 30 seconds and look up what Dr. Quinn does for a living, what he has published himself, and the projects he's been involved in, the ridiculousness of this repeated exchange is plainly obvious.


Some additional quotes from Dr. Quinn (originally quoted from the Sci. Am. Article above) from a short note he wrote in Nature:

"Who needs a more accurate numerical value of G (the current recommended value is 6.67408 ± 0.00031 × 10−11 kg−1 m3 s−2)? The short answer is, nobody, for the moment..."

"Could these unresolved discrepancies in G hide some new physics? This seems unlikely. I believe undiscovered systematic errors in all or some of these new experiments is the answer — G is difficult to measure but it should not be too difficult!"

Excerpts from : https://www.nature.com/articles/nphys3651?proof=t


Side note, Dr. Quinn isnt an astrophysicist by man is he ever qualified for that work! Very impressive resume.


14
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: May 10, 2021, 03:02:23 AM »
That post wrecked havoc on my eyes and brain.

15
Flat Earth Investigations / Re: Cavendish experiment
« on: May 09, 2021, 02:30:24 AM »
Some additional quotes from Dr. Quinn (originally quoted from the Sci. Am. Article above) from a short note he wrote in Nature:

"Who needs a more accurate numerical value of G (the current recommended value is 6.67408 ± 0.00031 × 10−11 kg−1 m3 s−2)? The short answer is, nobody, for the moment..."

"Could these unresolved discrepancies in G hide some new physics? This seems unlikely. I believe undiscovered systematic errors in all or some of these new experiments is the answer — G is difficult to measure but it should not be too difficult!"

Excerpts from : https://www.nature.com/articles/nphys3651?proof=t


Side note, Dr. Quinn isnt an astrophysicist by man is he ever qualified for that work! Very impressive resume.


16
Flat Earth Theory / Re: Isostasy
« on: May 08, 2021, 01:32:18 PM »
I'll ask for a third time; can you actually put up two quotes side by side, one from the geologist in the Wiki and another from another geologist and show a statement which is directly contradicted by another?

It appears that you can't do that. Since you can't do that I don't see what more there is to discuss on this.

I'll make you a deal.  If anyone thinks I haven't addressed both the wiki page's author's views and the quoted Geologist's assertions, as well as any potential misrepresentations of current understanding of isostasy by providing old and modern peer-reviewed sources and simple analogies, then I will break it down further.

At present I see no need to add to what was already provided in the OP. On the other hand, if there is anything in the OP that you find incorrect, or an unfair characterization, feel free to point them out and we can proceed that way.

17
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Coronavirus Vaccine and You
« on: May 07, 2021, 09:31:40 PM »
No, this is The Cure.

18
Flat Earth Theory / Re: Isostasy
« on: May 07, 2021, 12:10:10 AM »
That's fine, anyone else reading might see the quotes I supplied from Hissink, then the quoted portions of abstracts from a journal article, followed by examples of modern GPS monitoring compared to older (postglacial) crustal rebound in formerly glaciated areas.

19
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: President Joe Biden
« on: May 06, 2021, 01:40:27 AM »
Yep, Trump's signature put the cherry on top, but both moves are shite sammiches still.

20
Flat Earth Community / Re: i dont understand someone help please
« on: May 05, 2021, 09:42:42 PM »
Or to help bridge the gap, you could also take a gander at things from Mawson Research station, at a longitude halfway between Perth and Cape Town
https://www.antarctica.gov.au/antarctic-operations/webcams/mawson/

Or any of the other research stations but I used that one as an example here because of its location, and because the Aussie antarctic survey is cited in the FES wiki for other southern hemisphere phenomena, so it is (in theory) a trusted source.

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