Offline 3DGeek

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Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« on: November 14, 2017, 01:30:43 PM »
We're told that the sun casts a "flashlight" beam onto the surface of the FE (although in the bipolar map - this cannot possibly be true).

What about the moon?   Moonlight also does not illuminate the world after the moon has crossed the horizon...so do we also have a "flashlight" moon?

Seems kinda logical...but it's not mentioned anyplace.   So if not - why not?
Hey Tom:  What path do the photons take from the physical location of the sun to my eye at sunset?

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2017, 01:42:34 AM »
Where does it say that the sun's light is a "flashlight" beam?

Offline mtnman

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Re: Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 02:13:35 AM »
Tom, have you not seen the animation on the wiki? It shows the sun spinning around the north pole (for some reason) and only lighting a small portion of the Earth, looking like the effect you get shinning a flashlight towards the ground.

Maybe nobody used the word "flashlight", but that is a good description of what your animation shows. ("Your" referring to the content of the site, not you personally of course")

I have read many of the convoluted explanations of how sunsets works, they mostly seem to be explained from the observers point of view. Has any FE believer every really explained it from an outside view?

Maybe the way to ask the question is this: If the sun radiates light in all directions, some distance from the Earth, what happens to the light that left the sun heading towards the far side of the flat Earth? Shouldn't light heading outward in all directions reach every part of the disk at all times?

It can't be explained with a lack of intensity. If the sun was above your opposite point on the far side of the disk Earth, it would be at most about 4 times farther away from you. Light decreases with the inverse square of the distance. If it was 4 times further away from you, you would see 1/16th of the light. That is still quite bright. I experienced the total solar eclipse a few months ago. When the sun was eclipsed in the upper 90 percentiles it was still too bright to look at directly.

Offline Mark_1984

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Re: Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 04:06:13 AM »
Where does it say that the sun's light is a "flashlight" beam?

Quote from your Wiki
Quote
As an analogy for the enlarging of the sun at sunset, lets imagine that we are in a dark room with a flashlight. We shine the light upon the wall, creating a distinct circle of light.


The sun shines light in all directions.

Oops, Tom hasn’t been paying attention in class  :P

Offline mtnman

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Re: Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2017, 05:23:41 AM »
Where does it say that the sun's light is a "flashlight" beam?

Quote from your Wiki
Quote
As an analogy for the enlarging of the sun at sunset, lets imagine that we are in a dark room with a flashlight. We shine the light upon the wall, creating a distinct circle of light.


The sun shines light in all directions.

Oops, Tom hasn’t been paying attention in class  :P
Nice catch Mark!

Offline 3DGeek

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Re: Does the moon also cast a "flashlight" beam?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2017, 04:41:53 PM »
Where does it say that the sun's light is a "flashlight" beam?

Sorry - I should have made it clear that I was asking FE'ers who actually believe what all of the Wiki stuff says.

You still can't explain where the sun is when it's midnight over Africa and daylight in the USA and China:



...so I wouldn't expect a decent explanation from you.
Hey Tom:  What path do the photons take from the physical location of the sun to my eye at sunset?