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Offline Jay_brown47

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Water down a plug hole?
« on: June 28, 2016, 03:35:51 PM »
Hey guys,

I'm new member and I'm pretty sure someone will answer this quick or point me in the right direction. I am newly a believer of flat earth and I have watched endless videos and done much research and as many people say, things just don't sit right. However, at work the other day one of my colleagues mentioned whilst in a flat earth discussion, "What about when water spins in the northern hemisphere one way and in the southern the other? I haven't heard anything regarding this anywhere. I'm sure I've just missed! Can someone help?

Thanks in advance

Jay
Kind Regards

Jay Brown
business@james-brown.org.uk

Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2016, 03:40:33 PM »
That is called the corriolis effect and it's largely a myth as the layman understands it.

Water doesn't spin when going down a drain differently but hurricanes do.

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Offline Luke 22:35-38

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 03:30:08 AM »
As a round earther that's a myth. You need special conditions to witness it. However the Coriolis does affect hurricanes.
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2016, 05:13:15 AM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.
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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2016, 05:37:10 AM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.
What have you done? Joined the "Dark Side"? With your:
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2016, 12:42:19 PM »
I'm back, baby!
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2016, 01:09:38 PM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.

It is just the same a myth that water goes down the drain in different directions according to hemisphere just because it requires such strongly controlled conditions (it's not something that one would observe in a normal tub or toilet, and therefore easily observable to everybody, yet that is the claim that is made) .
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2016, 04:21:42 PM »
Gotcha.  Yes, I agree that toilet/sink swirl due to Coriolis effect is a myth.
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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2016, 04:59:13 AM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.

It is just the same a myth that water goes down the drain in different directions according to hemisphere just because it requires such strongly controlled conditions (it's not something that one would observe in a normal tub or toilet, and therefore easily observable to everybody, yet that is the claim that is made) .
So why do hurricanes rotates counterclockwise and cyclones clockwise? The dividing line is the equator, not the path of the sun.

They say the exception proves the rule, don't they?

Map of the cumulative tracks of all tropical cyclones during the 1985–2005 time period.
I think a very weak typhoon, I guess it would be, started near India and wandered before wandering back and weakening, before fading out just south of the equator - no Coriolis to keep it spinning I guess!

A little telling that the band with virtually no tropical storms is centred on the equator, not the sun's path as some flat earthers have claimed (not on this site as far as I know). 
During summer in Australia we often have cyclones start well north of the sun's path near the Tropic of Capricorn.

Maybe Coriolis is real -  ::) or do you think it might be those massive "celestial gears" up there?  ::)

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2016, 06:00:10 AM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.

It is just the same a myth that water goes down the drain in different directions according to hemisphere just because it requires such strongly controlled conditions (it's not something that one would observe in a normal tub or toilet, and therefore easily observable to everybody, yet that is the claim that is made) .
So why do hurricanes rotates counterclockwise and cyclones clockwise? The dividing line is the equator, not the path of the sun.

I long ago posited the opinion that the effect is caused by subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons.  Coriolons apparently originate at the equator (though not necessarily from the surface) and very subtly affect the motion of fluids at or near the surface of the Earth (including high in the atmosphere, of course, and possibly deep in the very bowels of the Earth as well).
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Offline Jura-Glenlivet

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2016, 07:45:24 AM »


I long ago posited the opinion that the effect is caused by subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons.  Coriolons apparently originate at the equator (though not necessarily from the surface) and very subtly affect the motion of fluids at or near the surface of the Earth (including high in the atmosphere, of course, and possibly deep in the very bowels of the Earth as well).

Brilliant! I don't think I have laughed so much on here in months, which is unfair as I have a headache caused by sub-atomic particles called whiskions.
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2016, 08:36:46 AM »
So why do hurricanes rotates counterclockwise and cyclones clockwise? The dividing line is the equator, not the path of the sun.

I long ago posited the opinion that the effect is caused by subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons.  Coriolons apparently originate at the equator (though not necessarily from the surface) and very subtly affect the motion of fluids at or near the surface of the Earth (including high in the atmosphere, of course, and possibly deep in the very bowels of the Earth as well).

Interesting, when that great Flat Earth Scientist Tom Bishop ridicules the Globe because HE claims "RET predicts that “graviton particles” no one has ever seen are pulling objects towards the surface of the earth." Of course Globe does not "rely on gravitons", they are no more than a hypotheses for the cause of gravitation.

Now you postulate "subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons."
::) ;D ::) You really like taking the mickey out the Flat Earth!  ::) ;D ::)
Do you think that gravitons and coriolons might be in the same class of sub-etheric particle? I wonder if Tom has considered these coriolons.

And I love your signature!
;) We operate from experiment to experience here, and do not tolerate merely imagining how things would be in a perfect world.  ;)

PS I can't find details on your imaginative hypothesis!

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2016, 08:42:58 AM »


I long ago posited the opinion that the effect is caused by subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons.  Coriolons apparently originate at the equator (though not necessarily from the surface) and very subtly affect the motion of fluids at or near the surface of the Earth (including high in the atmosphere, of course, and possibly deep in the very bowels of the Earth as well).

Brilliant! I don't think I have laughed so much on here in months, which is unfair as I have a headache caused by sub-atomic particles called whiskions.

Do "whiskions" grow on the faces of one gender of humans are do they grow better in places like Pitlochry in Scotland fed on peat water and barley, coming in single malt etc.

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2016, 08:48:07 AM »
Do "whiskions" grow on the faces of one gender of humans are do they grow better in places like Pitlochry in Scotland fed on peat water and barley, coming in single malt etc.

You can trap them in glass bottles, much like vodkons, tequilions and scotchions.
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2016, 09:42:09 AM »
Do "whiskions" grow on the faces of one gender of humans are do they grow better in places like Pitlochry in Scotland fed on peat water and barley, coming in single malt etc.

You can trap them in glass bottles, much like vodkons, tequilions and scotchions.


Yes the Whiskion is a type of quark, as these are the only particles to have “flavour”, and are considered strange particles with half spin, this spin becoming more apparent the more you have and the later it gets, their interactions with gravity under these conditions can alternate between strong and weak, and the wave/particle duality can be influenced by orientation, the wave form taking over in the horizontal position with your eyes closed.
The Vodkon has less "flavor" so is more difficult to detect, tequilons have hats.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 01:37:49 PM by Jura-Glenlivet »
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2016, 09:55:31 AM »
Brilliant!
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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2016, 08:36:58 PM »
Not a myth.  It is however a very weak effect, easily overcome by any number of other effects.  The guys at Smarter Every Day and Veritasium have collaborated on a joint experiment, see it here.

It is just the same a myth that water goes down the drain in different directions according to hemisphere just because it requires such strongly controlled conditions (it's not something that one would observe in a normal tub or toilet, and therefore easily observable to everybody, yet that is the claim that is made) .
So why do hurricanes rotates counterclockwise and cyclones clockwise? The dividing line is the equator, not the path of the sun.

I long ago posited the opinion that the effect is caused by subatomic particles that we are yet to be able to observe called coriolons.  Coriolons apparently originate at the equator (though not necessarily from the surface) and very subtly affect the motion of fluids at or near the surface of the Earth (including high in the atmosphere, of course, and possibly deep in the very bowels of the Earth as well).

In all seriousness, it sounds like a fun theory. However, is there any reason why we should take it seriously when there is a much simpler theory (coriolis effect) that fits all observations nicely, and doesn't rely on a yet-to-be-observed particle?

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2016, 09:26:22 PM »
rely on a yet-to-be-observed particle?

So, like gravity, then?

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Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2016, 09:39:13 PM »
rely on a yet-to-be-observed particle?

So, like gravity, then?
Not you too? It's bad enough having Tom Bishop claim silly things like that. Gravitation is observable and measurable.

Gravity does not rely on a "yet-to-be-observed particle".
A "graviton" is just a postulated cause for the mechanism for gravitation acting at a distance.

If a graviton were to exist (and assuming is energy could be calculated in a similar fashion to that of photons) that energy would be so low as to make detection virtually impossible (down near Planck limit).
Quote from: B. P. Abbott et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration) (2016).
Recent observations of gravitational waves have put an upper bound of 1.2×10−22 eV/c2 on the graviton's mass.

Now about the that cause of the well verified Coriolis Effect?

Re: Water down a plug hole?
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2016, 09:40:14 PM »
rely on a yet-to-be-observed particle?

So, like gravity, then?

As gravity relates to quantum mechanics, yes. The reason they have to rely on an unobserved particle is because they have no simpler theory to fall back on to reconcile gravity with quantum mechanics. It may prove to be true, it may not. Only time will tell.

In our case, we do have a much simpler theory: the coriolis effect.