This post was on the frontpage of reddit. It is a time lapse that has been stabilized to the Milky Way. (Click on the post to see it in the smoother gifv format. Source for the image is in one of the comments.)



Notice the axis of rotation.

If the earth was flat, we would expect there to only be rotation around the vertical axis (like an airplane yawing). But this picture demonstrates rotation mostly around a horizontal axis (like an airplane rolling).

Just some more evidence to add to the already massive pile.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2016, 04:00:12 PM by TotesNotReptilian »

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Offline Tom Bishop

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If the earth was flat, we would expect there to only be rotation around the vertical axis

Why?
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

If the earth was flat, we would expect there to only be rotation around the vertical axis

Why?

That's how the model works, isn't it? Is there a flat earth model where the earth or stars don't rotate around the vertical axis?

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Offline Tom Bishop

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If the earth was flat, we would expect there to only be rotation around the vertical axis

Why?

That's how the model works, isn't it? Is there a flat earth model where the earth or stars don't rotate around the vertical axis?

What's wrong with the movement that can't occur on a Flat Earth?
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

Offline UnionsOfSolarSystemPlanet

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If the earth was flat, we would expect there to only be rotation around the vertical axis

Why?

That's how the model works, isn't it? Is there a flat earth model where the earth or stars don't rotate around the vertical axis?

What's wrong with the movement that can't occur on a Flat Earth?
Stars rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris in the North, rotate clockwise around the South celestial pole in the South and rise from the East and sets to the West near the equator. It looks like what we would seen in a rolling airplane where North as the head, South as the tail and equator as the passenger windows. On a unipolar map of a flat Earth, stars only rotate around 1 central pole, anyone in the equator or the opposite pole would see stars rotating at a vertical axis only. It would look like looking up on an airplane yawing. Bipolar map? How can stars magically reappear in the East after they set in the West?
The size of the Solar system if the Moon were only 1 pixel:
http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

Bipolar map? How can stars magically reappear in the East after they set in the West?

I'm not sure what you mean by this last sentence. The rest of your post is correct though.

What's wrong with the movement that can't occur on a Flat Earth?

1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll aileron roll)

2. The flat earth (or the stars/sun/moon) supposedly only rotates around a vertical axis. (Like a spinning top)

If you disagree with statement 2, please provide your alternative theory.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 06:51:20 PM by TotesNotReptilian »

Offline UnionsOfSolarSystemPlanet

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Bipolar map? How can stars magically reappear in the East after they set in the West?

I'm not sure what you mean by this last sentence. The rest of your post is correct though.
The bipolar map of flat Earth:

Could not explain how stars rise again in the Easter after setting in the West.
The size of the Solar system if the Moon were only 1 pixel:
http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

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Offline Tom Bishop

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1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll)

2. The flat earth (or the stars/sun/moon) supposedly only rotates around a vertical axis. (Like a spinning top)

If you disagree with statement 2, please provide your alternative theory.

Only a small portion of the sky can be seen at once, and if you look to the East the sun or a star can be seen to fall vertically into the horizon.
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll)

2. The flat earth (or the stars/sun/moon) supposedly only rotates around a vertical axis. (Like a spinning top)

If you disagree with statement 2, please provide your alternative theory.

Only a small portion of the sky can be seen at once, and if you look to the East the sun or a star can be seen to fall vertically into the horizon.

Correct on both counts. How are either of those things relevant though?

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Offline Tom Bishop

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1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll)

2. The flat earth (or the stars/sun/moon) supposedly only rotates around a vertical axis. (Like a spinning top)

If you disagree with statement 2, please provide your alternative theory.

Only a small portion of the sky can be seen at once, and if you look to the East the sun or a star can be seen to fall vertically into the horizon.

Correct on both counts. How are either of those things relevant though?

There is no reason for why a star cannot travel both horizontally or vertically in the sky.
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2016, 04:28:53 PM »
There is no reason for why a star cannot travel both horizontally or vertically in the sky.

You are still completely missing the point. Do you understand what an axis of rotation is? Do you understand the difference between roll and yaw?

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2016, 04:29:33 PM »
There is no reason for why a star cannot travel both horizontally or vertically in the sky.

You are still completely missing the point. Do you understand what an axis of rotation is? Do you understand the difference between roll and yaw?

What's impossible about either movement?
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2016, 09:31:58 PM »
What's impossible about either movement?

1. Flat earth models only include rotation around the vertical axis.
2. This image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis.

I am doing my best to explain this in the most simplistic way possible. Which of the above statements do you not agree with or understand? Be specific about why you do not agree with or understand it.


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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2016, 12:05:05 AM »
What's impossible about either movement?

1. Flat earth models only include rotation around the vertical axis.
2. This image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis.

I am doing my best to explain this in the most simplistic way possible. Which of the above statements do you not agree with or understand? Be specific about why you do not agree with or understand it.

But not all of the sky can be seen at the same time, so depending on where you look the stars can be seen to be traveling vertically into the horizon.
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2016, 02:13:00 AM »
What's impossible about either movement?

1. Flat earth models only include rotation around the vertical axis.
2. This image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis.

I am doing my best to explain this in the most simplistic way possible. Which of the above statements do you not agree with or understand? Be specific about why you do not agree with or understand it.

But not all of the sky can be seen at the same time, so depending on where you look the stars can be seen to be traveling vertically into the horizon.

So you disagree with point number 2?

Let me make sure I understand your point: You are saying that this photo is not demonstrating rotation around a horizontal axis. Only a vertical axis. Is this correct?

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Offline thatsnice

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Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2016, 06:17:24 PM »
1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll)

cough cough, an aileron roll, cough cough
"You never go full retard."

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2016, 06:51:52 PM »
1. The image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis. (Like a plane doing a barrel roll)

cough cough, an aileron roll, cough cough

Indeed. How embarrassing.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2016, 09:43:49 AM »
What's impossible about either movement?

1. Flat earth models only include rotation around the vertical axis.
2. This image demonstrates rotation around a horizontal axis.

I am doing my best to explain this in the most simplistic way possible. Which of the above statements do you not agree with or understand? Be specific about why you do not agree with or understand it.

But not all of the sky can be seen at the same time, so depending on where you look the stars can be seen to be traveling vertically into the horizon.

So you disagree with point number 2?

Let me make sure I understand your point: You are saying that this photo is not demonstrating rotation around a horizontal axis. Only a vertical axis. Is this correct?

If you look to the West you will see the sun generally set vertically into the horizon once it passes over. The same holds with the stars.
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2016, 12:53:46 PM »
If you look to the West you will see the sun generally set vertically into the horizon once it passes over. The same holds with the stars.

This is facing South. You can see the star Antares and the Scorpius constellation. I will elaborate further when I get a chance later.

Re: "Stabilising to the Milky Way shows the rotation of the earth" (gifv)
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2016, 06:45:24 PM »
Elaboration, as promised.

So you disagree with point number 2?

Let me make sure I understand your point: You are saying that this photo is not demonstrating rotation around a horizontal axis. Only a vertical axis. Is this correct?

If you look to the West you will see the sun generally set vertically into the horizon once it passes over. The same holds with the stars.

First of all, you didn't answer my question. It was a yes or no question.

To address your point: yes, if you look West, you will indeed see the sun setting roughly vertically into the horizon. As proven in a number of different threads, this is excellent evidence that the earth is not flat. But this is beside the point, so I won't belabor the point.

As stated, this picture is facing SOUTH.

1. In the flat earth model, the stars are rotating around a vertical axis centered at the North Pole (do you agree?). As a result:
2. In this model, when looking south, the stars are moving perpendicular to your line of vision. They should not be getting significantly further away or closer to you. They should not be moving vertically. They should be moving horizontally across the horizon from east to west.

This is not what happens in the gif. In the gif, the stars follow a small circular path centered around a point due south, somewhere slightly below the horizon. Imagine a pole sticking out from the camera towards the horizon, angled slightly downwards. Everything in the gif appears to rotate around this horizontal pole.

Now do you understand why this gif contradicts the flat earth model?
« Last Edit: June 05, 2016, 06:47:43 PM by TotesNotReptilian »