MrAtlas

Rotations of the stars?
« on: January 13, 2016, 06:07:17 AM »

Why does the stars in the night sky in the North hemisphere rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris, while stars in the South hemisphere rotate clockwise? Shouldn’t the stars rotate in the same direction no matter were you are on the flat Earth?

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Offline Pongo

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2016, 03:51:10 PM »
Celestial gears are what's generally attributed to the explanation.  Ask Thork, it's his specialty.

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2016, 05:29:38 PM »
Why does the stars in the night sky in the North hemisphere rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris, while stars in the South hemisphere rotate clockwise?
Easy:  There is a curved mirror up there. 

Shouldn’t the stars rotate in the same direction no matter were you are on the flat Earth?
--- not if there is more than 1 reflective surface. 
watch?v=xhcVJcINzn8

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Offline Rayzor

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2016, 01:58:03 AM »

Why does the stars in the night sky in the North hemisphere rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris, while stars in the South hemisphere rotate clockwise? Shouldn’t the stars rotate in the same direction no matter were you are on the flat Earth?

Imagine you are standing (near the equator middle on a mountain in Equador ) on a flat earth with the celestial sphere above,  and this celestial sphere with the fixed stars is rotating  if you look towards the north you will observe the stars rotating anticlockwise,  now turn around and look south,  you will observe the stars rotating clockwise. 

Of course this is mechanically equivalent to the stars being a long way away and the earth rotating,   and you'll  need to create lots of extra rotating spheres for planets and comets.   Look up Ptolemy for more details.

I'm in favour of the Copernican version.   It's equivalent and simpler.     

By the way,  I'm not a flat earther.   The earth is actually somewhat spherical.

« Last Edit: January 14, 2016, 04:09:11 AM by Rayzor »

MrAtlas

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2016, 04:15:34 AM »

'Celestial gear' or 'curved mirror'. How do we know and how do we know?

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2016, 03:02:28 PM »
We don't know whether it's a curved mirror; that is merely a theory. However, a spinning globe causing the same phenomenon is also theoretical.

If the earth is indeed flat, then it is logical to assume that the sky might be an elaborate projection, displaying differing pictures around the world, depending on where one is viewing. This is no different than how man-made planetariums work.

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2016, 06:42:44 AM »
We don't know whether it's a curved mirror; that is merely a theory. However, a spinning globe causing the same phenomenon is also theoretical.

If the earth is indeed flat, then it is logical to assume that the sky might be an elaborate projection, displaying differing pictures around the world, depending on where one is viewing. This is no different than how man-made planetariums work.
Except the scale of it. Let's assume this crazy is true  how do you propose they could project on this scale, technically?

Ignored by Intikam since 2016.

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2016, 03:43:43 PM »
Why does the stars in the night sky in the North hemisphere rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris, while stars in the South hemisphere rotate clockwise?
Easy:  There is a curved mirror up there. 

Shouldn’t the stars rotate in the same direction no matter were you are on the flat Earth?
--- not if there is more than 1 reflective surface.
xD omg you guys are willing to say things that make no sense just to back up a claim. Your telling me there is a giant mirror up there? What about our ancient ancestors who claimed they saw the same thing?

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2016, 02:15:06 AM »
Your telling me there is a giant mirror up there?
It sure looks that way to me. 


What about our ancient ancestors who claimed they saw the same thing?
You tell us.  What about them? 
watch?v=xhcVJcINzn8

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2016, 11:39:45 PM »
Why does the stars in the night sky in the North hemisphere rotate counter-clockwise around Polaris, while stars in the South hemisphere rotate clockwise?
Easy:  There is a curved mirror up there. 

Shouldn’t the stars rotate in the same direction no matter were you are on the flat Earth?
--- not if there is more than 1 reflective surface.

But the stars around the southern hemisphere are different. The souther  sky isn't a mirror image of the Northern sky.  There are completely different constellations etc.

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2016, 11:46:42 PM »
Hmm maybe the sky just one huge planetarium  ???

Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2016, 01:12:26 AM »
We don't know whether it's a curved mirror; that is merely a theory. However, a spinning globe causing the same phenomenon is also theoretical.

If the earth is indeed flat, then it is logical to assume that the sky might be an elaborate projection, displaying differing pictures around the world, depending on where one is viewing. This is no different than how man-made planetariums work.

It seems kinda strange to me that God would construct such an elaborate mechanism in the sky when he could have just made the Earth a giant ball orbiting the Sun and it spin it once every 24 hrs to get the exact same effect.

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Offline Munky

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2016, 02:13:21 AM »
It's really simple. Because the earth is a globe and not flat. If the earth were flat as in the flat earth model the stars would spin in the same direction. You would also be able to see Polaris in the Southern Hemisphere. Which you cannot btw.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2016, 12:16:00 AM »
It's really simple. Because the earth is a globe and not flat. If the earth were flat as in the flat earth model the stars would spin in the same direction. You would also be able to see Polaris in the Southern Hemisphere. Which you cannot btw.

I have seen this topic under other guises in "the other place".  One such reduced to a "slanging match" of a FE supporter arguing that the South Celestial Pole could NOT be seen from each of Australia, South Africa and South America.  It ended by showing that on one particular night the SCP can be seen from all those continents at the same time.  Most of the time one or more is in daylight.

In the end FE supporters simply stop responding! 
So many threads simply die because FE supporters will not tackle hard (for them) problems.
I am embarrassed to note how many have my monica! Probably my posts simply bore everybody so much that they fall asleep.

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Offline Munky

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2016, 05:02:29 AM »
oh I am not bored. I like hearing the argument of both sides. Everything I know refutes the Flat earth. Others know less or what they do know does not make sense to them in their own thought. It hasn't yet clicked I suppose. In time I suppose it will for them... I hope...

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2016, 05:26:21 AM »
Lookup the bi-polar model.
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

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Offline Munky

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2016, 05:47:31 AM »
no need to.. The only Bi polar model that works that supports the rotation of the starts is the Globe Earth model.


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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2016, 06:00:39 AM »
Lookup the bi-polar model.
You are joking? 
The Flat Earth Society can't figure out its own model so we have to decide which to use depending on the occasion.

You did mean the one referred to here as the correct FET solar data?
The other "opinions" were posted on youtube by well-intentioned users, who have never had to test their hypotheses in real time debates, as I have done. The data in the official faq has been proven to be wrong in regard to the sun's diameter, shape and orbiting altitude.
Here is the correct FET solar data:
http://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=4429.msg86732#msg86732
Once a person purports to have the truth that no-one else knows my anti BS feelers go up!  But, let's carry on.
I have never seen any serious discussion on that!  Do you really want to get into that can of worms!
My immediate difficulties are:
No Equator, Tropics, Arctic or Antarctic Circle and no lat-long lines shown.
A very complicated (dual) sun path.
No explanation of what stars or planets we might see.

While or that "map", however would:
a plane fly from Singapore to the USA?
a plane fly non-stop from Sydney to Santiago, etc, etc.

I don't really expect anyone to have any ideas about answers to these except Sandokhan.
Quote
What does the Earth look like?
The radius of the flat earth measures 6356.21 km.
This is the correct flat earth map:

Though I guess it's one way of attempting to derail a post!
Now, just what flat earth model should we be looking at?

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Offline Munky

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2016, 06:05:31 AM »
I suppose they want this model.



problem with this model is that if you are in any point of Antartica you should never have a 24 hour sun. Which we know is not true.

Also according to this, if you stand at the north pole you should always have 24 hour sun. I am assuming that the sun does not change its orbit in the sky or dome or whatever is up there... correct?

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Offline Munky

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Re: Rotations of the stars?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2016, 06:08:39 AM »
oh, and how do solar and lunar eclipses work in this model?  ::)