Saddam Hussein

The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« on: December 31, 2014, 05:38:27 PM »
Led Zeppelin was not the band that got me "into" music, but they're still great.  And I'm sure I've already listened to virtually all of their music, but just to refresh myself, I'm going to do a complete listen-through of their material, in chronological order, and post a short review of each thing here.

"Chronological" means chronological.  Don't be stupid.  I won't bother including any compilations, and certainly not Relics.  Nor will I cover the recently remastered albums.

I plan to finish with their headlining performance at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert, as chronicled by the live album/concert film Celebration Day, their final performance together to date, and almost certainly ever.

Also, Snupes ripped off my idea of ripping Parsifal off.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2015, 04:54:24 AM by Saddam Hussein »

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Offline Parsifal

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2014, 06:06:49 PM »
I plan to finish with their headlining performance at the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert, as chronicled by the live album/concert film Celebration Day, their final performance together to date, and almost certainly ever.

No, their final performance ever was on 27 June 1980.
when you try to mock anyone while also running the flat earth society. Lol

Saddam Hussein

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2015, 05:14:24 AM »
Led Zeppelin
Studio album


Recorded: September–October 1968
Released: 12 January 1969

Band lineup

Jimmy Page – acoustic, electric and pedal steel guitars, backing vocals, production
Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica
John Bonham – drums, timpani, backing vocals
John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ, backing vocals

Side one

1.   "Good Times Bad Times"     John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page   2:46
2.   "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You"     Anne Bredon, Traditional arr., Jimmy Page, Robert Plant    6:42
3.   "You Shook Me"     Willie Dixon, J. B. Lenoir   6:28
4.   "Dazed and Confused"     Jimmy Page (inspired by Jake Holmes)   6:28

Side two

5.   "Your Time Is Gonna Come"     Jones, Page   4:34
6.   "Black Mountain Side"     Page        2:12
7.   "Communication Breakdown"     Bonham, Jones, Page   2:30
8.   "I Can't Quit You Baby"     Dixon   4:42
9.   "How Many More Times"     Bonham, Jones, Page   8:27

I feel like there isn't a whole lot to say about this debut because of how raw and stripped-down these songs are, especially in comparison to later albums, but I'll try anyway.  "Good Times, Bad Times" is a great first song, with heavy chords and surprisingly upbeat vocals, given that lyrically, it was the first of many Zeppelin songs to essentially be a rant about a cheating woman.  The song ends on a somewhat creepy note, when the narrator reaffirms his love for the woman and warns her that they will never be separated.

"Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" and "Dazed and Confused" were both originally credited to Jimmy Page.  This was the first of another recurring element of Zeppelin songs - ripping off other people's music and not crediting them.  In both cases, the uncredited songwriters objected, and their influences were eventually acknowledged, although Holmes just seems to have gotten some lip service in the form of the "inspired" credit.  I don't think that's quite fair.  But I'm not here to judge Zeppelin's ethics, only their music, and in both cases their versions of the songs are much better than the originals, with more fleshed-out, heavier instrumentation and echoey vocals from Plant.

I'm not the biggest fan of "You Shook Me."  It's too long for a song in which so little is happening - mainly some simplistic lyrics and a repeated guitar riff - and besides that, it feels a little...excessive in its bluesiness.  It's like the band members were going down a checklist of all the blues clichés and making sure to include them all.  It's the kind of song that Weird Al made fun of with "Generic Blues," because that's what it basically is, generic blues.  The best part is the last minute or so, where Page and Plant try to perform in tandem in a sort of call-and-response format.

Then there's the other side.  "Your Time Is Gonna Come" has a very nice melody led by Jones's organ and a cheery, anthemic chorus.  It's too bad the lyrics are another bitter evil-woman diatribe, as they kind of spoil the mood.  It crossfades into "Black Mountain Side," a folksy instrumental with Page on guitar and Indian musician Viram Jasani on tabla.  It's short but effective.  And then "Communication Breakdown" happens, and it's a pretty jarring shift in tone to suddenly hear that furious riff and Plant's deranged, howling vocals.  It's the closest to punk rock the band ever got, or protopunk, as Wikipedia would put it.  In any case, it's an awesome song.

"I Can't Quit You Baby" is another Willie Dixon cover, and as with the other one, this feels too self-indulgent in bluesy tradition.  There were some bands around that time that could handle this kind of cheesy, winking-at-the-audience blues full of slow guitar riffs and harmonica solos, like the Bluesbreakers and Fleetwood Mac, but it just wasn't Zeppelin's strength.  Still, I prefer this one to "You Shook Me," as Page takes the time to demonstrate what a talented guitarist he is and shows off considerably throughout the song.  Finally, there's "How Many More Times," the longest song on the album.  It's not fantastic, but it's a fun enough listen, especially with its bouncy, swing-like melody.

There we have it, Led Zeppelin's first album.  It's not my favorite one, but it's a solid debut that put the band firmly on the track to stardom, and it's easy to see why.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2015, 07:51:54 PM by Saddam Hussein »

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Offline beardo

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2015, 05:28:02 AM »
tl;dr
The Mastery.

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Offline Fortuna

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2015, 02:45:46 AM »
They're better than Pink Floyd for sure, but Rush still trumps them.
I stopped going to the gym because of Trump. Now I can't open jars

Saddam Hussein

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2015, 09:33:18 PM »
Led Zeppelin II
Studio album


Recorded: January–August 1969
Released: 22 October 1969

Band lineup

John Bonham – drums, timpani
John Paul Jones – bass guitar, organ on "Thank You"
Jimmy Page – electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals, theremin on "Whole Lotta Love"
Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica on "Bring It On Home"

Side one

1.   "Whole Lotta Love"     John Bonham/Willie Dixon/John Paul Jones/Jimmy Page/Robert Plant   5:34
2.   "What Is and What Should Never Be"     Page/Plant   4:46
3.   "The Lemon Song"     Bonham/Chester Burnett/Jones/Page/Plant   6:19
4.   "Thank You"     Page/Plant   4:49

Side two

5.   "Heartbreaker"     Bonham/Jones/Page/Plant   4:14
6.   "Living Loving Maid (She's Just a Woman)"     Page/Plant   2:39
7.   "Ramble On"     Page/Plant   4:34
8.   "Moby Dick"     Bonham/Jones/Page   4:20
9.   "Bring It On Home"     Dixon   4:19

Less than a year after their debut, the Zeppers gave us another album.  It was here that their songwriting became much more structured and focused, leading to an album that I'd argue was actually even better than their first.

"Whole Lotta Love" opens the album, and what an opener it is.  It features a fantastic blues riff, but unlike the riffs on the Dixon covers on the debut, which I disliked, it's much more fast-paced and aggressive, which suited Page's style far more than the slow, languid ones.  Speaking of Dixon, the lyrics are ripped off from a song that he wrote for Muddy Waters, "You Need Love," although the line "I'm gonna give you every inch of my love," was Plant's creation.  Classy.  Anyway, it's a great, hard-pounding song, although the obvious sexual theme might seem overly unsubtle to some people.

Next up is "What Is and What Should Never Be," and...all right, I've danced around the issue long enough.  Something every Zeppelin fan needs to accept is that Robert Plant is, quite simply, a god-awful lyricist.  Not the worst, certainly.  He at least has a decent sense of meter - which is to say that he isn't constantly tripping over excessively long, clunky lyrics full of idiosyncratic uses of overly-technical terms that seem to have been written with the intention of showing off how smart the lyricist thinks he is rather than whether or not they can be sung well (Guess which lyricist that barb was directed at.  Go on, guess.)  But still, they're pretty bad, and nowhere does it show more prominently than songs that are apparently trying to be poetic, mystical, fantasy-influenced, or the like.  "What Is and What Should Never Be" is one of those songs.  It's meant to be a love song, and it has a nice melody, alternating smoothly between soft verses and a heavy chorus, but man, the lyrics suck, and it's really distracting.

"The Lemon Song" is another blues re-working, this time of Howlin' Wolf's "Killing Floor."  Page's enthusiastic lead guitar and Plant's ferocious vocals elevate what on paper would have simply been another blues cover into a great song.  The titular lemon appears to be a metaphor of some sort.  Plant sings about squeezing it until the juice runs down his leg.  Delightful.

"Thank You" is something of an oddity for this album, a sentimental love song that Plant wrote for his wife.  Despite its placement on the heaviest of all Zeppelin albums, I really like this song.  It's a genuinely touching ballad with a beautiful melody, largely due to a fine performance by Jones on keyboard.  And I know I just trashed Plant's lyrics, but here, they're actually quite nice.

On the other side, we get "Heartbreaker," a song that couldn't possibly be more of an abrupt change in tone.  The riff is probably my favorite of theirs - it's heavy, menacing, and yet it's incredibly catchy.  The lyrics are a bitter evil-woman rant, but what else would they be, for a song this harsh?  Add in a guitar solo that, by happy accident, came out as completely isolated from the rest of the instrumentation, and you have one of Zep's best songs.  It segues quickly into "Living Loving Maid (She's Just a Woman)," a short song with a fun, catchy melody, and probably the most unpleasantly sexist lyrics they ever wrote to match it.

This is followed by "Ramble On" a pleasant folk-rock song with acoustic guitar and soft, resonant percussion.  Unfortunately, it also has awful LotR-inspired lyrics.  The first two verses aren't too bad, but the third one starts talking about Mordor and Gollum and crap like that.  I can't listen to it without wincing.  It's still a fantastic song, though.

There aren't many extended drum solos in rock, or at least not in studio recordings, and there's a reason for that.  Drums usually don't sound very good on their own.  It takes a drummer of very rare talent and creativity to come up with a solo that can keep a listener's interest all throughout it.  Fortunately for us, John Bonham was one such drummer, and he shines with a solo of his own making up the bulk of the instrumental "Moby Dick."  I shouldn't discount the great blues riff that Page and Jones give us to introduce and close out the song, either, although it's rather outshadowed by Bonham's drumming.

The album closes with "Bring It On Home," another lift from a Dixon-written song, albeit one performed by Sonny Boy Williamson II.  I don't care too much for this one, sadly.  It's far too restrained at the start and the end, sounding almost note for note like the Williamson song.  There's a middle section that's much more upbeat and boisterous, thankfully, which elevates this song from being crap to simply being mediocre.  That's mediocre by Zep standards, of course.

To conclude, this album is wonderful, the last song and a few problematic lyrics aside.  Like I said, I think it's better than their debut, and it's required listening for any fan of hard rock or heavy metal.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2015, 04:36:36 AM by Saddam Hussein »

Saddam Hussein

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2015, 04:59:38 AM »
Led Zeppelin III
Studio album


Recorded: January–August 1970
Released: 5 October 1970

Band lineup

John Bonham – drums, percussion, backing vocals
John Paul Jones – bass guitar, Hammond organ, moog synthesiser, mandolin, double bass in "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp", string arrangement
Jimmy Page – acoustic, electric and pedal steel guitars, banjo, dulcimer, production, bass guitar on "That's the Way", backing vocals
Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica

Side one

1.   "Immigrant Song"     Jimmy Page, Robert Plant   2:26
2.   "Friends"     Page, Plant   3:55
3.   "Celebration Day"     John Paul Jones, Page, Plant   3:29
4.   "Since I've Been Loving You"     Jones, Page, Plant   7:25
5.   "Out On the Tiles"     John Bonham, Page, Plant   4:04

Side two

6.   "Gallows Pole"     Traditional, arr. Page, Plant   4:58
7.   "Tangerine"     Page   3:12
8.   "That's the Way"     Page, Plant   5:38
9.   "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp"     Jones, Page, Plant   4:20
10.   "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper"     Traditional, arr. Charles Obscure   3:41

After two heavy, boisterous albums, Zeppelin surprised the public with this, a departure from their bluesy roots in favor of folk-influenced music and a softer, more mellow sound in general.  It proved to be polarizing to fans and garnered a mixed critical reception at the time, with some people saying that the band was no longer playing to their strengths, and others arguing that they were making the necessary innovations to ensure their sound didn't grow stale.  Who was right?  Let's find out.

The album opens with "Immigrant Song," a song that punches you in the face immediately with a distinctive galloping riff from Page and Plant's iconic battle cry.  The lyrics talk about a Viking invasion, and I have to say that this band sells the Viking sound better than any other band I've ever heard.  Certainly far better than those Viking metal bands beerdo plugs, anyway.  Anyway, this song kicks ass.

"Friends" is Zep's most psychedelic song since "Dazed and Confused," but goes for a folksy, acoustic sound incorporating strings rather than heavy instrumentation.  Interesting idea for a song, but it doesn't leave much of an impression on me.  "Celebration Day" is a little better, and is notable for being their first foray into funk rock, a genre that they would prove to be quite good at in the future.

"Since I've Been Loving You" is all right, but it's a little too slow for my liking, and overly-long besides, although Page does some impressive guitar work in it.  Then the first side closes out with the last purely-hard rock song of the album, "Out On the Tiles," a fun song with a lively riff.  Not great, but enjoyable all the same.

The other side is much more folksy.  "Gallows Pole" is my favorite track of the album, a sinister reworking of what was already a pretty dark traditional song, in which an man (traditionally a woman, but the band decided to change that for their version) awaiting his execution pleads with his friends and family to bribe the hangman any way they can so he can be set free.  Plant is the one who shines here as he convincingly voices both the desperate prisoner and the sadistic hangman.

"Tangerine," written by Page back when he was with the Yardbirds, is another slow folk rock song, with lyrics that lament a former love.  For what it is, a lightweight ballad, it's fine.  It's followed by a similar song "That's the Way."  Again, it's not bad, per se, and it's nice to hear the experimentation the band was doing with mandolins and dulcimers and the like, but it feels meandering and unfocused.  Making these kinds of acoustic easy-listening songs wasn't Zep's strength.

Speaking of meandering and unfocused, the final two songs are "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" and "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper" (the latter was written by Page, "Charles Obscure" being a pseudonym simply thrown in as a joke).  I don't know what to make of these two.  They're really more country than folk, and they don't seem to be as tightly and carefully crafted as the band's songs usually were.  I suppose if you like country, you might like these last two tracks, but personally, I don't get it.

And that's Led Zeppelin III.  Surprise, I think it's pretty weak.  The only two tracks on it that really qualify as great songs are "Immigrant Song" and "Gallows Pole."  The rest of the album is entirely skippable, unless you're really into the Crosby, Stills and Nash sound, or if you want to hear all of Zep's songs for completion's sake.  Still, this album does represent a couple of important stages in the band's history, namely, a significant reduction of unoriginal/plagiarized material, and an evolving sound that moved away from pure blues rock.  Both of these trends would shape the (significantly better) albums that followed this one, and so even though I don't like this album's sound, I do respect it.

(Also, the jeer about lyricists producing clunky lines that are difficult to sing well was aimed at Neil Peart of Rush.  He is literally the worst lyricist in the history of rock music.  Worse than Plant, worse than Geezer Butler, even worse than David Gilmour and Polly Sampson.)

Saddam Hussein

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2015, 03:54:58 AM »
Led Zeppelin IV
Studio album


Recorded: November 1970 – May 1971
Released: 8 November 1971

Band lineup

John Bonham – drums
John Paul Jones – bass guitar, electric piano, mellotron, mandolin on "Going to California", recorders, EMS VCS 3, acoustic guitar on "The Battle of Evermore"
Jimmy Page – electric and acoustic guitars, mandolin on "The Battle of Evermore", production, mastering, digital remastering
Robert Plant – lead and overdubbed backing vocals, tambourine, harmonica on "When the Levee Breaks"

Side one
   
1.   "Black Dog"     John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant   4:54
2.   "Rock and Roll"     John Bonham, Jones, Page, Plant   3:40
3.   "The Battle of Evermore"     Page, Plant   5:51
4.   "Stairway to Heaven"     Page, Plant   8:01

Side two   
   
5.   "Misty Mountain Hop"     Jones, Page, Plant   4:38
6.   "Four Sticks"     Page, Plant   4:44
7.   "Going to California"     Page, Plant   3:31
8.   "When the Levee Breaks"     Bonham, Jones, Memphis Minnie, Page, Plant   7:07

Technically, this album is untitled.  Evidently, the band was so butthurt from the mediocre reviews of their last album that they decided not only to give the album no name, but also to keep their name off the album entirely. There are just a few odd symbols that are meant to "represent" them on the inner sleeve.  Anyway, let's get to it.

The album is opened with "Black Dog," their loudest, most boisterous, and hardest rocking song of all time.  It's also one of their most awesome.  On the surface, the song is pretty simple in its structure - a call-and-response in which Plant yells a silly line about women a capella, and then the other members play the lengthy riff.  But as the track goes on, some odd experimentation in changing time signatures becomes more and more apparent.  It's a strangely sophisticated twist for what, on the face of it, would usually be considered a pretty stupid song.  Also, this was memorably sampled in Weird Al's "Trapped in the Drive-Thru."

"Rock and Roll" is basically a throwback to fifties-style, well, rock and roll, with a twelve-bar blues chord progression reminiscent of the genre.  I don't have much else to say about it beyond the fact that it's a great song.  It couldn't be more different than the track that follows it, "The Battle of Evermore," a folk song with very little rock influence and co-lead vocals from another singer, Sandy Denny.  The lyrics seem to be a fantastical description of a battle based on Tolkien mythology, and are probably among the geekiest ever committed to paper.  It's a decent song, though.

Skipping over "Stairway to Heaven" for the time being, "Misty Mountain Hop" is surprisingly neither folk nor inspired by Tolkien, but instead a hard rock song that tells the story of a bunch of hippies getting arrested for drug use.  It has one of Zeppelin's most memorable riffs, a few short repeating notes on bass that Plant harmonizes with when singing the verses, giving the song a very unique feel.  And then there's "Four Sticks," which is a fairly straightforward song with a bluesy riff reminiscent of "Moby Dick," and a title inspired by Bonham's decision to use four drumsticks rather than two.

If "Black Dog" is Zeppelin's heaviest song, then "Going to California," a gentle, acoustic folk song, is their softest.  The lyrics are pretty silly, being a sappy tribute to hippie flower-power music, to the degree that even Plant has admitted that he's embarrassed by them.  Despite that, it's hard to really dislike this song.  It's so harmless and innocent that making fun of it just feels wrong, like you're kicking a puppy or something.  The band was clearly trying to be sentimental and show off their lighter side, and for better or worse, they were successful.

The album concludes with the darkest song in their discography, "When the Levee Breaks."  It begins with a brutal drum beat from Bonham, and if it sounds familiar to you, there's a reason why.  It's one of the most famous drum beats in musical history, and it's been sampled by everyone from the Beastie Boys to Björk.  It's the perfect way to establish the mood of the song, which is quite clearly something along the lines of "Oh, shit!"  Ominous guitar chords, echoey harmonica solos, and Plant's howling vocals are wrapped together with immaculate production to form a showcase of truly apocalyptic blues.  It's a downer of an ending, but a magnificent downer.

And now, let's take a look at "Stairway to Heaven," easily Zeppelin's most famous song, and frequently called one of the greatest songs of all time.  First things first - that lawsuit from that prog rock band Spirit is complete fucking bullshit.  I don't mean that in a Parsifal-esque "copyright doesn't real" way, but that they simply don't have a case, given current law.  The chord progression in the intro sounds like the one in Spirit's song for a few seconds, big fucking deal.  Maybe if the melody itself had been lifted, they'd have a valid claim, but with just a couple of seconds of alike notes, no.  That's crap.  These nobodies are just looking for a handout, and I'm glad to see that Zep isn't going to give it to them.

Back to the review.  "Stairway" is split up into three sections, the first being a folksy tune with acoustic guitar and gentle singing, the second where drums and electric instrumentation kick in, and the third being straight-up hard rock.  It's that final part that lends this song its true magnificence, I've always felt.  The first two sections are good, don't get me wrong, but the final two and a half minutes are among the finest ever recorded in the history of rock music, and Page's guitar solo here is the greatest guitar solo of all time.  I know that's a bold claim to make, but I'm sticking to it.  It's so soaring and majestic that nothing can beat it.  And if by some strange chance you haven't heard "Stairway" before, stop reading this review right now and go listen to it.  Even if you don't like it (in which case you should be shot), you still need to have heard it at least once.  The song is simply part of our cultural consciousness.

Thus concludes the review of Zeppelin's untitled fourth album.  It's probably not my personal favorite, but from a more historical standpoint, it's hard to argue that this was their greatest album.  It just has so many of their classic songs on it, and shows off exactly what they were best at.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2015, 09:40:38 PM by Saddam Hussein »

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Offline Parsifal

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2015, 10:58:48 PM »
when you try to mock anyone while also running the flat earth society. Lol

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Offline Roundy

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2015, 03:12:03 AM »
Led Zeppelin IV

Sorry, what?

Technically, this album is untitled.

Maybe you missed?

I know you're just Parsifaling but this is the name used most often by fans to refer to this album, whether it's accurate or not.
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Offline Roundy

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2015, 03:16:55 AM »
Next up is "What Is and What Should Never Be," and...all right, I've danced around the issue long enough.  Something every Zeppelin fan needs to accept is that Robert Plant is, quite simply, a god-awful lyricist.  Not the worst, certainly.  He at least has a decent sense of meter - which is to say that he isn't constantly tripping over excessively long, clunky lyrics full of idiosyncratic uses of overly-technical terms that seem to have been written with the intention of showing off how smart the lyricist thinks he is rather than whether or not they can be sung well (Guess which lyricist that barb was directed at.  Go on, guess.)  But still, they're pretty bad, and nowhere does it show more prominently than songs that are apparently trying to be poetic, mystical, fantasy-influenced, or the like.  "What Is and What Should Never Be" is one of those songs.  It's meant to be a love song, and it has a nice melody, alternating smoothly between soft verses and a heavy chorus, but man, the lyrics suck, and it's really distracting.

Ecch, one of my favorite Zeppelin songs.  Say what you will about the lyrics but that bassline can't be denied.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2015, 03:20:50 AM by Roundy »
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Saddam Hussein

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2015, 03:34:36 AM »
We had a very dumb discussion on IRC where he insisted that the real title of the album was the four symbols.  Not even the most indie alt-rock band in the world would be so hipster as to name an album something like that.  And I can respect your opinion of "What Is and What Should Never Be."  The instrumentation is certainly excellent, even if the lyrics aren't.

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Offline Particle Person

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2015, 03:42:16 AM »
He's parsitarded. The band themselves said that the album has no official title.
Your mom is when your mom and you arent your mom.

Ghost of V

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2015, 03:54:47 AM »
He's parsitarded. The band themselves said that the album has no official title.

So the official title is Untitled.

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Offline Particle Person

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2015, 03:55:27 AM »
Yeah, and atheism is a religion.
Your mom is when your mom and you arent your mom.

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Offline Hoppy

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2015, 01:48:21 PM »
Yeah, and atheism is a religion.
Particle'd
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Ghost of V

Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2015, 10:48:57 PM »
Yeah, and atheism is a religion.

I could trust you, or I could trust google


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Offline Rama Set

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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2015, 11:14:27 PM »
Yeah, and atheism is a religion.

I could trust you, or I could trust google



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Re: The Led Zeppelin discography listen-through
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2015, 11:40:31 PM »
No, the official title is not Untitled. If that were the case, the album would have an official title.
Your mom is when your mom and you arent your mom.