Offline Action80

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Cheating in Chess
« on: November 27, 2023, 07:36:13 PM »
Cheating in chess has garnered much attention over the past year, commencing with the former World Champion (2013-2023), GM Magnus Carlsen, withdrawing from the 2022 Sinquefeld Cup after losing to GM Hans Niemann in their third-round match of the event. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlsen%E2%80%93Niemann_controversy

Since that event last year, much of the news involving cheating in chess has been centered on steps that major online platforms, such as Chess.com and Lichess, have taken in an effort to detect cheating on their websites.

Most recently, GM Hikaru Nakamura, who is the second-highest-rated blitz player on the Chess.com platform, has been effectively accused of cheating on the platform by former World Champion (2000-2007), GM Vladimir Kramnik. Kramnik has started a petition demanding Chess.com perform and publish an analysis of the results Nakamura has achieved over a recent sixty-day period of play on Chess.com.
Petiton]https://tinyurl.com/yznvyxhw]Petiton

When the Carlsen-Niemann controversy erupted, I was questioning the governance policy/procedure FIDE (the governing body of professional chess worldwide) had in place concerning inviting or allowing admitted or proven cheaters to participate in FIDE-sanctioned tournaments, even those held in person and over-the-board. I do not believe persons found to have cheated during online chess should be invited or allowed to participate in FIDE-sanctioned tournaments.

This latest bit of news involving Nakamura becomes even more interesting given that Nakamura has qualified to participate in the next Candidates tournament.   
« Last Edit: November 27, 2023, 07:47:45 PM by Action80 »
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.