Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« on: March 30, 2021, 06:23:54 PM »
So I've found this site which accurately predicts the position of satellites passing overhead. I went outside last night and sure enough it works.

This tool is clearly using a round earth model to predict the positions of the ISS, star link satellites, etc. And it gets everything right, right down to the satellite positions relative to the trees in my front yard.

My question is how can they make predicts like this if they started with an inaccurate globe model?

https://james.darpinian.com/satellites/

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2021, 03:21:07 AM »
RE is not required to predict celestial motion. The Ancient Babylonians did it and they believed that the earth was flat, and had no geometrical scheme of planetary or lunar motion behind their predictions.

Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2021, 03:41:16 AM »
RE is not required to predict celestial motion. The Ancient Babylonians did it and they believed that the earth was flat, and had no geometrical scheme of planetary or lunar motion behind their predictions.

Sure that's true, but satellites aren't celestial. The Spacex satellites are particularly interesting because they form constellations and are clearly man-made.

If you go outside at the time listed for your location you can see a long strings of many satellites flying through the sky, and unlike airplanes they are completely silent.

How is it possible that 10 objects could be visibly flying through the sky, in a straight line, and make no noise? And not only that some armature's website is able to predict their location with pinpoint accuracy.

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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2021, 08:14:27 AM »
RE is not required to predict celestial motion. The Ancient Babylonians did it and they believed that the earth was flat, and had no geometrical scheme of planetary or lunar motion behind their predictions.

Was there any instance of them observing, and predicting the appearance of, a celestial object appearing in the twilight sky, then re-appearing 90 minutes later, showing the same direction and speed of travel?
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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2021, 08:04:04 PM »
RE is not required to predict celestial motion. The Ancient Babylonians did it and they believed that the earth was flat, and had no geometrical scheme of planetary or lunar motion behind their predictions.
Not relevant.  The operation of satellites is proven by the angles calculated to receive their signals.

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Offline Elyn95

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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2021, 06:53:50 PM »
If your claims to accuracy are correct, then it is still entirely possible to predict satellite position with a FE model. The satellites can be circling in the firmament and recieving signals in just the same way that they are with a RE model. I don't see the issue.
The production of too many useless things results in too many useless people.

Offline SteelyBob

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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2021, 07:00:59 PM »
If your claims to accuracy are correct, then it is still entirely possible to predict satellite position with a FE model. The satellites can be circling in the firmament and recieving signals in just the same way that they are with a RE model. I don't see the issue.

What’s holding them up there?

Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2021, 12:21:46 AM »
If your claims to accuracy are correct, then it is still entirely possible to predict satellite position with a FE model. The satellites can be circling in the firmament and recieving signals in just the same way that they are with a RE model. I don't see the issue.

If this is true then it is actually a very exciting discovery for flat earth theory. This website is able to both accurately predict the position of the satellites in the sky AND mark the positions of the satellites on a globe. Assuming the speed of each satellite is constant and their movement within the firmament is circular, we should be able use this information to create an accurate map of the flat earth. With several data points we could calculate a linear transformation that transforms the globe map into a flat earth map. Given the accuracy of the satellite position data it may well be the most accurate map of the flat earth ever created.

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Online Iceman

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Re: Predicting satellite positions with a flat earth model
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2021, 01:14:10 AM »
Dont unmute:


Ripped this from a similar thread in FET board "low earth orbits vs sun and moon"