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Offline TomInAustin

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How High Do You Have To Be To See The Curvature?
« on: September 08, 2020, 08:27:15 PM »

The guy that did this video is very educated about physics.   This video is NOT presented to try and prove flat vs round but is a great explanation of the question.  Its also an entertaining one as it allows you to pan and tilt around.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpUcZXiKtfU
Nothing Guest has ever said should be taken as representative of anything other than Guest's own delusions opinions.

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Offline Toddler Thork

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Re: How High Do You Have To Be To See The Curvature?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2020, 08:30:50 PM »
I'd recommend at least 2 grams of coke. 😵
Flat Earth humour is just on another plane.

Minimum settings 60,000 ft ... but 80,000+ ft recommended.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2020, 09:04:23 PM by Toddler Thork »
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Offline Tumeni

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Re: How High Do You Have To Be To See The Curvature?
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2020, 02:20:56 PM »
Simple geometry could tell us. Taking the Red Bull Space Dive of a few years ago as an example, climb to a certain height above the Earth's surface. Application of spherical geometry and trig, combined with the textbook figures for radius/diameter/circumference of Earth will tell you how far you will be able to see to the horizon, and what landmarks or geographical features you will be able to see within and at that distance.

The type of camera optics used does not enter into the discussion. Fisheye, telephoto - whatever, does not matter.

Apply this to the Red Bull flight, and it yields, at the stated height of the capsule, a visibility splay of approximately this size;



Note that no large body of water is expected to be seen with this splay, and none is seen in the video or photos from the capsule. Compare the video and photos to a map of the area within, and it can be seen that the capsule can "see" only the approximate area shown, and has no visibility beyond. Entirely consistent with a sphere/globe Earth. 
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Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
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Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

Re: How High Do You Have To Be To See The Curvature?
« Reply #3 on: Today at 04:01:22 AM »
Thork beat me to it.

You have to be REALLY, REALLY high.  Like never coming down, never gonna be the same, kind of high.  LSD is the "space age" drug of choice, and one of the only ones strong enough to induce the kind of hallucination you are after.

There is no curvature of the horizon at any attainable height.  This has been confirmed to the nth degree, and you are welcome to confirm it for yourself for around $100 if you want.

The horizon is an optical illusion, the "edge" of nothing but our vision, and we were all egregiously mistaught about it.

Re: How High Do You Have To Be To See The Curvature?
« Reply #4 on: Today at 07:44:04 AM »
There is no curvature of the horizon at any attainable height.  This has been confirmed to the nth degree
So are all the high altitude photos showing curvature fake or distorted?

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The horizon is an optical illusion, the "edge" of nothing but our vision

If that is true why can we see things beyond the horizon but not all of them? Why do things sink below the horizon as they get further away. If it’s the limit of our vision shouldn’t they just vanish?
And why does horizon distance increase with height? Why does the limit of our vision increase when you ascend?
These things make sense in the context of a globe, what is your explanation?
"On a very clear and chilly day it is possible to see Lighthouse Beach from Lovers Point and vice versa...Upon looking into the telescope I can see children running in and out of the water, splashing and playing. I can see people sun bathing at the shore
- An excerpt from the account of the Bishop Experiment. My emphasis