Offline edby

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Re: Are flights from and to French Polynesia a hoax?
« Reply #80 on: July 31, 2020, 10:19:15 AM »
... and, to get back to flight-related stuff, today's flight BAW6B, arrival LHR 13:35 on Friday 31st, is currently over open ocean, South of Greenland.
I shall keep an eye out for it as it comes in.

And to get right back to the OP, are such flights hoaxes? We have the data from FR24. The fact that I can see the planes coming in to LHR from my window, and that I can identify both the airline and the plane type (but not the flight number) suggest that the data is authentic. Further evidence could be obtained from the departure and arrival boards online.

Then there is the secondary question of whether we can infer flight distance from flight time, which requires assumptions about how fast planes fly.

We would then have to look for evidence including wind speed. See e.g. the wiki https://wiki.tfes.org/Issues_in_Flight_Analysis.

One experiment would be to find flights on the same route but travelling in opposite directions. If high wind speeds were causing discrepancies, then the effect should be equal and opposite.

Perhaps the subject for another thread.


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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Are flights from and to French Polynesia a hoax?
« Reply #81 on: July 31, 2020, 10:21:24 AM »
The data needs to go onto some shape. The author is explaining that the NAD84 puts the data onto a plane.

Yes, and it needs to be ABSTRACTED because of the difference between globe and plane. If it were plane to plane, there would be no need for abstraction

If the maps were round one could say that the data is abstracted onto a curved surface. It would mean that the data is put onto a curved surface.

If the "maps were round", i.e. on a scaled-down model globe, then there would be no need for abstraction; they would be reduced in scale, but reduced in proportion, and no abstraction would take place.



It specifically says that the systems work together and the data is re-projected from round earth to flat earth in order to be usable and gather accurate distances and area calculations:

"Web Mercator’s significant weakness is that measurements of distance and area in its native coordinates are completely unusable. Where accurate distance and area calculations are needed, web-mercator GIS data must be temporarily reprojected to a more suitable coordinate system (UTM NAD83)."

In the context of usage of GIS data. Not universally. Not in all other circumstances.
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Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
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Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

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Offline GreatATuin

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Re: Are flights from and to French Polynesia a hoax?
« Reply #82 on: August 01, 2020, 08:02:29 AM »
I have not seen evidence that Web Mercator (Web-based WGS84 used in Google/Bing Maps) is based on a sphere. Various statements suggest otherwise -  https://wiki.tfes.org/World_Geodetic_System_1984

It absolutely is, or if you want to be precise, not exactly a sphere but a reference ellipsoid. Do you take the time to understand what you read? Once again, you quote sources that say verbatim that the Earth is "best modeled as an ellipsoid" and try to make them look like they say something else. I genuinely wonder if this cherrypicking is deliberate and just a form of trolling, or if you're really convinced that you've uncovered a discrepancy in the geodetic model. If it's the former - well, fine. If it's the latter, please take the time to understand what you read.
Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

you guys just read what you want to read