Offline Storm

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flat earth
« on: March 03, 2020, 12:24:00 AM »

The picture you originally posted calls them "night" blooming flowers. As has been explained, they have evolved to bloom at night to coincide with nocturnal insects which pollinate them. Nothing to do with moonlight.

Does this imply that there aren't enough diurnal insects to get the job done?

And, nothing to do with moonlight?

All of these people from the article linked would strongly disagree with you. Seeing that they are the ones who did the extensive research and published their findings:

Isabella Guerrini, at the University of Perugia in Italy
Authors Ian Cole and Michael Balick
Ernst Zurcher
Dr. Guerrini
Article author Guido Mase

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Planting by the moon
While the factors that affect plant growth are complex and vary greatly, the basic concept is really quite simple. As the moon increases in light towards the full moon, sap flow is more active. Conversely, as the moon wanes, sap flow slows.
https://permacultureprinciples.com/post/moonlight-affect-plant-growth/#lightbox/0/


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moonlight is uniquely different than sunlight. (Moonlight is NOT reflected sunlight.)

No it isn't and yes it is....

Oh, yes it is and no, it isn't.

The article in question clearly states:
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...moonlight [is] not just a less intense version of sunlight—it is somewhat qualitatively different, too.

Just to specifically respond to this part:

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What we do know is that moonlight, while generally similar to the sunlight..., shifts a bit towards the infrared...This makes moonlight not just a less intense version of sunlight—it is somewhat qualitatively different, too.

Any body when reflecting light will absorb some wavelengths and reflect others. That is literally how we see colours. There is no inherent "redness" about things we perceive as red, they simply absorb other wavelengths and reflect red ones. So yes, the light coming from the moon will have a different spectrum to that coming from the sun because of the wavelengths which the moon absorbs.

You are simply describing a less intense version of sunlight; exactly what the article specifically points out is 'not' the reason for their results. They are adamant that their findings are due to the light of the moon; not some gravitational effect, nor any less intense version of reflected sunlight.

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...he also points out that the easy explanation (a tide-like gravitational force) is most likely incorrect, as the amount of water in even the largest tree is relatively small, and a tidal force would be negligible.
https://permacultureprinciples.com/post/moonlight-affect-plant-growth/#lightbox/0/
"...because they received not the love of the Truth, that they might be saved. And for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie: That they all might be damned who believed not the Truth..." (2 Thes. 2:10-12) KJV

"To this end was I born, ...that I should bear witness unto the Truth. Every one that is of the Truth heareth my voice." (-Jesus' words-John 18:37) KJV

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Offline stack

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Re: flat earth
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2020, 12:38:37 AM »
You are simply describing a less intense version of sunlight; exactly what the article specifically points out is 'not' the reason for their results. They are adamant that their findings are due to the light of the moon; not some gravitational effect, nor any less intense version of reflected sunlight.

What's the point you are trying to make? I don't think anyone thus far has said anyone has suggested a lunar gravitational effect on night blooming flowers.
Not much is known about the celestial bodies and their distances.

Re: flat earth
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2020, 01:07:41 AM »
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What we do know is that moonlight, while generally similar to the sunlight..., shifts a bit towards the infrared...This makes moonlight not just a less intense version of sunlight—it is somewhat qualitatively different, too.

Quote
Any body when reflecting light will absorb some wavelengths and reflect others. That is literally how we see colours. There is no inherent "redness" about things we perceive as red, they simply absorb other wavelengths and reflect red ones. So yes, the light coming from the moon will have a different spectrum to that coming from the sun because of the wavelengths which the moon absorbs.

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You are simply describing a less intense version of sunlight; exactly what the article specifically points out is 'not' the reason for their results. They are adamant that their findings are due to the light of the moon; not some gravitational effect, nor any less intense version of reflected sunlight.

What AATW is describing is the shift towards the infrared that the authors describe.  The light my red shirt reflects from the sun “shifts to the infrared”.  It is qualitatively different, but is still a reflection. It absorbs most wavelengths and reflects back red.

Also note the quote says moonlight isn’t “just” less intense...implying that it isnt only less intense sunlight but alsoqualitatively different...because it shifts to the infrared.

And gravity does effect plant growth.  It’s called gravitropisim

https://schaechter.asmblog.org/schaechter/2018/04/more-on-how-to-tell-up-and-down.html
« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 01:21:47 AM by pricelesspearl »