One Pole or Two?
« on: June 26, 2019, 01:39:24 PM »
The most common FE model is of the North Pole in the centre of a disc, the continents spread out around it and an ice ring around the outside surrounded by a wall. I believe this ice ring is Antarctica, it is not generally thought of as a continent. This is the model outlined here:

https://wiki.tfes.org/Flat_Earth_-_Frequently_Asked_Questions#What_does_the_earth_look_like.3F_How_is_circumnavigation_possible.3F

The seasons are explained in this model with the sun circling the north pole and the radius of that circle changing throughout the year. In the northern "hemisphere" summer the sun circles closer to the North Pole - that fits with observations of the 24 hour sun circling the pole in the Arctic summer and the northern hemisphere is getting more direct sunlight. In the southern "hemisphere" summer the sun circles further from the north pole, from that distance the north pole can't "see" the sun, hence the perpetual darkness. And the south then gets more of the direct sunlight.

The problems with this are claims of Antarctica having been crossed, there is claimed to be a permanent scientific base at the South Pole and there are videos which claim to show 24 hour sun circling the south pole in the southern summer much the same way as it circles the north pole in the northern summer. The stars in the south are said to rotate around a southern hub and there's claimed to be a sailing race around Antarctica

Given the evidence for a southern continent, an alternative model with two Poles has been suggested and the Wiki references this here:

https://wiki.tfes.org/Bi-Polar_Model

This does resolve the above issues but then creates a problem with the path of the sun - the way it is said to move in the monopole model no longer works.

There is an emphasis in the FE community on empirical evidence and people making their own observations. Given the difficulty of doing this in this area - we can't all explore the pole or poles - how do we arrive at consensus? Some questions which may help discussion:

1) Which model do you favour?
2) How did you arrive at that conclusion?
3) If you favour the monopole model what do you make about the claims about a southern continent and the alleged observations from it?
4) If you favour the bi-polar model, how does the path of the sun change in a way which matches observations?
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

Offline iamcpc

  • *
  • Posts: 575
    • View Profile
Re: One Pole or Two?
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2019, 02:45:27 PM »
1) Which model do you favour?

The model that makes the most sense to me is not listed on the wiki.
Here's what the model that makes the most sense to me looks like:
https://www.bing.com/maps

2) How did you arrive at that conclusion?

The wiki models don't do well with reconciling with modern cartography, travel times, flight times, shipping times, etc.  The https://www.bing.com/maps model does very well with all of those things.

3) If you favour the monopole model what do you make about the claims about a southern continent and the alleged observations from it?
4) If you favour the bi-polar model, how does the path of the sun change in a way which matches observations?

modern cartography, travel times, flight times, shipping times, etc. have provided, what I believe to be, very strong evidence which significantly weakens these models.

Offline ChrisTP

  • *
  • Posts: 354
    • View Profile
Re: One Pole or Two?
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2019, 03:25:06 PM »
Your prefered map is just as distorted as other projections of the globe map. Greenland is not the size of africa in reality.
Tom is wrong most of the time. Hardly big news, don't you think?

Offline iamcpc

  • *
  • Posts: 575
    • View Profile
Re: One Pole or Two?
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2019, 07:53:18 PM »
Your prefered map is just as distorted as other projections of the globe map. Greenland is not the size of africa in reality.

This is incorrect. Did you even look at the map?  If you zoom to Greenland you can see that it has an interactive scale which changes and that Greenland, based on the scale, is smaller than Africa. If you would like i can take screenshots for you.