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Offline Bad Puppy

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Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #60 on: July 03, 2019, 03:58:56 AM »

I know what you are trying to say here, but it still doesn't work without distortion. Take Wyoming for example. In Bing maps, Wyoming is depicted as a perfect rectangle (90 degree angles), no matter what zoom level you're at. But in reality, (looking straight down at it) Wyoming is actually trapezoidal, with an ever-so-slightly curved top and bottom. The northern border is 342 miles wide, while the southern border is 365 miles wide.



Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows wyoming as you describe

Looks trapezoidal to me.  There may be approximately 90 degree angles on the corners, but the north and south aren't straight lines.  They bow outwards and inwards, respectively.  That makes it possible to have a trapezoidal shape and have right angles.
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Offline iamcpc

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Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #61 on: July 03, 2019, 06:21:32 PM »

I know what you are trying to say here, but it still doesn't work without distortion. Take Wyoming for example. In Bing maps, Wyoming is depicted as a perfect rectangle (90 degree angles), no matter what zoom level you're at. But in reality, (looking straight down at it) Wyoming is actually trapezoidal, with an ever-so-slightly curved top and bottom. The northern border is 342 miles wide, while the southern border is 365 miles wide.



Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows wyoming as you describe

Looks trapezoidal to me.  There may be approximately 90 degree angles on the corners, but the north and south aren't straight lines.  They bow outwards and inwards, respectively.  That makes it possible to have a trapezoidal shape and have right angles.


Your claim was that the Wyoming border does not have 90 degree angles. Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows Wyoming as you describe?

I have to ask again because when i asked the first time you didn't reply with a map or glove which shows Wyoming without 90 degree angles.  You replied with your opinion about the angles.


Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #62 on: July 03, 2019, 06:33:14 PM »

I know what you are trying to say here, but it still doesn't work without distortion. Take Wyoming for example. In Bing maps, Wyoming is depicted as a perfect rectangle (90 degree angles), no matter what zoom level you're at. But in reality, (looking straight down at it) Wyoming is actually trapezoidal, with an ever-so-slightly curved top and bottom. The northern border is 342 miles wide, while the southern border is 365 miles wide.



Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows wyoming as you describe

Looks trapezoidal to me.  There may be approximately 90 degree angles on the corners, but the north and south aren't straight lines.  They bow outwards and inwards, respectively.  That makes it possible to have a trapezoidal shape and have right angles.


Your claim was that the Wyoming border does not have 90 degree angles. Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows Wyoming as you describe?

I have to ask again because when i asked the first time you didn't reply with a map or glove which shows Wyoming without 90 degree angles.  You replied with your opinion about the angles.

I think it depends on the browser you use to view Google Maps. I noticed when using the Google Maps app on my iPhone, it is using a Mercator projection. I'm not sure what Android Google Maps uses. But when viewing it in a Chrome browser on a PC, it is on a sphere. So I don't know which projection will be shown in Google Maps in all situations, as I can only test a few.

However, Google EARTH should always use the spherical projection, so that would probably be the best one to use to compare.

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Offline Bad Puppy

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Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #63 on: July 03, 2019, 07:44:51 PM »

I know what you are trying to say here, but it still doesn't work without distortion. Take Wyoming for example. In Bing maps, Wyoming is depicted as a perfect rectangle (90 degree angles), no matter what zoom level you're at. But in reality, (looking straight down at it) Wyoming is actually trapezoidal, with an ever-so-slightly curved top and bottom. The northern border is 342 miles wide, while the southern border is 365 miles wide.



Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows wyoming as you describe

Looks trapezoidal to me.  There may be approximately 90 degree angles on the corners, but the north and south aren't straight lines.  They bow outwards and inwards, respectively.  That makes it possible to have a trapezoidal shape and have right angles.


Your claim was that the Wyoming border does not have 90 degree angles. Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows Wyoming as you describe?

I have to ask again because when i asked the first time you didn't reply with a map or glove which shows Wyoming without 90 degree angles.  You replied with your opinion about the angles.

I don't believe any claim was made that it does not have 90 degree angles.  The claim that Uetzicle made is that it's trapezoidal.  And, not because of the angles, but in this case because of the curves at the north and south.
Quote from: Tom Bishop
...circles do not exist and pi is not 3.14159...

Quote from: totallackey
Do you have any evidence of reality?

Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #64 on: July 05, 2019, 06:28:28 PM »
Hey guys,

first off: Thanks for replying, I'm happy I encouraged a discussion  :)

iamcpc, I totally get what confuses you and I think the Approach used to tell you why the bing Map you provided is distorted was not clear enough for you to see it, so let me try

In my original post (and that what it's all About) I talked About a 2d map, and a 2d map is a map you could print out. So what I Need is a map of the earth on a piece of paper where the lenghts and the angles are Right (in that case it would be undistorted and my Point would be satisfied). So if we do that with the bing map we would have to take the fully zoomed out view, print it out and THEN look if the two Points are true. That's not the case, I could Show you that quite easily if you want me too or you can take my word for it...
If you would however ask me to do that I could Show you what's wrong with the other map you have shown us on one example.
I just got one Question: Where can I get the true lenghts of the countrys? Is the measurement on the bing map correct in your opinion? If yes I can show you the Problem if not please tell me where I can get the Right measurements from.
Thanks!


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Offline stack

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Re: Mapping the Earth
« Reply #65 on: July 07, 2019, 07:17:00 AM »

I know what you are trying to say here, but it still doesn't work without distortion. Take Wyoming for example. In Bing maps, Wyoming is depicted as a perfect rectangle (90 degree angles), no matter what zoom level you're at. But in reality, (looking straight down at it) Wyoming is actually trapezoidal, with an ever-so-slightly curved top and bottom. The northern border is 342 miles wide, while the southern border is 365 miles wide.



Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows wyoming as you describe

Looks trapezoidal to me.  There may be approximately 90 degree angles on the corners, but the north and south aren't straight lines.  They bow outwards and inwards, respectively.  That makes it possible to have a trapezoidal shape and have right angles.


Your claim was that the Wyoming border does not have 90 degree angles. Google maps which represents the earth as a perfect sphere also shows Wyoming with 90 degree angles. Do you have any map or globe that shows Wyoming as you describe?

I have to ask again because when i asked the first time you didn't reply with a map or glove which shows Wyoming without 90 degree angles.  You replied with your opinion about the angles.

90 degrees is sort of a misnomer. Because, again, we're talking about 3D Globe projections onto a 2D plane. The eastern and western borders of Wyoming were plotted to parallel along longitudinal lines, as mentioned previously, the northern border is shorter than the southern border by about 20 miles. Here is what Wyoming looks like on Google maps:



Spherical Geometry and the notion of 90 degrees is an interesting subject, but perhaps not for this thread.
Not much is known about the celestial bodies and their distances.