George

Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2160 on: December 02, 2016, 08:02:39 PM »
They could both have been the Underking at different points in time.

Given who the Underking was - the lich that endured for centuries when Tiber Septim used his soul to charge the Numidium and never gave it back afterwards - I would say that's not really possible.  The Numidium could transcend time, but Septim himself only used it to conquer Cyrodiil once.

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Offline beardo

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Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2161 on: December 02, 2016, 08:04:52 PM »
Omg conflicting accounts! Just like history, myths and legends in real life!
The Mastery.

George

Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2162 on: December 11, 2016, 11:14:37 PM »
Maybe, but in what culture would a myth or legend like this originate?  The obvious guess is the Nords, because of the focus on Wulfharth, but both in terms of style and narrative, this doesn't feel like a traditional story of theirs at all.  There's usually an attempt at high-flown language to give them a sweeping, epic feel, while their heroes are straightforward badasses who basically just kill everyone and win great glory.  It might be from a Shezarr cult in Cyrodiil, which would explain Wulfharth being portrayed as far more subtle and cunning than traditional Nord heroes, but I don't know if they'd be willing to also portray Tiber Septim as a traitorous backstabber.  I wish we had gotten to see cults in Oblivion, or any of the cool shit contrasting the Colovian and Nibenese cultures.  Stupid Bethesda dumbing down their games.

<Crudblud> "King Hrigabrigabog fucked the moon with his nostril hairs. And then my penis was a robot." - Michael Kirkbriderino on how Cyrodiil became a forest
<Saddam> He fucked the moon, meaning he fucked Lorkhan?
<Crudblud> What about the other moon?
<Saddam> Well
<Crudblud> "The other moon was my nipples" - Kinkbird
<Saddam> The Khajiit believe that Lorkhaj's body is represented by a third moon
<Saddam> Which you visit in ESO
<Saddam> By going on an intense drug trip
<Saddam> And yes, the distinction between Lorkhan and Lorkhaj is important
<Crudblud> "Then Lorkhan lactated on my face and King Hrigabrigabog fucked the milk with his eyeballs and the world was covered in sputum and I ate my own cock and then Patrick Stewart said 'That's fucking weird man' and I was like 'Dude I know but check this out' and I took a shit and it dragon broke my asshole" - Corkbitch
<Saddam> 10/10 want moar
<Crudblud> "Then Todd Howard showed up and fired me and proceeded to write alduin is real and he ent akatosh"
<Crudblud> THE END

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Offline beardo

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Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2163 on: December 12, 2016, 01:25:47 PM »
The Mastery.

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Offline beardo

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Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2164 on: December 19, 2016, 01:23:57 PM »


>tfw the ES game with the best story and writing also have the worst gameplay mechanics, controls and hardware optimization, making it borderline unplayable...
The Mastery.

George

Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2165 on: December 23, 2016, 01:28:26 AM »
On the notion of Michael Kirkbride's thoughts on Redguard:

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No, I was actually referring to The Black Panthers and their radicalism.

As some people know I'm not really a fan of the United Colors of Beneton approach to Tamrielicreation, which smacks of white guilt and offensery rather than some holistic form of beautiful inclusion. Thus, it's my fault that the Asian analogues got eaten. Oops. Looks like others are bringing 'em back, though. But I promise my choice had nothing to do with Yellow Peril, it had to do with co-opting "coolness of color" without thinking about it intelligently and compassionately.

(Hunkers down for the flame.)

That said, when I started writing Redguard I really thought about how unique the black people of Tamriel were: they came in and kicked ass and slaughtered the indigenes while doing so. They invaded. It was the first time I had encountered the idea of "black imperialism"...and it struck me big time, as something 1) new, 2) potentially dangerous if taken as commentary, and 3) potentially rad if taken as commentary.

Who knows. AVault did say it had a story worthy of being on stage, and Michael Mack (Cyrus) once thanked me for giving him words that "Black folks don't get to say" (referring to Cyrus' speech and the reversal of Son to the Father)... which broke my heart and made me puff my chest all at the same time.

Which is a long way of saying: panther-love.

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The weirdest thing-- and this is no joke-- I inexplicably pulled out the PGE Thursday night to read it. FOR NO REASON. I got all nostalgic and went, Hmm, the reason Cyrus is so fun is that he actually inhabits this world as the common man with an uncommon profession, i.e. adventuring. He doesn't question the world's weirdness, as that notion would never occur to him. It's just his world and he works with it. And not in the Doctor Who fashion, where of course he works with it, no matter how crazy, because Doctor Who is a Chaotic Fun crazy junkie who actively seeks out such situations (and God bless him for it). Cyrus "just" lives in Tamriel and, while he can get confused, baffled, angry at, or one-upped by its magical nature, he's not adventuring to test those boundaries or, hell, even find them. Where's the money in that?

Yes, Cyrus' level-headedness is a useful cypher, but I was there when he was created, and his character wasn't consciously infused with that literary device in mind. (At least not towards the magical hijinx; he was definitely used that way for the political stuff.) So then I went, Hmm, all future stories told about Cyrus need to be careful not to use him solely for that utility, or risk him becoming a gimmick.

So, of course, the next thought was: "Screw that, what if Cyrus just fought everyone in Tamrielic history?" which completely ran contrary to all my analysis. Cuz it just works like that.

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Offline honk

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Re: The Elder Scrolls Online/General Elder Scrolls Discussion
« Reply #2166 on: August 31, 2018, 04:14:20 AM »
You have discovered the thirty-seventh Sermon of Vivec, which is a bending of the light, long past the chronicles of the Hortator who wore inconstant faces and ruled however they would, until apocalypse.

Vivec was borne by ribbons of water, which wrote their starward couplings in red. This was a new place of speed. His eyes broke on the spikes above the tower, where the Void Ghost squatted over a drake-scaled drum, imbecile in its rhythm. And he asked of it:

"Who are you, that need no signature at all?"

Three in sum, the robes of Ayem stretched towards the bright black rim of memory, roping an arc of purchase. This was a new sprinting task. And Seht held his swollen belly to its name, clockmaker's daughter, swimming the dead confession along a century of thread, Naming her, uneaten, a golden cache of Veloth and Velothi, for where else would they know to go?

"Go here: world without wheel, charting zero deaths, and echoes singing," Seht said, until all of it was done, and in the center was anything whatever.

And the red moment became a great howling unchecked, for the Provisional House was in ruin. And Vivec became as glass, a lamp, for the dragon's mane had broke, and the red moon bade him come.

"The sign of royalty is not this," a signal blueshift (female) told him, "There is no right lesson learned alone."

He refused the twine on her catching net, spiteful that an uncontinued people would not become fuller by their searching, and yet were wracked in their spirits for flight. But the male signals were offended, and Vivec took a fighting form. He undid his eastern light, saying to the ALMSIVI that through war, they had become brides in glass, which no power could observe.

The light bent, and Vivec donned a cuirass made of red plates of jewel, and a mask that marked him born in the lands of Man. Wheeling, he spread into an insect salve, worn on the neck of hist-bulbs when at challenge. He roared up and fed his fingers to mammoth ghosts. The signal fires wondered if they mistook this for surrender, for Vivec had told the void that he could learn to undo it all.

The light bent, and somewhere a history was finally undone. Of it, Vivec remembered the laughing of the netchimen of his village when the hunts were good. He marched with his father in the ash, growing strong in the hooks and sail, able to run a junk through silt. At eleven, he sung to an ashkhan. He became sick after Red Mountain, with the nix-blood and fever, and was infirm a hundred years. His mother survived him and laid his body at the altar of Padhome. She gave him her skin to wear into the underworld.

The light bent, and Vivec awoke and grew fangs, unwilling to make of herself a folding thing. This was a new and lunar promise. And in her Biting she tunneled up and then downward, while her brother and sister smeared across heaven, thin ruptures of dissent, food for scarabs and the Worm. She took her people and made them safe, and sat with Azura drawing her own husband's likeness in the dirt.

"For I have removed my left hand and my right, he will say," she said, "for that is how I shall win against them. Love alone and you shall know only mistakes of salt."

The worlding of the words is AMARANTH.
ur retartet but u donut even no it and i walnut tell u y