Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2019, 07:40:15 PM »
Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image.
Not exactly, but it demonstrates the principle. A principle you actually do understand. The pictures you have posted of train lines also demonstrate it. The tracks are parallel but they don’t look parallel. Quite why you are pretending not to understand this is puzzling, especially as this problem, if it were a problem, would apply to the FE sun as much as it would to the RE one.
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

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Online Bad Puppy

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2019, 08:10:44 PM »
Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image.

Then you try it and post your picture, Tom.  Better yet, Put some posts in the ground on a sunny day nice and straight, along a straight line, and make them the same height, just light the picture.  Measure their distance from one another.  Then Look at their shadows.  Measure the distance between the points of the shadows for adjacent posts (that's why the height is important to be equal).  Measure the angles between the shadows and the line of posts (that's why it's important to have them in a straight line).  Write it all down.  Stand back, and take a picture, just like this one.  Report your findings.
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Do you have any evidence of reality?

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Offline Bobby Shafto

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2019, 08:52:17 PM »
Wise's photos are valid. Some of those shadows are pointing in different relation to the street or sidewalk. It doesn't matter if the picture is a wide-angle lense or not. A wide-angle lense isn't going to make a shadow that's pointing towards the street to run along the sidewalk or vice versa.

This is caused by a fisheye lens?



Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image.

How 'bout this? Candles and skewers:



No fisheye. No panorama. Are those skewers parallel?

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2019, 09:17:53 PM »
Quote
Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image

It doesn't have to look like the original photo to demonstrate the same principle Tom. Fact is you have shadows either side of where the photographers stand point is and the direction of the shadows swaps over either side of that point.  What is the original photo supposed to demonstrate in FE theory then?

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2019, 10:14:19 PM »
Wise's photos are valid. Some of those shadows are pointing in different relation to the street or sidewalk. It doesn't matter if the picture is a wide-angle lense or not. A wide-angle lense isn't going to make a shadow that's pointing towards the street to run along the sidewalk or vice versa.

This is caused by a fisheye lens?

http://photos.imageevent.com/datacable/apollo/icons/shadows61.jpg[

Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image.

How 'bout this? Candles and skewers:

http://oi63.tinypic.com/fehvs0.jpg

No fisheye. No panorama. Are those skewers parallel?

Kitchen lights around the kitchen aren't a 93 million mile distant sun with parallel light.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 10:23:02 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2019, 10:16:13 PM »
I didn't think the Sun was 93 million miles away in your world.

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2019, 10:21:30 PM »
Wise's photos are valid. Some of those shadows are pointing in different relation to the street or sidewalk. It doesn't matter if the picture is a wide-angle lense or not. A wide-angle lense isn't going to make a shadow that's pointing towards the street to run along the sidewalk or vice versa.

This is caused by a fisheye lens?



Unfortunately that looks nothing like the image.

How 'bout this? Candles and skewers:



No fisheye. No panorama. Are those skewers parallel?

Kitchen lights around the kitchen aren't 93 million miles distant sun's with parallel light sources.

Seems to me no lights involved, just candles and skewers and one of your favorite topics, perspective. 

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2019, 10:23:38 PM »
Please point out the area in the image where "no lights [are] involved".
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 10:25:44 PM by Tom Bishop »

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2019, 10:24:58 PM »
Wise's photos are valid. Some of those shadows are pointing in different relation to the street or sidewalk. It doesn't matter if the picture is a wide-angle lense or not. A wide-angle lense isn't going to make a shadow that's pointing towards the street to run along the sidewalk or vice versa.

This is caused by a fisheye lens?


The shadows are exactly parallel.

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2019, 10:34:51 PM »
Please point out the area in the image where "no lights [are] involved".

I'm talking about Bobby's image. Candles (unlit) and skewers. No lights. The skewers are parallel yet, due to perspective, don't look so. Just like your image with the shadows. And what does this have to do with a spotlight sun and why it can't be seen when in darkness?

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Offline Bobby Shafto

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2019, 10:41:17 PM »

Kitchen lights around the kitchen aren't a 93 million mile distant sun with parallel light.
Of course they aren't. The lights are not part of the physical model analogy in my image. The sticks (skewers) are. Are they parallel?

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2019, 10:43:17 PM »
Quote
And what does this have to do with a spotlight sun and why it can't be seen when in darkness?


Agreed any chance to getting back to the original question please?

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Offline Bobby Shafto

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2019, 10:48:05 PM »
Did I fall for Tom diverging off topic again? 

I just saw the image of posts and shadows and the errant interpretation that those shadows could be caused by a "band of light" and not from a single light source.

I don't want to be accused of trying to "suppress" Tom by joining in the call to get back on topic, but I'll not contribute more to the issue of that image if it is, in fact, off topic.

For the record, those skewers in my image are parallel, just as the shadows in the picture of those posts are. 

Edit to add: parallel shadows from an actual 93 million mile distant sun:

« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 11:36:19 PM by Bobby Shafto »

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2019, 10:55:47 PM »
And just as the rays of the Sun are parallel from 93 million miles distant.  Did you notice that subtle slip of the mind there when Tom seemed to admit about the Sun being 93 million miles distant.  Back to my original question, how can something like the Sun which is emitting light from all over its surface act like a spotlight?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 10:57:21 PM by shootingstar »

Offline JCM

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2019, 06:46:32 PM »
A step by step approach regarding the Sun might be better....


1.  Is the Sun a sphere?  If not, why not?
2.  Does light emanate from every surface of the Sun? If not, then explain...
3.  If a spherical Sun emanates light from all of its surface, why does it spotlight? 

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2019, 07:22:51 PM »
A step by step approach regarding the Sun might be better....


1.  Is the Sun a sphere?  If not, why not?
2.  Does light emanate from every surface of the Sun? If not, then explain...
3.  If a spherical Sun emanates light from all of its surface, why does it spotlight?
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Perspective according to one version of FE, electromagnetic acceleration according to another.

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2019, 08:56:45 PM »
A step by step approach regarding the Sun might be better....


1.  Is the Sun a sphere?  If not, why not?
2.  Does light emanate from every surface of the Sun? If not, then explain...
3.  If a spherical Sun emanates light from all of its surface, why does it spotlight?
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Perspective according to one version of FE, electromagnetic acceleration according to another.

If it’s yes, yes then EAT is even in a worse position since light if it bends that much it makes no sense to explain anything as the light rays coming from every point on a spherical Sun would negate bending as needed for EAT to shine on undersides of clouds for example. 

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2019, 09:54:54 PM »
So we have a spherical Sun which is radiating light from all parts of its surface. That means light is being emitted out into the space in the form of an expanding (with distance) spherical shell. That means the Sun will shine with equal brightness regardless of which direction you view it from.


So now lets say that a sphere of light is situated above a flat surface as depicted by the flat Earth diagram on the FAQ page.  Regardless of whether you put the Sun 3000 miles or 93 million miles from the flat surface of Earth you will not get just a specific region of the flat surface illuminated at any one time. The nature of light simply won't allow that to work.  You would need to have some kind of mask between the Sun and the flat surface to restrict the areas exposed to direct sunlight.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 09:58:01 PM by shootingstar »

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Offline Bobby Shafto

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Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2019, 10:35:40 PM »
I'll hazard an attempt to articulate what Tom has been attempting to say is the explanation.

It's not a "literal spotlight."  It's not the sun that is shaded from illuminating in certain directions. It's the atmo- (air) through which the sun is shining that is doing the shading.

When the sunlight has to penetrate less air mass, that is when we see it "projected upon the atmoplane." But at longer distances, when the angle of the sun is shallower, the air eventually becomes opaque to the sun and hence the sunlight won't penetrate it and for those in darkness, there is no "projection upon the atmoplane" due to that opaqueness.

This is not the cause of sunset. That's either a perspective effect or light bending upward. Even after sunset (or before sunrise) there is twilight because the sun's light is beginning to penetrate the air as the angle becomes shallower and thus less air to pass through.

If I have that wrong, I apologize; I can't claim to be able to fully apprehend it since I give it so little credence. It's more like a meteorological explanation than an atmoplanar one, and day/night would vary due to weather more so than characteristic atmo- opacity.

There's also the issue of the magnification effect claimed for which the atmolayer, with increasing density, magnifies the sun such that it maintains its apparent angular size despite receding into the distance. It's a remarkable confluence of features: atmolayer shading, magnification and perspective (or EAT) that causes the sun to appear to rise and set while all the while actually being some distance over a flat earth.

And this still doesn't explain the lateral displacement of the projected sun from the actual sun, but that's an issue pending explanation on another topic. Still, I hope I've gotten the "spotlight" "projection on the atmoplane" thing right.

Re: Solar spotlight
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2019, 11:08:20 PM »
Projected Sun, apparent Sun...what does all this mean?.   How about this idea...?

Sun emits light into space. Sun facing side of Earth is in daylight, other side is in darkness (night). Rotation of Earth means all parts of Earth surface experience 'day' and 'night' over a 24hr period. No need for apparent or projected Suns which actually don't exist. Atmosphere surrounding Earth scatters some of the light and turns the sky blue as seen from the surface. It also protects us from harmful non-visible radiation also emitted by the Sun.

These ideas about apparent Suns and projected Suns is just being created in order to make what we see fit in with a hypothesised flat Earth.  You can disagree with this by all means but I doubt you can prove it wrong.