The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« on: December 13, 2018, 05:02:58 AM »
Hey all. Here's a question I've been wondering about. There's a website which shows you where on earth the ISS will be travelling over and when. What exactly is the ISS in the flat earth model? How come it can be observed using fairly run of the mill telescopes and cameras? Numerous photographers worldwide have captured the ISS during a transit of the moon. It is surprisingly easy to do! I personally observed the ISS pass over my city using a pretty cheap telescope I got when I was a kid. The beautiful thing about stuff like this is that it is objectively verifiable; you too can go outside with a Nikon P900, look up the date and location of the next lunar transit of the ISS, and then take pictures of it in transit! More expensive telescopes exist which can, and have taken high resolution pictures of the ISS, although you can't do this yourself unless you can afford a multi million dollar telescope!

Offline iamcpc

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Re: The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2018, 12:09:28 AM »
Hey all. Here's a question I've been wondering about. There's a website which shows you where on earth the ISS will be travelling over and when. What exactly is the ISS in the flat earth model?

There are many different explanations I've read on these forums. I'll list a few:

1. A meteor or meteorite
2. A balloon
3. Some sort of high altitude plane
4. A high altitude earth lab
5. Some sort of projection/hologram
6. You can't. Any video/photograph of the ISS is fake.
7. A giant flying solar panel.



How come it can be observed using fairly run of the mill telescopes and cameras?

Because they designed "it" to be visible.

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Offline Bad Puppy

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Re: The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2018, 04:10:18 AM »
There are many different explanations I've read on these forums. I'll list a few:

1. A meteor or meteorite
2. A balloon
3. Some sort of high altitude plane
4. A high altitude earth lab
5. Some sort of projection/hologram
6. You can't. Any video/photograph of the ISS is fake.
7. A giant flying solar panel.


You missed one:

8. It's the ISS in space.

You must be open to the possibility that the earth may be a sphere and space travel is not a conspiracy and in fact really does exist. 
Quote from: Tom Bishop
...circles do not exist and pi is not 3.14159...

Quote from: totallackey
Do you have any evidence of reality?

ShootingStar

Re: The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2018, 11:33:25 AM »
I have seen the ISS in a telescope enough times to know that it is very real. A friend and I use two main websites (calsky.com and heavens-above.com) to obtain accurate pass information so we can have our equipment set up and ready in advance.

A student who attends the school where I work has also developed his own method of imaging the ISS through his 130mm reflector and webcam. To say he has only been imaging for a couple of years his results are excellent. You can see the orientation of the ISS change with angle as it passes. He has acquired enough detail to see the Soyuz craft docked.

It is particularly good when you get a transit of the ISS across the Moon or the Sun. An event that lasts typically less than a second so you have to be ready!   Calsky.com is an excellent resources for that.  Meteors of course are entirely unpredictable other than to say you get an average of 6 sporadics an hour. Rates go up during more active meteor showers but even then you can never be sure when or exactly where they will appear.  If you aim your camera at the radiant during an active shower you may be fortunate enough to catch a point meteor which is a meteor travelling directly towards the camera.

Offline edby

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Re: The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2018, 11:50:42 AM »
I have seen the ISS in a telescope enough times to know that it is very real. A friend and I use two main websites (calsky.com and heavens-above.com) to obtain accurate pass information so we can have our equipment set up and ready in advance.

A student who attends the school where I work has also developed his own method of imaging the ISS through his 130mm reflector and webcam. To say he has only been imaging for a couple of years his results are excellent. You can see the orientation of the ISS change with angle as it passes. He has acquired enough detail to see the Soyuz craft docked.

It is particularly good when you get a transit of the ISS across the Moon or the Sun. An event that lasts typically less than a second so you have to be ready!   Calsky.com is an excellent resources for that.  Meteors of course are entirely unpredictable other than to say you get an average of 6 sporadics an hour. Rates go up during more active meteor showers but even then you can never be sure when or exactly where they will appear.  If you aim your camera at the radiant during an active shower you may be fortunate enough to catch a point meteor which is a meteor travelling directly towards the camera.
So if the ISS were merely a high altitude balloon travelling through the upper atmosphere, say at 100,000 feet (as some have claimed), how fast would it have to be travelling?

Offline ChrisTP

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Re: The ISS, and how can people see it with telescopes?
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2018, 12:11:34 PM »
I have seen the ISS in a telescope enough times to know that it is very real. A friend and I use two main websites (calsky.com and heavens-above.com) to obtain accurate pass information so we can have our equipment set up and ready in advance.

A student who attends the school where I work has also developed his own method of imaging the ISS through his 130mm reflector and webcam. To say he has only been imaging for a couple of years his results are excellent. You can see the orientation of the ISS change with angle as it passes. He has acquired enough detail to see the Soyuz craft docked.

It is particularly good when you get a transit of the ISS across the Moon or the Sun. An event that lasts typically less than a second so you have to be ready!   Calsky.com is an excellent resources for that.  Meteors of course are entirely unpredictable other than to say you get an average of 6 sporadics an hour. Rates go up during more active meteor showers but even then you can never be sure when or exactly where they will appear.  If you aim your camera at the radiant during an active shower you may be fortunate enough to catch a point meteor which is a meteor travelling directly towards the camera.
So if the ISS were merely a high altitude balloon travelling through the upper atmosphere, say at 100,000 feet (as some have claimed), how fast would it have to be travelling?
Still 27,600 km/h to make it's way round the world in the time it does.
Tom is wrong most of the time. Hardly big news, don't you think?