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Offline junker

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #60 on: November 07, 2018, 11:05:56 PM »
One thing that seems common place among FET is to throw in a plethora of complicated garbble, mostly irrelevant to the subject,  that takes an extremely high level of education to understand. I guess this is an attempt to confuse people in hopes that they will think, "wow he must be really smart so therefor he must be right".
Unfortunately for FET most people on this forum are educated, highly intelligent, have gone out into the real and gained experiences of their and can see this is nothing less than the antics of a "con man". My 6th grade nephew once told me that calculating distances is easy. Also the distance from Santiago to Sydney is well know. A 6th grader. Yet Flat Earthers can't do it without using RE technology. go figure.
Just one more mind boggling thing about FET believers.       

How about you keep your anti-FE rants in the Angry Ranting forum? This post has nothing to do with the topic, and only serves for you to soapbox about your disdain for FE. You have been warned multiple times about this over the last month. Have a few days off to review the rules.

HorstFue

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #61 on: November 07, 2018, 11:37:38 PM »
Ask any round-the-world sailor and they will quickly tell you the stormiest seas, stirred by the strongest winds, are found in the Southern Ocean. These infamously rough latitudes are labelled the "roaring 40s", "furious 50s" and "screaming 60s". ”
The Southern Ocean not the Southern Hemisphere
Main reason: This region has the longest stretches of open water. The longer the stretches on open water are, the greater surface wind force can build up, the longer is the fetch, the higher the waves.
Surface Winds (measured in 10m hight) have no direct connection to high altitude wind systems or Jet Streams. Ok, an influence on the general weather cannot be denied.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #62 on: November 08, 2018, 03:52:22 AM »
Ask any round-the-world sailor and they will quickly tell you the stormiest seas, stirred by the strongest winds, are found in the Southern Ocean. These infamously rough latitudes are labelled the "roaring 40s", "furious 50s" and "screaming 60s". ”
The Southern Ocean not the Southern Hemisphere
Main reason: This region has the longest stretches of open water. The longer the stretches on open water are, the greater surface wind force can build up, the longer is the fetch, the higher the waves.
Surface Winds (measured in 10m hight) have no direct connection to high altitude wind systems or Jet Streams. Ok, an influence on the general weather cannot be denied.
.

Jeran took us through several levels of altitude in his video
"The biggest problem in astronomy is that when we look at something in the sky, we don’t know how far away it is" — Pauline Barmby, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #63 on: November 08, 2018, 04:04:42 AM »
Ask any round-the-world sailor and they will quickly tell you the stormiest seas, stirred by the strongest winds, are found in the Southern Ocean. These infamously rough latitudes are labelled the "roaring 40s", "furious 50s" and "screaming 60s". ”
The Southern Ocean not the Southern Hemisphere
Main reason: This region has the longest stretches of open water. The longer the stretches on open water are, the greater surface wind force can build up, the longer is the fetch, the higher the waves.
Surface Winds (measured in 10m hight) have no direct connection to high altitude wind systems or Jet Streams. Ok, an influence on the general weather cannot be denied.
.

Jeran took us through several levels of altitude in his video
On the "usual FE map" I believe simple map scaling indicates that Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km.
A typical QANTAS flight QF27 takes roughly 12 hours (sometimes less). That would make the plane's average ground-speed about 2080 km/hr. Since the cruising speed of a B747-400 is 933 km/h that would require a tail-wind of about 1150 km/hr.

That seems way above any wind speed observed anywhere. Any comments?

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #64 on: November 08, 2018, 12:07:19 PM »
On the "usual FE map" I believe simple map scaling indicates that Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km.
Your belief is wrong.

There are exactly the same amount of lines of longitude depicted on the AE map as there are on the Mercator.
I didn't say (conversion of) thermal energy wasn't involved at all.
A rocket does not create thrust by converting thermal energy.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #65 on: November 08, 2018, 12:43:30 PM »
On the "usual FE map" I believe simple map scaling indicates that Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km.
Your belief is wrong.

There are exactly the same amount of lines of longitude depicted on the AE map as there are on the Mercator.
True, but that is not the main issue. The spacing between those longitude lines is also extremely important:
  • on the Globe, starts at zero (km/degree) at the North Pole, reaches a maximum (of 111 km/deg) on the Equator and drops to zero again at the South Pole,

  • on the Mercator Projection, stays constant at all latitudes (but the scale of that projection is known to be correct only at the equator) and
  • on the AE map starts from zero (km/deg) at the North Pole increases to about 175 km/deg at the Equator and finally to 349 km/deg around the "rim".[/li
If you want to check on my "Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km" just scale it off an AEP map, such as Gleason's.
.
The Wiki states that:
Quote
Erathostenes on Diameter
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Therefore we can take the distance of 500 nautical miles, multiply by 25, and find that the radius of the flat earth is about 12,250 nautical miles. Doubling that figure for the diameter we get a figure of 25,000 miles.
The Wiki's 500 nautical miles" should be 500 statute miles - check it yourself if you like.
This 25,000 miles is almost the same as 40,000 km and this can be easily used to scale that map.

No great accuracy is needed because the difference the quote airline route distance and the AEP map distance is so great.

Offline iamcpc

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #66 on: November 08, 2018, 10:46:18 PM »
Although I usually don't promote the Monopole model, this question is answered by the wider Flat Earth community in the traditional FE model.
The Southern Hemisphere appears to be special place which has much stronger winds than the Northern Hemisphere:

The problem with this is that the flight times are pretty consistent. If winds blowing had a significant impact on flight times we would expect to see planes getting good winds and arriving hours early or hours late.

Furthermore we don't see situations where the same plane makes the trip from Chile to Australia much faster or slower than the same trip the other way.



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Offline stack

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Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #67 on: November 09, 2018, 12:26:18 AM »
On the "usual FE map" I believe simple map scaling indicates that Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km.
Your belief is wrong.

There are exactly the same amount of lines of longitude depicted on the AE map as there are on the Mercator.

The number of lines of longitude on an AE map versus any other is not relevant to this. In your belief system the airlines and their south of the equator routes are being flown incorrectly. So either they are wrong or you are.
Not much is known about the celestial bodies and their distances.

Curiosity File

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #68 on: November 13, 2018, 10:23:44 PM »
Although I usually don't promote the Monopole model, this question is answered by the wider Flat Earth community in the traditional FE model.
The Southern Hemisphere appears to be special place which has much stronger winds than the Northern Hemisphere:

The problem with this is that the flight times are pretty consistent. If winds blowing had a significant impact on flight times we would expect to see planes getting good winds and arriving hours early or hours late.

Furthermore we don't see situations where the same plane makes the trip from Chile to Australia much faster or slower than the same trip the other way.
Commercial flights adjust their seep,(and path) dictated by winds. However most are slight adjustments unless they are lucky enough to use the jet steam. I'm sure most know what the jet stream is. It's a small tube of fast moving air that changes speeds and location seasonally. Commercial flights are time sensitive and adjust their speed to TA scheduled. However private flights do arrive early when they can utilize the winds in their favor. 
The problem, however, with FE map distances is no jets fuel capacity will allow it to make that 25,000 km trip without running out of fuel.  Since we know there are non stop flights both ways between Sydney and Santiago we know the FE maps in question are wrong.   
« Last Edit: November 13, 2018, 10:29:10 PM by Curiosity File »

Curiosity File

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #69 on: November 14, 2018, 01:52:52 AM »
More proof FET maps are inaccurate and flawed
We've already showed the flaws in Australia to Chile.
Lets look at FE map vs RE maps, distances and flight paths,(non stop)) from
San Fransisco to Tokyo is westward and about 5,100 mile.
New York to Tokyo is about 6,700 give or take. Again from the west across The states and Pacific ocean.
This would be impossible if the earth were flat.
Would anyone like to explain what path you would take on FE and how many miles it would be? 
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 01:59:50 AM by Curiosity File »

Curiosity File

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #70 on: November 14, 2018, 03:17:04 AM »
On the "usual FE map" I believe simple map scaling indicates that Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km.
Your belief is wrong.

There are exactly the same amount of lines of longitude depicted on the AE map as there are on the Mercator.
True, but that is not the main issue. The spacing between those longitude lines is also extremely important:
  • on the Globe, starts at zero (km/degree) at the North Pole, reaches a maximum (of 111 km/deg) on the Equator and drops to zero again at the South Pole,

  • on the Mercator Projection, stays constant at all latitudes (but the scale of that projection is known to be correct only at the equator) and
  • on the AE map starts from zero (km/deg) at the North Pole increases to about 175 km/deg at the Equator and finally to 349 km/deg around the "rim".[/li
If you want to check on my "Sydney to Santiago is over 25,000 km" just scale it off an AEP map, such as Gleason's.
.
The Wiki states that:
Quote
Erathostenes on Diameter
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Therefore we can take the distance of 500 nautical miles, multiply by 25, and find that the radius of the flat earth is about 12,250 nautical miles. Doubling that figure for the diameter we get a figure of 25,000 miles.
The Wiki's 500 nautical miles" should be 500 statute miles - check it yourself if you like.
This 25,000 miles is almost the same as 40,000 km and this can be easily used to scale that map.

No great accuracy is needed because the difference the quote airline route distance and the AEP map distance is so great.
I'd like to point out some observations from this map.
Straight line flight from Santiago To Sydney puts you in the northern hemisphere directly across the USA.
San Diego to Tokyo you would fly northward up the coast and never lose sight of land. I guessing about 8,000 miles on that map. Reality is different. It's a little over 5,000 miles out across the pacific ocean.
Where's Hawaii on that map. On RE Hawaii is southwest of San Diego about 2,500 miles 
Hawaii is southwest of San Diego. Tokyo northwest of Hawaii.
Hawaii to Tokyo is about 4,000 miles.
How far from San Diego to Hawaii then to Tokyo is it on that FE map?
Sydney to the edge of the world or ice wall on this map, really really close. That brings up a whole new set of questions.


 
 
 
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 03:24:45 AM by Curiosity File »

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #71 on: November 14, 2018, 10:21:14 AM »
More proof FET maps are inaccurate and flawed
To be fair, they don't claim to have an accurate map and say they don't have the resources to make one.
But what they don't do is look at the known distances between places and try to make a map based on those.
If you try to do so then you'll quickly find it's not possible which leaves us with two possibilities
a) The earth isn't flat, or
b) The distances are wrong and the global airline and shipping industry don't actually know how far things are apart or how fast their vessels move despite reliably getting people and goods around the earth every day.
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Curiosity File

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #72 on: November 14, 2018, 06:21:37 PM »
More proof FET maps are inaccurate and flawed
To be fair, they don't claim to have an accurate map and say they don't have the resources to make one.
But what they don't do is look at the known distances between places and try to make a map based on those.
If you try to do so then you'll quickly find it's not possible which leaves us with two possibilities
a) The earth isn't flat, or
b) The distances are wrong and the global airline and shipping industry don't actually know how far things are apart or how fast their vessels move despite reliably getting people and goods around the earth every day.
I did more research and believe it or not that 25,000 km is almost accurate if you go to Seattle from Santiago then to Sydney. Seattle, or there about in the USA, is in the flight path on that FE map.
So yeah, stop in New Mexico or somewhere in the United States on your way Ha!.
Change the destination to Perth from Santiago, that flight path would take you over Canada, Russia, and the North pole.

Re: Australia & Chile FET how far apart?
« Reply #73 on: November 17, 2018, 07:15:34 PM »
Nothing about Flat Earth matches reality. This guy created a great web site that indudes a FE digital model so you can do the reality check yourself

http://walter.bislins.ch/bloge/index.asp