Offline Mysfit

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Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« on: October 21, 2018, 09:11:11 PM »
Hello,
I have seen quite a few posts on the fora recently about not being sure on what the flat theory is.
Does it require a dome, is it infinite underneath and various other questions that don't have a clear opinion on.
It doesn't really make sense to debate something that isn't clearly defined, as the parameters can be changed person to person.
I was therefore baffled when I could not find a page on the wiki. Searching 'theory' only comes up with 2, one of which is praising how the theory brought everyone on this forum together.
The wiki definitely needs this page.

I am not sure how a wiki page for the flat theory would be written, but I can see that it would need to link to various other pages, UA, Earth etc.
It might also be a good idea to indicate how it contrasts with round theory and maybe how it is the same.
For example,
ROUND                   FLAT
Gravity        Universal Acceleration
Orbit           (not sure on this one)
       Tectonic plates

With this, I think it might give someone who has a round understanding a clear idea of where they could be mistaken, maybe with links on each of the flat ones to the specific chunks of the wiki.

Now that i'm thinking about it, the contrasts with common understanding may be a good wiki page on it's own. Could get pretty big.

Hope that helps, lemme know what you think.

« Last Edit: October 21, 2018, 09:13:24 PM by Mysfit »

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Offline stack

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2018, 06:29:41 AM »
Something along these lines?


Offline Mysfit

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2018, 01:33:35 PM »
That is much better, yes.
Maybe with a little link on each of the figures or an asterisk for the calculations and a few more lines for concepts and such.
I know we don't yet have those calculations, which would lead me to attempting to do them myself, but I'm sure they're being dug up.

Offline Mysfit

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2018, 05:39:10 PM »
Further to the above, a recent quote due to the lack of this page.
The only misunderstanding is on your part in terms of what our arguments are. No one has made those arguments. You are falling for Twitter troll memes.

This argument came about from a round theorist who has a lot of time clocked here. And even they are uncertain.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2018, 05:56:39 PM »
I have never liked the term "Flat Earth Theory." Although I have used it in the past to refer to FE, I actually think this term should be abolished.

I believe it to be a movement of empirical discovery of our world, and is not about one particular theory or idea.

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Offline stack

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2018, 06:31:52 PM »
Should this site be the "Zetetic Society" instead of "The Flat Earth Society"? The latter is decidedly FET centric.

Offline Mysfit

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2018, 05:16:33 PM »
I have never liked the term "Flat Earth Theory." Although I have used it in the past to refer to FE, I actually think this term should be abolished.
I have recently wondered how a zetetic mindset can lead to any agreed theory.
It is the problem with the child's mindset that Rowbotham praises. Constantly asking "why?".
"Fearlessly, anxiously, and without the slightest regard to consequences, question after question, in rapid and exciting succession, will often proceed from a child, until the most profound in learning and philosophy"
http://www.sacred-texts.com/earth/za/za04.htm
I don't know about other folks, but I would not consider a child a source of profound learning and philosophy. The little mites.

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Offline RonJ

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2018, 02:42:22 AM »
The round earth theory provides for the gravitational attraction between the moon and the earth.  The wiki on this site shows the moon orbiting above the flat earth in a big circle.  I can see how the moon might keep it's distance constant by the UA force flowing around the sides of the flat earth.  That force couldn't be used to keep the moon in it's constant orbit.  To do that would require a vector component that was at a constant right angle to the surface of the moon and always pointed at the center of rotation.  You could also postulate some kind of force of attraction that could do the job as well.  In any event for FET to be believable you will need some theory that keeps the moon, as well as the sun, in orbit over the Earth.  It looks like the Sun would be an even bigger job because that orbit must vary in radius to account for the seasons. 
For FE no explanation is possible, for RE no explanation is necessary.

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Online Pete Svarrior

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Re: Wiki - The Flat Earth Theory
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2018, 07:28:08 AM »
Mysfit, Flat Earth Projects is not your personal Q&A section to ask questions about things you don't understand about the theory.  You need to learn the basics before you try to work on the Wiki.

I'm locking this thread, and I implore you to stop flooding this board with your non-contributions. You have now made 10 threads here, most of dubious content. If you can't use this hoard responsibly, then I'll have to request that your access to it be restricted.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2018, 07:30:43 AM by Pete Svarrior »
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