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Offline Snupes

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1880 on: February 17, 2018, 06:31:44 AM »
Justice League (Zack Snyder/Joss Whedon, 2017)

Wow. Watched it with my friends. That may be the worst DC movie I've seen. I'm so burned out I don't even want to write about it. Writing was trash, Barry was cringe, Batman was useless, Cyborg looked awful, Aquaman was cringey dudebro, Wonder Woman was ok, Superman was OP. The story is everyone is useless until Zack Snyder wanks Superman to life, has him show up everyone, then win everything. End movie.

That was bad.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2018, 05:03:54 PM by Snupes »
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Offline Dither

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1881 on: February 23, 2018, 02:26:05 PM »
Black Panther.

So everyone's going ape over this movie and I get that this is a good start towards a marvel universe that celebrates rather than denigrates African culture (a big plus) but my own expectations of this thing (after reading all the glowing reviews) was so massive, that when I finally watched it I found myself tearing it apart instead of just enjoying it the way I enjoyed Ragnarok. Anyway, its an ok movie with some fun characters whom I couldn't have cared less about if they lived or died. But the best part is the civilisation itself, its so interesting, plenty of dynamics between the different tribes and an awesome empire to boot and that's where this movie really excels, IMO 
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Offline Snupes

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1882 on: March 05, 2018, 06:24:44 AM »
Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)

I can't stop crying. Help.
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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1883 on: March 05, 2018, 12:49:39 PM »
Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)

I can't stop crying. Help.

Poo
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Offline Roundy

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1884 on: March 07, 2018, 03:26:14 PM »
Death Wish, 2018 (minor spoilers ahead and they're not marked)

I just wish I knew this would be so politically charged before I went to see it. It worked well enough as a revenge thriller when it wasn't coming off like a love letter to the NRA. The problem is that I see a Bruce Willis action film for its escapist value, not to be preached at. Maybe what's most frustrating is that it pretends to be even-handed and show both sides of the issue. So you have Mancow on one side, coming off like a right wing lunatic, praising the job Willis's character is doing, and on the other side is Sway, former black MTV VJ, and his only argument against Willis's character seems to be that there's a white guy out there shooting black men, which given how many Latinos and white men Willis kills isn't even a fair characterization of what he's doing.

And it takes the "police are useless" trope to whole new levels. There's a "joke" early on where Willis is looking at the big board in the police station and it's covered with cards representing unsolved homicides. " We're gonna need a bigger board!" some wit wrote in the corner. Lol, right? And meanwhile Hank from "Breaking Bad" and his multi-culti female black partner stumble through the film trying to figure out who the vigilante is, never getting any closer despite regular contact with Willis all the way through. The vigilante is left-handed. The vigilante had no prior experience firing a weapon. The vigilante injured his hand. They ( well, Hank anyway, I honestly don't remember his partner contributing anything to the investigation except being female and black) are able to figure all this out and they still never even suspect Willis until the very end, at which point they ignore that he's essentially a mass murderer and look the other way. I tell ya, the cops can't be counted on for nothin'!

The message the movie pushes? Vigilantism is probably a little extreme, but you and your family are victims waiting to be murdered if you don't own a gun. At least in Chicago where the police are literally useless.

There's also some cringeworthy torture to go with the cringeworthy politics.

Still I would give this movie 2.5 stars out of 5 if I was rating it because a lot of the action was quite good and so were most of the performances. If it wasn't straight up propaganda I'm sure I would have left the theater with a more positive opinion.
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Offline Ghost Spaghetti

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1885 on: March 07, 2018, 04:48:28 PM »
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency Season 2

As a fan of the books, and the BBC Miniseries, I found it tough to get into the first season of DG. The character is completely different and I really don't like the Government Conspiracy layer they've added, or Elijah Woods' character.

Season 2 is even more bizarre than the first season and features more of the 'holistic' people, including a holistic actor who can shape-shift into anything ("Why would I change into a bear, silly? If I wanted to kill you all, I'd turn into an aircraft carrier and crush this facility." "Please... don't?") and a kid who can create things with his mind.

All my criticisms of Season 1 still stand, Elijah Woods' character is annoyingly out of place, the government conspiracy seems tacked on and superfluous, even as it becomes pretty much a central part of the plot. As before, the tone whiplashes between zany humour and deadpan seriousness (and sometimes zany seriousness) without any attempt at consistency, and the whole thing feels like it could have done with another pass to cut out some of the sheer amount of stuff happening.

That said, the chemistry between some of the characters is a joy to watch, it keeps up a fun, quick pace, and there's still a sense of achievement when you finally 'get' some of the connections.

Good series, but if it gets picked up by another network, it really needs to iron out some of the longstanding bugs.

7/10

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Offline Sean

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1886 on: March 12, 2018, 02:17:48 AM »
Shape of Water [spoilers]

I really appreciated the acting,  especially Sally Hawkins,  and the cinematography was good but I can't get over the story. A mute woman feeds a humanoid creature eggs and then they bang. Just a bit weird.

Get  Out

this movie was really good

Jessica Jones season 2

I enjoyed this,  I think the second half it gets better.

Lady Bird

Cute movie, feel like it's been a bit overrated by critics
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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1887 on: March 23, 2018, 08:51:24 PM »
Since Saddam wants more capeshit reviews, here's something even shorter and less satisfying than the average sex scene in...

Jessica Jones Season 2

I like this season a lot more than the first, although in many ways it is probably worse. Mostly I found it highly enjoyable because it was wacky and I found it hard to guess where the constantly twisting plot would go next. A lot of the "shocking reveals" made me laugh out loud, and some of the dialogue is so boneheadedly bad that it was like watching a neo-noir soap opera. The sex scenes are still boring and pointless, way too many shirtless men humping women wrapped up in bedsheets, because heaven forbid we should catch a glimpse of a female nipple, and don't even get me started on the half-arsed lesbo coke orgy/seniors' underwear dance party. Not even the worst of them, sadly, was as hilarious as Simpson going down on Trish in the first season, or as ridiculous as Luke Cage flirting by breaking power tools on his abs, so it's mostly just gasping morons pressed up against each other. Fortunately, most of the show is hilarious, because it is so fucking ridiculous. Jessica herself still has the 1950s B-movie Damsel problem of going through one terrible thing after another yet still having perfect make-up and hair, and I much prefer the haggard depiction of the character in the original Alias comic.

Despite the problems I have with it, JJ2 is a lot of fun, and I would definitely rank it among my favourite seasons of Marvel's Netflix stuff so far.

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Offline rooster

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1888 on: March 25, 2018, 01:12:34 AM »
First season was better thanks to Kilgrave.

Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1889 on: March 26, 2018, 02:06:35 PM »
just watched season 6 of homeland.  definitely my favorite season since season 1.

this show decided to be the wire and brutally take from me every character i love.  dang.  i was especially sad when the fbi agent gets murdered.  i was just starting to warm up to him.

my only real complaint is the final bits of the finale.  keane goes from "i am now a national security hawk," to "i am now stalin," in the span of like two scenes.  i mean in one scene she's offering carrie a job as senior adviser, and the next she's arresting everyone and ignoring carrie's phone calls.  idgi. 

that said, i'm excited for this plot to unfold next season.
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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1890 on: March 27, 2018, 10:35:35 AM »
Thor 3:
Good but not as funny as Gardians of the Galaxy 1.

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Offline Snupes

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1891 on: April 11, 2018, 08:35:21 PM »
Howl's Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki, 2004)

Surely two Ghibli movies in a row won't make me sob like a baby? Surely, as a functional adult, now that I know what to expect from them, I should be able to make it to the end of one with a dry face, right? THINK AGAIN, APPARENTLY. MY EYES ARE WATERFALLS.
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Offline Cain

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1892 on: April 12, 2018, 05:43:10 PM »
Howl's Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki, 2004)

Surely two Ghibli movies in a row won't make me sob like a baby? Surely, as a functional adult, now that I know what to expect from them, I should be able to make it to the end of one with a dry face, right? THINK AGAIN, APPARENTLY. MY EYES ARE WATERFALLS.
I feel your pain.
You just made my list, buddy.  >:(
this world does not have room for another mind as intelligent as yours.

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Offline honk

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1893 on: April 26, 2018, 04:27:28 AM »
The Defenders

What a disappointment. In many ways, this show had the deck stacked against it for having to pick up where the disastrous Iron Fist left off. We're stuck with the boring interpretation of the Hand as a more generic criminal organization rather than a ninja clan, several characters having their motivations and allegiances blatantly retconned for simplicity's sake, a depleted budget revealing a very, very cheap production, and arguably worst of all, one of the four main characters coming across as a shadow compared to the other three. Danny's characterization was an utter mess in Fist, with the writers seemingly unable to decide if he should be a wise kung fu monk, a gritty anti-hero, or a naïve man-child, with the end result being an obnoxious asshole with a major case of entitlement. He's nowhere near as unlikable in this show, which is definitely an improvement, but this comes at the cost of having him be incredibly bland and generic. He's at his best when he's interacting with the other Defenders, but I feel like those scenes were coasting on fan expectations rather than the characters genuinely clicking.

I'm not sure how to phrase this exactly, but I also don't like how Danny is introduced as simply chasing the main plot, while Matt, Jessica, and Luke are off living their own lives and doing their own thing, only to eventually be dragged into the greater story. It reinforces the perception that Danny is the odd one out - the one whose show was poorly received, the one who has a nonsensical characterization, and the one who has no real community ties, doesn't represent any part of New York, and is just there to move the plot along. This stuck out the most for me in the third episode when Danny decides, in response to Luke calling him out for his privilege and lack of empathy for the poor, that he should use his position to target the Hand's leaders, those with wealth and power. This could have been a great character moment and a much-needed start at addressing the criticisms of Fist's "mighty whitey" narrative - but it falls flat, because, as Colleen immediately points out, Danny isn't a businessman, a socialite, or anyone other than the guy who fights the Hand. Matt is a lawyer by day, Jessica is a private detective, Luke is essentially a kind of community organizer, and Danny...is just the guy who fights the Hand. So what follows is an incredibly awkward sequence where he hits up his company, basically says, "Yo, tell me where the Hand's bosses hang out," shows up there in a business suit, and barges into a boardroom where they're sitting, ready to kick their asses. No pretext, no cover, no subtlety, just the plot needing Danny to be in that location, so the show has to put him there, even it can barely justify doing so within the story's logic.

Speaking of the Hand, let's talk about all the retcons. I don't understand why the people behind Fist and this show felt the need to connect everyone to the Hand and/or to K'un Lun. Seriously, I really cannot imagine their thought process or what they thought they were accomplishing with it. Not everything needs to be directly connected to everything else. Did they think people would complain if they didn't tie up every loose end they could? This is an ongoing universe, one that will undoubtedly be continuing for several more years, at the very least. There will be time for all the villains and all the plot threads they can think up. There was no need to rush it so sloppily. As it is, the fact that Madame Gao is retconned into being a member of the Hand and Stick and the Chaste are retconned into being protectors of K'un Lun who serve the Iron Fist blatantly contradict both seasons of Daredevil, and perhaps even worse than that, make the universe feel small. It's lazy, unimaginative, and insults the audience's intelligence.

The Hand remain as boring and generically evil as they were in Fist, without even having the gimmick of being a silly ninja clan like they did for Daredevil's second season. And their leader is not only the worst villain of the Netflix corner of the MCU, but quite possibly the worst character overall. Sigourney Weaver is awful. Her character is awful on paper, her lines are awful, and she turns in an awful performance. Her inexpressive face, her droning monotone, her vague, inexplicable motivations, and her complete lack of charisma combine to make her a fucking drag, and every moment she's on screen turns watching the show into a chore. Shouldn't a character who's been around for centuries have a little life to them?

To continue elaborating on what I now realize was something of an unintentional thesis statement in my introduction, this show is incredibly cheap-looking. The action is generally better than it was in Fist, but there's a very generic style to it, with nothing of what made the action in Daredevil and Luke feel so unique. Matt and Danny in particular feel like interchangeable, run-of-the-mill martial artists, with very little to distinguish them. Just look at their fight scene:



A kung fu monk up against a gritty boxer/ninja should be interesting, but we get almost no sense of what's actually different about their fighting styles here. They both sucker punch each other, they both do elaborate, unnecessary flips, they both take wild swings at each other, they both parry each other's punches by sweeping their arms aside, and so on. Their fighting is so generic and interchangeable that you could reverse their roles in this fight and it wouldn't make a difference, with the obvious exception of Danny doing what he always does when he's getting his ass kicked and whipping out the Fist.

I can't blame the lack of budget entirely on the people behind Defenders and/or Fist, of course. Marvel and Netflix agreed on a lump sum of $200 million to finance all five shows years ago, and it's obvious that by 2017, Daredevil, Jessica, and Luke had swallowed up most of the money. Their showrunners were probably too extravagant, and Marvel should have stepped in earlier to make sure every show would get its share. Regardless of how it happened, though, the two latter shows had very limited budgets, and their showrunners should have recognized that and worked within their means. Trying to go all out with a story of ancient hidden cities, magic powers, dragons, ninja clans, and immortal warriors wasn't feasible with the resources at hand, and the fact that they tried to do it (in both shows) in such lazy, half-assed, tell-don't-show ways really hurt them. There's more than enough Iron Fist material not strictly related to K'un Lun/the Hand/wacky magical Asian bullshit that they could have gotten thirteen episodes out of, perhaps with a few hints towards that side of his life included, like with the Hand in Daredevil's first season. Like, they could have taken cues from Arrow and gone with a politically-aware, Robin Hood-esque approach where Danny is determined to confront the corruption within his own company and use his wealth and privilege responsibly, and so on. And if they had gotten good reviews and an audience out of that, maybe their next season would give them enough of a budget to explore his backstory, and we'd get to see K'un Lun, dragons, and the rest of it.

In short...yeah, I didn't like this. It's partially one the four pillars the show rests on being fatally weak, but even more than that, it's just basic incompetence. Shitty writing, lazy plotting, uninspired action, and a career-worst performance from Sigourney Weaver.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 02:04:50 PM by honk »
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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1894 on: April 26, 2018, 07:16:37 AM »
The Weaver we deserved.


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Offline Dither

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1895 on: April 26, 2018, 09:08:17 PM »
Yeah the Defenders was pretty lame but I kind of liked it anyway.
DD's so cool, JJ's is hip and LC is stoic,,

Danny's just there to make everyone else look great,,,
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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1896 on: April 27, 2018, 02:39:54 AM »
The budget constraint explains the hilariously bad climactic fight scene at the end of DD2. Daredevil utters that he hears more Hand soldiers than he had ever faced before and then proceeds to the building top and there is maybe a dozen. Pretty sure he took on that many in multiple episodes throughout the season.
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Offline honk

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1897 on: April 27, 2018, 04:40:49 AM »
Yeah the Defenders was pretty lame but I kind of liked it anyway.
DD's so cool, JJ's is hip and LC is stoic,,

Danny's just there to make everyone else look great,,,

Interacting with a shitty and ineffectual character doesn't make anybody look great. If anything, it drags the better character down to the bad one's level by having to acknowledge their existence and the bad story that created such a character. Danny's flaws are Fist's flaws, and Fist's flaws become flaws within the greater universe by being part of its continuity. That's one reason why I wasn't a big fan of the self-aware gimmick in Defenders where the characters relentlessly mocked Danny (and eventually beat his ass, as shown in the clip I posted). It was just calling more attention to the fact that one of its main characters was the product of awful writing.
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Offline Crudblud

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1898 on: April 27, 2018, 01:59:21 PM »
Well, since The World Unbuilt is over, I reckon it's time to get into another project. Saddam has been bugging me about this for probably a year now, so welcome to...

2018: A Batshit Odyssey

Batman (dir. Leslie H. Martinson)

The 1960s. Vietnam, flower power, Beatlemania. The good old days, when 20th Century Fox was shoving Frank Gorshin's prodigious green bulge in your face instead of terrible Spider-Man spin-offs. Yes, that's right, a time before Warner Bros. executives got their greasy mitts on Batman and turned him into a series of gruff growlers, self-serious scientists, and quizzical quippers. A time when everything was labelled and everyone spoke in alliterative exclamations of exasperation. Unfortunately, during my soujourn into those heady cultural pastures of mid-century life I did not have my ballpoint banana ready to take notes, but here's my recollection of a certain episode of Batmania that fell upon me all of a sudden in April of 2018.

To begin with, we get a SNATCHER-esque opening dedication, but rather than cyberpunks who fight against injustice every day of their lives, Batman is for crime fighters, escapists, and people who like weird things. It's more inclusive, and, since it is 2018, I'm sure we can all get behind that. Also there's a couple necking in an alleyway, which forewarns you of just how sexy this film is. Indeed, it is not long before so many male bulges, off-set at least a little by the permanently erect nipples of Lee Meriwether, are on screen at once that sometimes it can be hard, no pun intended, to know where to look! Somehow, even this is not as gay as the way Batman looks at Superman during their Dawn of Justice when the former tries to run over the latter.   

What I particularly love about our introduction to Batman and Robin in this film, and indeed the film itself, is that almost everything takes place in broad daylight. Bruce Wayne happily steps out for a night on the town with Miss Kitka (a barely disguised Catwoman) as an unwitting part of a plot to lure Batman to her secret hideout, but Batman himself likes the sun. There's no sneaking around or hiding awkwardly in the corners of rooms in order to surprised the police for no apparent reason. In fact, Batman's awkward relationship with the police is nowhere to be seen here, as he and Robin are officially recognised and deputised. He can fly around in the Bat-Copter and wave at people as he passes over head, the police even take their hats off as a sign of respect when they see him go by. It's quite literally a night and day contrast from all or most non-comic book Bat Media that has come since.

The major plot thread involves a tetrapartite conspiracy between Penguin, Catwoman, Riddler, and Joker. Joker last because, contrary to modern Bat Cinema, he isn't the main character. And no, Suicide Squad with its abysmal bit-part does not count! The wacky foursome have contrived to kidnap one Commodore Schmidlapp, an English sailor who says “pip pip”, because of course he does, and have ingeniously stored him in a replica boat (where he can catch up on his Dickens) so that they can steal his dehydration device. While this device is used to try and sneak a dehydrated army (five people) into the Batcave, the real plan is to dehydrate the leaders of nations in the United World Security Council and hold them to ransom. I guess the UN would not lend the film its official support, and it's easy to see why given that the film depicts the Security Council as a bunch of self-important fools shouting over each other ad infinitum to little purpose, and the final joke of the film doubles down on that in the most glorious way. Batman has a surprising amount of topical humour about politics and international relations, and while none of it could be called incisive or biting, it obviously wasn't supposed to be. High camp is high camp, this is a comedy in which everyone is a target, but no one is hurt.

Maybe even “comedy” is not an all-encompassing descriptor here. The dialogue might at times be more towards the nonsense of Edward Lear, which is not outwardly “funny” but rather “silly” in an endearing way. The performances, however, show a clear comic/straightman dynamic. Batman and Robin are broadly speaking straightmen, no pun intended, foils to the villains who are constantly goofing around and hamming it up. Adam West's totally serious, news-anchor-esque delivery in the face of exploding sharks, bad Russian accents, Frank Gorshin's bulge, Burgess Meredith's waark-waark-waarking, not to mention Burt Ward's exclamatory puns and other assorted insanities, provides much balance, and is made all the stronger in its balancing by the ridiculousness of the Batman costume itself. For people who know the original TV series, this will hardly come as a surprise, and on that front it's pretty much business as usual, but unlike most TV shows making the transition to feature film, here's one that didn't sacrifice all the things that made it good in order to be “cinematic”.
   
When thinking of classic Batman villains, I at least would be hard pressed to come up with a more iconic group than Penguin, Catwoman, Riddler, and Joker. They aren't necessarily those characters as you know them from more recent films, but they are delightful to watch as they prance, dance, slither, and waddle around with exaggerated bravura. Burgess Meredith growls and squawks, equal parts bird and sinister businessman, a cigarette holder dangling permanently from snarling lips as he pumps green knockout gas from an umbrella. Catwoman plays both seductive and silly, and is perhaps the funniest of the four, because she is at once the most outwardly normal and the most insane. Lee Meriwether only played the role this one time, but she did it brilliantly. Frank Gorshin's Riddler, bulge aside, seems at times like some kind of proto-Kramer; the way he delivers his monologue as he plots how to defeat Batman once and for all (this involves catapulting Batman into an exploding octopus) reminded me so much of Kramer in episode 78 of Seinfeld, “The Marine Biologist”, when he talks about his plans to go out to the beach and hit golf balls into the ocean.
   
Last, and perhaps even least, Cesar Romero's Joker has surprisingly little to do. I think this is mainly a temporal thing. My history might be wrong, but since Alan Moore's one-shot The Killing Joke was blown out of all proportion it seems that we've come to think of the Joker as Costello to Batman's Abbott, an inseparable duo, diametrically opposed, who, underneath it all, might be more similar than they think. It's a classic set-up, and it's easy to see why it's so popular—well, maybe it won't be any longer thanks to Jared Leto's er... questionable interpretation—but I wonder if back in the golden or silver age this wasn't a bit less the case. Knowing his performances for the TV series, maybe he doesn't need to be so prominent anyway, simply because let loose he could well overshadow the others. He's also a lot more fun than some of the more recent interpretations, even just seeing his well-trimmed moustache peeking through his make-up is funny.
   
Adding to performance and plot, Nelson Riddle's score carries the action on a sonic bed of surf rock, lounge jazz, surf rock, orchestral swoons, and more surf rock. From the very beginning the music helps bring you into the film's heightened camp version of the mid-'60s and underlines with knowing winks the silliness of the script and the performances it calls for. Taken all together, it's a really fun film. It knows it's silly, and it revels in it. I'm not sure I would call great comedy, but it's a very entertaining piece—certainly more so than Batman's two most recent outings, by turns ludicrous, dire, insulting, and bland—and a great place to commence my adventure through the Bat Annals of Bat History. That does it for this edition of the Batshit Odyssey. Tune in next week, same Bat Time, same Bat Channel, when we'll check in with 1989's Batman.

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Offline honk

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Re: Just Watched
« Reply #1899 on: April 28, 2018, 05:07:40 AM »
In fact, Batman's awkward relationship with the police is nowhere to be seen here, as he and Robin are officially recognised and deputised.

In one episode, Gordon comments that he gave up trying to find out who Batman was a long time ago. The idea of these versions of Batman and Gordon ever having a more tense relationship is both intriguing and hilarious.

Quote
I think this is mainly a temporal thing. My history might be wrong, but since Alan Moore's one-shot The Killing Joke was blown out of all proportion it seems that we've come to think of the Joker as Costello to Batman's Abbott, an inseparable duo, diametrically opposed, who, underneath it all, might be more similar than they think. It's a classic set-up, and it's easy to see why it's so popular—well, maybe it won't be any longer thanks to Jared Leto's er... questionable interpretation—but I wonder if back in the golden or silver age this wasn't a bit less the case.

Having plunged deeply into the archives of Batman history, I can confirm that it wasn't until about the seventies, when comics were allowed to get edgier and more violent, that the Joker began to be seen as Batman's arch-enemy.
ur retartet but u donut even no it and i walnut tell u y