I've been a Flat Earther since birth, but one thing started to puzzle me when I went on long trips.  Whenever I travel hundreds and sometimes even thousands of miles closer to the ice wall in a direction some uninformed people call 'South,' the weather gets warmer.  Shouldn't it get colder the nearer we get to the giant ice wall?  Every so called 'winter,' it gets colder where I live in Washington State.  So  I heard some old codgers claim that it would be warmer 'down South.'  I had my doubts, but I tried it out.  I drove all the way to Baja, Mexico and sure enough it was much warmer.  It was also much closer to the great ice wall.  This completely stupefies me, so I want one of you experts to 'splain it to me.
Thanks in advance.
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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2017, 06:48:42 PM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).  Consider an analogy: you are in your house in the winter, walking toward the window.  It's cold outside that window, you are getting closer to the cold.  However if the heat register is right under that window, you will get warmer instead of colder.

The round earth offers a better explanation for your experience.  Both north of the equator and south of the equator, sunlight falls at more shallow angles through more miles of atmosphere, and thus provides less heating to the surface, thus making things colder the farther from the equator you go in either direction.
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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 03:58:27 PM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).
:)  That made me laugh.  Thanks.  Since the Earth is flat and only about 25,000 miles across, and the Sun is 93 million miles away the difference from any place on Earth to the sun is negligible, the angle being so tiny.  So 50% is WAY off.  As a percentage it would be closer to .00000000001%.  I hope your facility with math is not representative of all Rounders.

BUT, you did chance on something that gives me a potential solution to the problem I posed.  Indeed, I did not travel far enough 'South.'  You see, there also is, at the very center of the Earth, an enormous mass of ice and frigid dirt called the Arctic. So, as I traveled away from that ice mass I got warmer.  At the halfway point, what YOU call the 'equator,' I expect I would start to get colder as I approached the Ice Wall. 

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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 05:46:01 PM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).
:)  That made me laugh.  Thanks.  Since the Earth is flat and only about 25,000 miles across, and the Sun is 93 million miles away the difference from any place on Earth to the sun is negligible, the angle being so tiny.  So 50% is WAY off.  As a percentage it would be closer to .00000000001%.  I hope your facility with math is not representative of all Rounders.

BUT, you did chance on something that gives me a potential solution to the problem I posed.  Indeed, I did not travel far enough 'South.'  You see, there also is, at the very center of the Earth, an enormous mass of ice and frigid dirt called the Arctic. So, as I traveled away from that ice mass I got warmer.  At the halfway point, what YOU call the 'equator,' I expect I would start to get colder as I approached the Ice Wall.

Oh!  You're one of *THAT* kind of flat-earther.   Most people here believe that the Sun hovers only 3,000 miles above the surface of the flat earth, and that it's about 30 miles across.

You say it's 93 million miles away - just like the round-earthers do.

That's a new variation on FE theory...not what the FE'ers here believe at all.

So how do YOU explain sunsets and sunrises?   Does the flat earth rotate or does the sun orbit around it or something?   If so, then how do you explain that it can be noon in (say) Texas (where I live) and 6pm in the UK (where my mother lives).   I call her often and her time zone is 6 hours away from mine.   If the earth is flat and the sun is setting for her - how come it's not setting for me too?

I think there are some severe problems with your version of the Flat Earth...it's even more unlikely than the "official" explanations given here.


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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 06:42:31 PM »
Oh!  You're one of *THAT* kind of flat-earther.   Most people here believe that the Sun hovers only 3,000 miles above the surface of the flat earth, and that it's about 30 miles across.
You say it's 93 million miles away - just like the round-earthers do.
That's a new variation on FE theory...not what the FE'ers here believe at all.
I didn't know *THAT* kind of flat-earther even existed.  Havin the sun at 93 million miles above a flat earth is even more ridiculous than having it only 3000 miles above one.  Neither one can explain sunrise/sunset, and that's just for starters.
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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2017, 08:02:59 PM »
Oh!  You're one of *THAT* kind of flat-earther.   Most people here believe that the Sun hovers only 3,000 miles above the surface of the flat earth, and that it's about 30 miles across.
You say it's 93 million miles away - just like the round-earthers do.
That's a new variation on FE theory...not what the FE'ers here believe at all.
I didn't know *THAT* kind of flat-earther even existed.  Havin the sun at 93 million miles above a flat earth is even more ridiculous than having it only 3000 miles above one.  Neither one can explain sunrise/sunset, and that's just for starters.

It's probable that this person believes that the Sun orbits over and below the Flat Earth...which does produce sunrises and sunsets - but to all points on the Earth simultaneously...which isn't exactly what we really see! 

With *THAT* kind of flat-earth theory, a lot of things (like the motion or moon, stars and planets) work "naturally" - but only for one place on the Earth - everywhere else, the lack of "time zones" becomes problematic.

It's mind-boggling just how many variations of FE theory there are.   This is likely to be a consequence of a lack of "The Scientific Method".


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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2017, 04:01:08 AM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).
:)  That made me laugh.  Thanks.  Since the Earth is flat and only about 25,000 miles across, and the Sun is 93 million miles away the difference from any place on Earth to the sun is negligible, the angle being so tiny.  So 50% is WAY off.  As a percentage it would be closer to .00000000001%.  I hope your facility with math is not representative of all Rounders.

BUT, you did chance on something that gives me a potential solution to the problem I posed.  Indeed, I did not travel far enough 'South.'  You see, there also is, at the very center of the Earth, an enormous mass of ice and frigid dirt called the Arctic. So, as I traveled away from that ice mass I got warmer.  At the halfway point, what YOU call the 'equator,' I expect I would start to get colder as I approached the Ice Wall.

It's because the sun is always above the Equator or not far from it. And it's 3000 miles above the Earth, not 93 million. Temperature is based on distance from the sun, not distance from the edge; the reason there's ice around the Earth and in its center is that these are the parts of the Earth farthest from the sun. I'm sure you thought you were being clever, but your question seems to be based on the mistaken assumption that it's distance from the edge that determines temperature, which is not something you read here (I have no idea where you got that from), so I hope this clarifies things for you.
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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2017, 12:11:31 PM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).
:)  That made me laugh.  Thanks.  Since the Earth is flat and only about 25,000 miles across, and the Sun is 93 million miles away the difference from any place on Earth to the sun is negligible, the angle being so tiny.  So 50% is WAY off.  As a percentage it would be closer to .00000000001%.  I hope your facility with math is not representative of all Rounders.

BUT, you did chance on something that gives me a potential solution to the problem I posed.  Indeed, I did not travel far enough 'South.'  You see, there also is, at the very center of the Earth, an enormous mass of ice and frigid dirt called the Arctic. So, as I traveled away from that ice mass I got warmer.  At the halfway point, what YOU call the 'equator,' I expect I would start to get colder as I approached the Ice Wall.

It's because the sun is always above the Equator or not far from it. And it's 3000 miles above the Earth, not 93 million. Temperature is based on distance from the sun, not distance from the edge; the reason there's ice around the Earth and in its center is that these are the parts of the Earth farthest from the sun. I'm sure you thought you were being clever, but your question seems to be based on the mistaken assumption that it's distance from the edge that determines temperature, which is not something you read here (I have no idea where you got that from), so I hope this clarifies things for you.

Except that doesn't work. The equator is equal distance between the north and south pole. (i.e. the top and bottom of the planet) Assuming a round, flat planet like all of the material I have seen, this would leave far more area below the equator than above it. The southern hemisphere would be much colder as it would receive a smaller amount of energy per sq mile than the northern hemisphere.

Let's suppose you have a circle of with a radius of 10 miles. Now, create a second circle with half the radius, 5 sq miles. This circle represents the northern hemisphere. The total area is 314 sq miles. The area of the northern hemisphere is only 78 sq miles. Do a little subtraction, and the area of your southern hemisphere is 236 sq miles.

You could also say that this explains the ice wall (which only some of you think exists), but then you run into the problem of the southern hemisphere being mostly covered in ice. Australia begs to differ.

You could also say that the orbit of the sun is larger to compensate for your temperature problem, but then you run into the problem of the sun never rising very high at northern latitudes and being very high at southern latitudes.

And for the coupe de grace, the Sun in the southern hemisphere would have to cross the sky MUCH more rapidly than in the north as it has to cover much more ground.

The Zetetic method is CLEARLY not being used in regards to flat Earth.
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Re: Why does the weather seem warmer when I travel toward the ice wall?
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2017, 01:11:04 PM »
Your experience has not encompassed enough of the earth to provide enough information.  If the earth is flat, a drive from Washington to Baja gets you, what, 30% closer to the ice wall?  At the same time, it gets you 50% closer to the sun (if not more than 50%).
:)  That made me laugh.  Thanks.  Since the Earth is flat and only about 25,000 miles across, and the Sun is 93 million miles away the difference from any place on Earth to the sun is negligible, the angle being so tiny.  So 50% is WAY off.  As a percentage it would be closer to .00000000001%.  I hope your facility with math is not representative of all Rounders.

BUT, you did chance on something that gives me a potential solution to the problem I posed.  Indeed, I did not travel far enough 'South.'  You see, there also is, at the very center of the Earth, an enormous mass of ice and frigid dirt called the Arctic. So, as I traveled away from that ice mass I got warmer.  At the halfway point, what YOU call the 'equator,' I expect I would start to get colder as I approached the Ice Wall.

It's because the sun is always above the Equator or not far from it. And it's 3000 miles above the Earth, not 93 million. Temperature is based on distance from the sun, not distance from the edge; the reason there's ice around the Earth and in its center is that these are the parts of the Earth farthest from the sun. I'm sure you thought you were being clever, but your question seems to be based on the mistaken assumption that it's distance from the edge that determines temperature, which is not something you read here (I have no idea where you got that from), so I hope this clarifies things for you.

Except that doesn't work. The equator is equal distance between the north and south pole. (i.e. the top and bottom of the planet) Assuming a round, flat planet like all of the material I have seen, this would leave far more area below the equator than above it. The southern hemisphere would be much colder as it would receive a smaller amount of energy per sq mile than the northern hemisphere.

Let's suppose you have a circle of with a radius of 10 miles. Now, create a second circle with half the radius, 5 sq miles. This circle represents the northern hemisphere. The total area is 314 sq miles. The area of the northern hemisphere is only 78 sq miles. Do a little subtraction, and the area of your southern hemisphere is 236 sq miles.

You could also say that this explains the ice wall (which only some of you think exists), but then you run into the problem of the southern hemisphere being mostly covered in ice. Australia begs to differ.

You could also say that the orbit of the sun is larger to compensate for your temperature problem, but then you run into the problem of the sun never rising very high at northern latitudes and being very high at southern latitudes.

And for the coupe de grace, the Sun in the southern hemisphere would have to cross the sky MUCH more rapidly than in the north as it has to cover much more ground.

The Zetetic method is CLEARLY not being used in regards to flat Earth.

Oh - WOW!  That's a very clever disproof!   I'm going to elevate this to it's own thread.

     https://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=6919.0
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 01:43:45 PM by 3DGeek »