Offline UnionsOfSolarSystemPlanet

  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • The Moon orbits spherical Earth!
    • View Profile
So if we give ground photos of satellites, flat Earthers responses will be:
"It's a speck of light, how does that supposed to prove a spaceship circling the Earth?".
Well then, what the heck is that speck of light supposed to be?
And why does it's movement matches with websites tracking satellites?
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 04:36:05 PM by UnionsOfSolarSystemPlanet »
The size of the Solar system if the Moon were only 1 pixel:
http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

*

Offline BlueMoon

  • *
  • Posts: 127
  • NASA Defender
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 04:38:22 PM »
So if we give ground photos of satellites, flat Earthers responses will be:
"It's a speck of light, how does that supposed to prove a spaceship circling the Earth?".
Well then, what the heck is that speck of light supposed to be?
And why does it's movement matches with websites tracking satellites?
You may want to see my earlier topic "Why do satellites follow elliptical paths?"
Aerospace Engineering Student
NASA Enthusiast
Round Earth Advocate
More qualified to speak for NASA than you are to speak against them


*

Offline rabinoz

  • *
  • Posts: 1436
  • Just look South at the Stars
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 11:10:26 PM »
https://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+satellites+from+earth&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSksDlu_XLAhXB7CYKHbk-DIEQ_AUIBygB&biw=1536&bih=754

Oh yeah, tons of people uploading their personal photos of these specks of light aren't they.
And you don't have the slightest curiosity as to what these specks of light  might be? The way to find out the TRUTH is to question these things and find out just what they are.

Figuring out where satellite dishes are pointed will give evidence of space travel.  The dishes are directional antennas that are pointing towards a satellite in geostationary orbit, so were are told.  It is not that complicated to figure out where two or more dishes receiving a signal from the same satellite are pointed.  Where the imaginary lines intersect or get close to intersecting(if you are not too meticulous gathering the data) is evidence where the signal is coming from.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
You can take long exposures of the night sky where geostationary satellites are said to be.
As shown on the right ->
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMHO if the search for truth is TFES objective they really do not seem to be trying too hard to seek out that truth.  My guess one reason not doing two or more of the above is that it will offer evidence that space travel happens, those pictures from space agencies are real and that is damning evidence against the Earth being flat.

In the photograph (not an amateur one) anyone with any curiosity and knowledge on astronomy might wonder why there are the long streaks of various colours and brightnesses and just 3 tiny points of light labelled "Sat Mex 5", "ANIK F3" and "ECHOSTAR 7" (and one meteor!).


FEers just don't have the curiosity to question the significance of the little stationary "lights in the sky" amid the streaks of the star trails.
Most Flat Earthers seem to have this sort of reaction:
Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about it.  I mean after all, they're just lights in the sky.  How much can we expect to ever know about them? 
Not even the slightest trace of curiosity, no desire to learn anything.

Just in case you might be more curious. The telescope is stationary and the streaks (apart from the meteor trail) are from stars appearing to move due to the earth's rotation. The 3 tiny stationary dots are the images of 3 geostationary satellites orbiting at exactly the same angular velocity as the earth, hence they appear stationary.

I would say that a person is indoctrinated when they are not prepared to question their beliefs and evaluate all available evidence. From what I have seen on this site this applies to almost all Flat Earthers.

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2016, 01:34:54 AM »
You obviously didn't even click the link rabinoz. It's all that terrible cgi of the thousands of satellites swarming the earth, you know the ones not visible from the international space station, or visible from the DISCOVR satellite "photograph" of Earth. I don't see a single photograph that is referencing any single satellite from earth in that Google search result.

*

Offline rabinoz

  • *
  • Posts: 1436
  • Just look South at the Stars
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2016, 04:14:25 AM »
You obviously didn't even click the link rabinoz. It's all that terrible cgi of the thousands of satellites swarming the earth, you know the ones not visible from the international space station, or visible from the DISCOVR satellite "photograph" of Earth. I don't see a single photograph that is referencing any single satellite from earth in that Google search result.
OK, which of those images are claimed to be photographs. No-one claims that the images showing thousands of satellites are photographs! Don't be utterly ridiculous.

On a photo showing the whole earth those satellites would be a tiny fraction of a pixel in size!
Most satellites are well under 10 m across (the ISS is much bigger) so from a range of even 100 km they would completely invisible.
The DISCOVR satellite is about 1,000,000 miles away and you are complaining that you can't see a 30 ft satellite!

Look, just think for yourself a bit sometimes and stop being so completely biased.
Do a little working out for yourself. Would you expect to pick out say a person in a photo taken 20 km away!

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2016, 05:43:12 AM »
You obviously didn't even click the link rabinoz. It's all that terrible cgi of the thousands of satellites swarming the earth, you know the ones not visible from the international space station, or visible from the DISCOVR satellite "photograph" of Earth. I don't see a single photograph that is referencing any single satellite from earth in that Google search result.
OK, which of those images are claimed to be photographs. No-one claims that the images showing thousands of satellites are photographs! Don't be utterly ridiculous.

On a photo showing the whole earth those satellites would be a tiny fraction of a pixel in size!
Most satellites are well under 10 m across (the ISS is much bigger) so from a range of even 100 km they would completely invisible.
The DISCOVR satellite is about 1,000,000 miles away and you are complaining that you can't see a 30 ft satellite!

Look, just think for yourself a bit sometimes and stop being so completely biased.
Do a little working out for yourself. Would you expect to pick out say a person in a photo taken 20 km away!

You completely gloss over the lack of a single satellite seen from aboard the ISS. There's also no actual photos of a satellite, just phony cgi, and of course I didn't think that graphic of the 20k satellites was photo that's why I called it horrible cgi. I'm a graphic artist by trade, I guess it's more obvious to me what is fake and what is real. I can hardly watch most modern movies because the obvious cgi kills it for me.

*

Offline Venus

  • *
  • Posts: 113
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2016, 06:36:56 AM »
You obviously didn't even click the link rabinoz. It's all that terrible cgi of the thousands of satellites swarming the earth, you know the ones not visible from the international space station, or visible from the DISCOVR satellite "photograph" of Earth. I don't see a single photograph that is referencing any single satellite from earth in that Google search result.

Why don't you buy yourself a telescope and USE it !!
It always amazes me that FE'ers who have never owned a telescope and spend virtually every night glued to their computer screen think they know more about the night sky than real Astronomers who spend thousands of hours each year using incredibly powerful telescopes to observe the night sky ...  and all of the amateur astronomers around the world that spend many hours viewing the night sky through a telescope !!
Because I live on the 'bottom' of a spinning spherical earth ...
*I cannot see Polaris, but I can see the Southern Cross
*When I look at the stars they appear to rotate clockwise, not anti-clockwise
*I see the moon 'upside down'
I've travelled to the Northern Hemisphere numerous times ... and seen how different the stars and the moon are 'up' there!
Come on down and check it out FE believers... !!

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2016, 06:36:57 AM »
You obviously didn't even click the link rabinoz. It's all that terrible cgi of the thousands of satellites swarming the earth, you know the ones not visible from the international space station, or visible from the DISCOVR satellite "photograph" of Earth. I don't see a single photograph that is referencing any single satellite from earth in that Google search result.
OK, which of those images are claimed to be photographs. No-one claims that the images showing thousands of satellites are photographs! Don't be utterly ridiculous.

On a photo showing the whole earth those satellites would be a tiny fraction of a pixel in size!
Most satellites are well under 10 m across (the ISS is much bigger) so from a range of even 100 km they would completely invisible.
The DISCOVR satellite is about 1,000,000 miles away and you are complaining that you can't see a 30 ft satellite!

Look, just think for yourself a bit sometimes and stop being so completely biased.
Do a little working out for yourself. Would you expect to pick out say a person in a photo taken 20 km away!

You completely gloss over the lack of a single satellite seen from aboard the ISS. There's also no actual photos of a satellite, just phony cgi, and of course I didn't think that graphic of the 20k satellites was photo that's why I called it horrible cgi. I'm a graphic artist by trade, I guess it's more obvious to me what is fake and what is real. I can hardly watch most modern movies because the obvious cgi kills it for me.
Answer this then: WHY would you expect a satellite to be visible from ISS, let alone on a photo taken from ISS?
Ignored by Intikam since 2016.

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2016, 11:30:05 AM »
You completely gloss over the lack of a single satellite seen from aboard the ISS. There's also no actual photos of a satellite, just phony cgi, and of course I didn't think that graphic of the 20k satellites was photo that's why I called it horrible cgi. I'm a graphic artist by trade, I guess it's more obvious to me what is fake and what is real. I can hardly watch most modern movies because the obvious cgi kills it for me.

Satellites from Earth (private source): http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/celestial-objects-to-watch/observing-iridium-flares/

Here's a photo of a satellite from space: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01294/satellite_1294450c.jpg

There are a few more, though for obvious reasons they usually capture the satellite as it is released.

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2016, 03:17:35 PM »

Here's a photo of a satellite from space: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01294/satellite_1294450c.jpg

There are a few more, though for obvious reasons they usually capture the satellite as it is released.

What leads you to believe that photograph is even genuine?

What about all these ones? The artists went to great length to make them. Some are even purported as real. Obviously it's a great undertaking to photograph an object moving over 16,000 mph with a camera also moving 16,000 mph, so I understand the need to fake these graphics. But the problem is, people with less critical sets of eyes look at them and actually believe them to be real, without thinking about the technical difficulty of taking such a photograph, or without noticing the cartoonish features of the graphics. It's propaganda. So other than the flares supposedly caused by that one type of satellite, and ISS high altitude pass overs, what other proof do we have satellites exist the way we're told they do?

*

Offline BlueMoon

  • *
  • Posts: 127
  • NASA Defender
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2016, 04:37:03 PM »

Here's a photo of a satellite from space: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01294/satellite_1294450c.jpg

There are a few more, though for obvious reasons they usually capture the satellite as it is released.

What leads you to believe that photograph is even genuine?

What about all these ones? The artists went to great length to make them. Some are even purported as real. Obviously it's a great undertaking to photograph an object moving over 16,000 mph with a camera also moving 16,000 mph, so I understand the need to fake these graphics. But the problem is, people with less critical sets of eyes look at them and actually believe them to be real, without thinking about the technical difficulty of taking such a photograph, or without noticing the cartoonish features of the graphics. It's propaganda. So other than the flares supposedly caused by that one type of satellite, and ISS high altitude pass overs, what other proof do we have satellites exist the way we're told they do?


You can tell which ones are real, and which ones are artists' impressions.  It's pretty obvious for the most part.  But the only viable way to get an image of another satellite like that is during rendezvous or shortly after release. 
I've said elsewhere that satellites are easily trackable, and that they take a very large amount of effort and funding to launch.  Satellite owners are significantly invested, and they'd suspect if something was up, especially if things went wrong that made no sense. 
Plus, what else could satellites be? 
Aerospace Engineering Student
NASA Enthusiast
Round Earth Advocate
More qualified to speak for NASA than you are to speak against them

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2016, 04:54:28 PM »

Here's a photo of a satellite from space: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01294/satellite_1294450c.jpg

There are a few more, though for obvious reasons they usually capture the satellite as it is released.

What leads you to believe that photograph is even genuine?

What reason is there to think it's not genuine?

What about all these ones? The artists went to great length to make them. Some are even purported as real.

Some of them are real. Do you have any specific examples of images that are claimed to be real but you believe are not?

What do you think of this one, for instance?

Obviously it's a great undertaking to photograph an object moving over 16,000 mph with a camera also moving 16,000 mph, so I understand the need to fake these graphics. But the problem is, people with less critical sets of eyes look at them and actually believe them to be real, without thinking about the technical difficulty of taking such a photograph, or without noticing the cartoonish features of the graphics.

I'm not sure why the orbital speeds would be problematic if the relative speed of photographer and photographed object was quite small.

It's propaganda. So other than the flares supposedly caused by that one type of satellite, and ISS high altitude pass overs, what other proof do we have satellites exist the way we're told they do?

What further proof do you feel you need?

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2016, 05:50:37 PM »
What leads you to believe that photograph is even genuine?

It has none of the signs my mind associates with computer generated images, and the shot looks plausible.

But the problem is, people with less critical sets of eyes look at them and actually believe them to be real, without thinking about the technical difficulty of taking such a photograph, or without noticing the cartoonish features of the graphics. It's propaganda.

The term "propaganda" implies that there is an intent to deceive. Just the fact that something can be misinterpreted doesn't make it propaganda according to the way the term is commonly used (and I say this specifically without even looking up a definition, because quoting definitions isn't an argument).

So other than the flares supposedly caused by that one type of satellite, and ISS high altitude pass overs, what other proof do we have satellites exist the way we're told they do?

For one, the fact that we are told by a significant number of people is evidence. Additionally, the fact that all our satellite based devices, like satellite dishes or GPS just happen to work the way one would expect of satellite based devices makes it more probable that we do in fact live in a world with satellites. The same goes for the fact that no-one has convincingly exposed the bluff, as it is possible to triangulate satellites, for example GPS satellites which actually broadcast their position to your device.

*

Offline rabinoz

  • *
  • Posts: 1436
  • Just look South at the Stars
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2016, 06:34:10 AM »

Here's a photo of a satellite from space: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01294/satellite_1294450c.jpg

There are a few more, though for obvious reasons they usually capture the satellite as it is released.

What leads you to believe that photograph is even genuine?

What about all these ones? The artists went to great length to make them. Some are even purported as real. Obviously it's a great undertaking to photograph an object moving over 16,000 mph with a camera also moving 16,000 mph, so I understand the need to fake these graphics. But the problem is, people with less critical sets of eyes look at them and actually believe them to be real, without thinking about the technical difficulty of taking such a photograph, or without noticing the cartoonish features of the graphics. It's propaganda. So other than the flares supposedly caused by that one type of satellite, and ISS high altitude pass overs, what other proof do we have satellites exist the way we're told they do?
Just look where the image comes from, it's not usually Rocket Science!

Artist's conception of GPS Block II-F satellite in Earth orbit.
From: wiki Global Positioning System
xxxxxx
Bit of a clue in the "will comprise"!
Quote
The MTG series will comprise four imaging and two sounding satellites.
From: esc aerospace
xxxxxx
This one does not specifically say it is a representation, but I think common sense would indicate that it was not a photograph!
From: Satellite Evolution

Most photographs and diagrams are put there for general information and the Space Agencies see any need to "prove themselves" in you eyes or anyone else's eyes! If you want to doubt everything you see that's completely up to you. Don't expect everyone to pander to your scepticism.

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2016, 02:36:48 PM »
https://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+satellites+from+earth&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSksDlu_XLAhXB7CYKHbk-DIEQ_AUIBygB&biw=1536&bih=754

Oh yeah, tons of people uploading their personal photos of these specks of light aren't they.
And you don't have the slightest curiosity as to what these specks of light  might be?
No. 
Pics or it did not happen.  GoPro cameras are cheap! 

The way to find out the TRUTH is to question these things and find out just what they are.
I would be curious if the satellite-makers put a GoPro camera ---- even with a fish-eye lens --- on their "satellites" and showed us a live-stream of their travels.  That would be cool! 
Heck, I am sure these "satellite" companies could make a lot of money selling GoogeAds with their transmission...... oh, wait!  Maybe the GoogleEarthMan might have a problem...... 
watch?v=xhcVJcINzn8

*

Offline rabinoz

  • *
  • Posts: 1436
  • Just look South at the Stars
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2016, 08:49:34 AM »
https://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+satellites+from+earth&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSksDlu_XLAhXB7CYKHbk-DIEQ_AUIBygB&biw=1536&bih=754

Oh yeah, tons of people uploading their personal photos of these specks of light aren't they.
And you don't have the slightest curiosity as to what these specks of light  might be?
No. 
Pics or it did not happen.  GoPro cameras are cheap! 

The way to find out the TRUTH is to question these things and find out just what they are.
I would be curious if the satellite-makers put a GoPro camera ---- even with a fish-eye lens --- on their "satellites" and showed us a live-stream of their travels.  That would be cool! 
Heck, I am sure these "satellite" companies could make a lot of money selling GoogeAds with their transmission...... oh, wait!  Maybe the GoogleEarthMan might have a problem......
You did look at the pictures TheTruthIsOnHere referenced? They are certainly not of " tons of people uploading their personal photos of these specks of light" as he seems to hint! As far as I can see most are just "artist's impressions", and say so!

So, I really don't know what on earth you are talking about! And, I doubt the you know either.

*

Offline Jura-Glenlivet

  • *
  • Posts: 1486
  • Life is meaningless & everything dies.
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2016, 11:21:03 AM »

Just had a quick look on the Go-pro site and although they seem pretty tough it doesn't seem to be designed with vacuum or almost absolute zero temperature rated, however what would be the point, the ISS has an almost constant stream and that is dismissed as CGI/fake/devils work.

I have tried before, showing the satellite tracking sites so they can check for themselves, even suggested they (god forbid) go and look for themselves, they could do it before they check the sites just to make sure that by viewing you don't trigger the vast NASA network to throw something up, but actually physically doing something other than typing furiously seems an anathema. 
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2016, 01:32:45 PM »
You did look at the pictures TheTruthIsOnHere referenced? They are certainly not of " tons of people uploading their personal photos of these specks of light" as he seems to hint! As far as I can see most are just "artist's impressions", and say so!

So, I really don't know what on earth you are talking about! And, I doubt the you know either.

It was sarcasm. I was taking something you obviously consider to be some kind of widespread phenomenon of people locating, looking at, and photographic specks of light, and showing that it isn't nearly as common as you think. I'm sure I could go to satellite watching specific forums, that have about 6 active members to learn more about these specks of light, but an overwhelming majority of people just take it for granted that they exist and can be seen.

That's the kind of blind trust I can't fathom. Most people are just willing to accept whatever is told to them without doing the research or having the first hand experience to verify it. Not that I haven't been guilty of that in the past.

It's kind of like... let me phrase this analogy right: It's kind of like being in one of your first major relationships, and finding out your partner has been unfaithful. Does that automatically mean that your next partner will do the same? No. But it does mean you will use an abundance of caution and be more critical of the cues of your new partner. You could also have a new level of distrust, depending how hard you believed and were committed and then crushed by the previous relationship. Whether or not every partner you have from then on will cheat on you isn't certain, but you could never take for granted a persons commitment the same again.

That's how I look at a lot of mainstream information that is disseminated. I want to trust it. I would love to live in a world where no one ever lied to me. I would love to be able to trust fully that those who have their own agenda, motivations, and biases would somehow always have the greater good in mind. But once you discover a major lie it's easier go down the rabbit hole and find many other inconsistencies from that point forward. It's a gift and a curse, really.

« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 08:11:42 PM by TheTruthIsOnHere »

*

Offline Rounder

  • *
  • Posts: 779
  • What in the Sam Hill are you people talking about?
    • View Profile
Re: What is that speck of light we spherical Earthlings call satellites?
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2016, 03:06:46 PM »
I would be curious if the satellite-makers put a GoPro camera ---- even with a fish-eye lens --- on their "satellites" and showed us a live-stream of their travels.  That would be cool!

It's been done (not with GoPro, of course), it's been pointed out here, and it's been dismissed as fake.  But what the heck, I guess I'll put links up AGAIN for people to reject AGAIN anyway:

Live feed from the ISS.  Half the time the feed is dark, because the ISS spends half of each 90 minute orbit in the earth's shadow (AKA "night").  Give it 45 minutes or less, there will be imagery.

Daily montage of still frames from the DSCOVR satellite parked at Earth-Sun L1 point.

Short montages of visible and infrared still frames from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system.  (AKA "weather satellites")

Daily composite of images taken by the polar-orbiting Aqua and Terra satellites.  The images making up the composite are stripes following the polar orbit, with gaps between the sections as the camera is over the equator (the field of view isn't wide enough to overlap there) and a bright band down the middle of each stripe as the sun reflects off the ocean and clouds.

The latest still images from Landsat 8, tiled together and identified with how long ago each was taken.  No individual frame is older than 32 days.  There are gaps in the composite.

I really don't know why I bothered.
Proud member of ─░ntikam's "Ignore List"
Ok. You proven you are unworthy to unignored. You proven it was a bad idea to unignore you. and it was for me a disgusting experience...Now you are going to place where you deserved and accustomed.
Quote from: SexWarrior
You accuse {FE} people of malice where incompetence suffice