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Offline jroa

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2016, 12:35:09 AM »
I saw a little light fly across the sky the other night.  That is proof that the Earth is round, lol. 

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Offline Luke 22:35-38

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2016, 11:12:10 PM »
I saw a little light fly across the sky the other night.  That is proof that the Earth is round, lol.

Get a pair of binoculars as the thread title suggests.
Isaiah 40:22 "It is he that sitteth upon the CIRCLE of the earth"

Scripture, science, facts, stats, and logic is how I argue

Evolutionism is a religion. Can dumb luck create a smart brain?

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2016, 07:29:32 AM »
I saw a little light fly across the sky the other night.  That is proof that the Earth is round, lol.
Nah, that's Papa's Citation.

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2017, 01:43:46 PM »
The ISS is a satellite, as there are other satellites, too.

That being said, do people actually live in that thing? No way. It's a complicated tin can circling above the earth, not exactly a home.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2017, 12:56:03 AM »
The ISS is a satellite, as there are other satellites, too.

That being said, do people actually live in that thing? No way. It's a complicated tin can circling above the earth, not exactly a home.
Please give some evidence. The words of a rabbit, elusive of otherwise, mean nothing!

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2017, 02:31:45 AM »
The ISS is a satellite, as there are other satellites, too.
Please give some evidence.
You and I, a round earther and a flat earther, are on more-or-less the same page for once... and you're still asking me for evidence?  ::)

Anyway, regarding this point of mine:

That being said, do people actually live in that thing? No way. It's a complicated tin can circling above the earth, not exactly a home.
People don't live in satellites.


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Offline Boots

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2017, 02:46:20 AM »
Anyway, regarding this point of mine:

That being said, do people actually live in that thing? No way. It's a complicated tin can circling above the earth, not exactly a home.
People don't live in satellites.

Your first assertion seemed lacking in evidence but "People don't live in satellites" really backs it up.
Where the senses fail us, reason must step in. - Galileo Galilei

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2017, 07:35:49 AM »
Anyway, regarding this point of mine:

That being said, do people actually live in that thing? No way. It's a complicated tin can circling above the earth, not exactly a home.
People don't live in satellites.

Your first assertion seemed lacking in evidence but "People don't live in satellites"  :P :P really backs it up.  :P :P
I hope I improved it!
Evidence? Hard-to-find Bugs Bunny calls that evidence?

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2017, 12:03:42 PM »
Evidence? Hard-to-find Bugs Bunny calls that evidence?

I chuckled. Now, I want you guys to think about this one-- something I know can be really difficult, but I want you to give it a shot.   ;)

Think about where people live. Homes, huts, bungalows, RVs, trailers, apartments, motels, condos, hotels, and the list goes on and on. What do these places all have in common? They: a) are located on the ground, which is where we live. b) serve genuine functions, such as providing running water and heating or, simply, protection from the elements. c) are located near other shelters and places of residence, oftentimes. d) are located near resources such as fresh water supplies, lots of food, etc.

People don't live in planes, hot air balloons, jets, helicopters, gliders, or anything like that. Why? Because they: a) are located in the air, which we can't continuously live in. b) will be much more difficult, if not impossible, to serve genuine functions and provide protection from the elements (over longer periods of time, a few hours on a flight is fine). c) are isolated forms of "shelter", meaning you won't have any neighbors or community. d) are isolated from important resources such as food and water. Plus, you have to land and re-fuel at some point, and somebody has to keep an eye on the controls, and so much more.

So, taking this all into consideration, do you find a tin can circling above the earth-- supposedly permanently-- flying around all by its lonesome, with no close proximity to any form of resources (whether human or food or whatever) and an extremely questionable, highly unlikely ability to provide functions and shelter, a suitable place for anybody to live? Furthermore, do you find my assertion that people don't live there more crazy than your guys' assertion that people do live there?


Offline Flatout

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2017, 02:15:04 AM »
I'm sure they are faking it.


Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #30 on: January 27, 2017, 02:51:57 PM »
Evidence? Hard-to-find Bugs Bunny calls that evidence?

I chuckled. Now, I want you guys to think about this one-- something I know can be really difficult, but I want you to give it a shot.   ;)

Think about where people live. Homes, huts, bungalows, RVs, trailers, apartments, motels, condos, hotels, and the list goes on and on. What do these places all have in common? They: a) are located on the ground, which is where we live. b) serve genuine functions, such as providing running water and heating or, simply, protection from the elements. c) are located near other shelters and places of residence, oftentimes. d) are located near resources such as fresh water supplies, lots of food, etc.

People don't live in planes, hot air balloons, jets, helicopters, gliders, or anything like that. Why? Because they: a) are located in the air, which we can't continuously live in. b) will be much more difficult, if not impossible, to serve genuine functions and provide protection from the elements (over longer periods of time, a few hours on a flight is fine). c) are isolated forms of "shelter", meaning you won't have any neighbors or community. d) are isolated from important resources such as food and water. Plus, you have to land and re-fuel at some point, and somebody has to keep an eye on the controls, and so much more.

So, taking this all into consideration, do you find a tin can circling above the earth-- supposedly permanently-- flying around all by its lonesome, with no close proximity to any form of resources (whether human or food or whatever) and an extremely questionable, highly unlikely ability to provide functions and shelter, a suitable place for anybody to live? Furthermore, do you find my assertion that people don't live there more crazy than your guys' assertion that people do live there?
Yes.
Ignored by Intikam since 2016.

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2017, 12:11:48 AM »
Yes.

Please explain. The burden of proof is with you guys.

Offline Rekt

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2017, 02:50:07 AM »
Evidence? Hard-to-find Bugs Bunny calls that evidence?

I chuckled. Now, I want you guys to think about this one-- something I know can be really difficult, but I want you to give it a shot.   ;)

Think about where people live. Homes, huts, bungalows, RVs, trailers, apartments, motels, condos, hotels, and the list goes on and on. What do these places all have in common? They: a) are located on the ground, which is where we live. b) serve genuine functions, such as providing running water and heating or, simply, protection from the elements. c) are located near other shelters and places of residence, oftentimes. d) are located near resources such as fresh water supplies, lots of food, etc.

People don't live in planes, hot air balloons, jets, helicopters, gliders, or anything like that. Why? Because they: a) are located in the air, which we can't continuously live in. b) will be much more difficult, if not impossible, to serve genuine functions and provide protection from the elements (over longer periods of time, a few hours on a flight is fine). c) are isolated forms of "shelter", meaning you won't have any neighbors or community. d) are isolated from important resources such as food and water. Plus, you have to land and re-fuel at some point, and somebody has to keep an eye on the controls, and so much more.

So, taking this all into consideration, do you find a tin can circling above the earth-- supposedly permanently-- flying around all by its lonesome, with no close proximity to any form of resources (whether human or food or whatever) and an extremely questionable, highly unlikely ability to provide functions and shelter, a suitable place for anybody to live? Furthermore, do you find my assertion that people don't live there more crazy than your guys' assertion that people do live there?

What you don't realize is how there are frequent cargo missions to it, it does not have engines or fuel, that's what ORBIT means, and it is shipped air and such on those cargo missions. There are several people on it, for community, and they have exercise machines to keep fit. They switch their time between exercise and science experiments and rest to keep them active and not insane.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #33 on: January 28, 2017, 04:20:10 AM »
Evidence? Hard-to-find Bugs Bunny calls that evidence?

I chuckled. Now, I want you guys to think about this one-- something I know can be really difficult, but I want you to give it a shot.   ;)

Think about where people live. Homes, huts, bungalows, RVs, trailers, apartments, motels, condos, hotels, and the list goes on and on. What do these places all have in common? They: a) are located on the ground, which is where we live. b) serve genuine functions, such as providing running water and heating or, simply, protection from the elements. c) are located near other shelters and places of residence, oftentimes. d) are located near resources such as fresh water supplies, lots of food, etc.

People don't live in planes, hot air balloons, jets, helicopters, gliders, or anything like that. Why? Because they: a) are located in the air, which we can't continuously live in. b) will be much more difficult, if not impossible, to serve genuine functions and provide protection from the elements (over longer periods of time, a few hours on a flight is fine). c) are isolated forms of "shelter", meaning you won't have any neighbors or community. d) are isolated from important resources such as food and water. Plus, you have to land and re-fuel at some point, and somebody has to keep an eye on the controls, and so much more.

So, taking this all into consideration, do you find a tin can circling above the earth-- supposedly permanently-- flying around all by its lonesome, with no close proximity to any form of resources (whether human or food or whatever) and an extremely questionable, highly unlikely ability to provide functions and shelter, a suitable place for anybody to live? Furthermore, do you find my assertion that people don't live there more crazy than your guys' assertion that people do live there?
I asked for evidence. That is not evidence.

Back in the days of early global exploration in sailing ships people were away from home and support for months at a time, without any contact with homebase at all.
Judging be the death rate on those expedition's,  that was at least as hazardous as being on the ISS.
Or look at Amundsen's and Scott''s expeditions to the South Pole. They were in an environment every bit as hostile as space in its own way. At least on the ISS they have comfortable living conditions.

We're all those expeditions fake for that reason.

You can't understand why anyone would do it, so you claim it is all faked.  I don't see any value in that as evidence.

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2017, 04:29:31 AM »
I asked for evidence. That is not evidence.

Back in the days of early global exploration in sailing ships people were away from home and support for months at a time, without any contact with homebase at all.
Judging be the death rate on those expedition's,  that was at least as hazardous as being on the ISS.
Or look at Amundsen's and Scott''s expeditions to the South Pole. They were in an environment every bit as hostile as space in its own way. At least on the ISS they have comfortable living conditions.

We're all those expeditions fake for that reason.

You can't understand why anyone would do it, so you claim it is all faked.  I don't see any value in that as evidence.

It is observational evidence.

As well, I don't consider a ship at sea and a tin can circling above the planar Earth on the same level, in terms of travel and safety (or lack thereof). Also, an Antarctic expedition isn't nearly as hostile as the way space is described as supposedly being. And they don't have comfortable living conditions on the ISS because no one lives there. Anyway, these expeditions that you mentioned weren't faked, obviously.

This has less to do with me understanding why anyone would do it, and more to do with me understanding that people can't do it. I very much doubt that we're capable of such a feat as going into space, especially for prolonged periods of time. People can survive the vast oceans and harsh, frozen wastelands for a brief time, but space? That's a whole 'nother ballpark.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2017, 04:54:46 AM »
I asked for evidence. That is not evidence.

Back in the days of early global exploration in sailing ships people were away from home and support for months at a time, without any contact with homebase at all.
Judging be the death rate on those expedition's,  that was at least as hazardous as being on the ISS.
Or look at Amundsen's and Scott''s expeditions to the South Pole. They were in an environment every bit as hostile as space in its own way. At least on the ISS they have comfortable living conditions.

We're all those expeditions fake for that reason.

You can't understand why anyone would do it, so you claim it is all faked.  I don't see any value in that as evidence.

It is observational evidence.

As well, I don't consider a ship at sea and a tin can circling above the planar Earth on the same level, in terms of travel and safety (or lack thereof). Also, an Antarctic expedition isn't nearly as hostile as the way space is described as supposedly being. And they don't have comfortable living conditions on the ISS because no one lives there. Anyway, these expeditions that you mentioned weren't faked, obviously.

This has less to do with me understanding why anyone would do it, and more to do with me understanding that people can't do it. I very much doubt that we're capable of such a feat as going into space, especially for prolonged periods of time. People can survive the vast oceans and harsh, frozen wastelands for a brief time, but space? That's a whole 'nother ballpark.
They can survive space in an artificial life support system.
Even in the Antarctic survival for more than a short time does need "artificial" life support, much less high-tech than the ISS, but still artificial.
In a raging sea the artificial environment of the ship is vital, lose that and you're gone in a few minutes.

But you are the same as so many other Flat Earthers.
They are so deluded by their own imagined brilliance that they think that if they can't understand something, it can't be done.

Whereas a more realistic attitude is to recognise that if you can't understand something you should do some research into the topic.
It was Einstein that said "The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know."

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #36 on: January 28, 2017, 05:11:34 AM »
But you are the same as so many other Flat Earthers.
They are so deluded by their own imagined brilliance that they think that if they can't understand something, it can't be done.

Whereas a more realistic attitude is to recognise that if you can't understand something you should do some research into the topic.
It was Einstein that said "The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know."
Since this is devolving into off-topic personal attacks, as so many of you round eathers are strangely fond of, I'll be ditching this thread following this post.

I'm not deluded by my own imagined brilliance. I'm not that smart, nor am I especially skilled. I consider myself to be an everyday man. As well, it's not for a lack of understanding that I think something can't be done, but rather my understanding heavily inclines me to believe that it can't be done. Therefore, I profess that it can't be done.

You know what I didn't understand? How could the Earth be a globe? Funny enough, I ended up here.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #37 on: January 28, 2017, 10:38:43 AM »
I'm not deluded by my own imagined brilliance. I'm not that smart, nor am I especially skilled. I consider myself to be an everyday man. As well, it's not for a lack of understanding that I think something can't be done, but rather my understanding heavily inclines me to believe that it can't be done. Therefore, I profess that it can't be done.

You know what I didn't understand? How could the Earth be a globe? Funny enough, I ended up here.
I think you have verified exactly what I was saying.

You claim "my understanding heavily inclines me to believe that it can't be done. Therefore, I profess that it can't be done."

My whole point is simply because you or I believe something can't be done really means nothing.
Neither you nor I can know how everything can be done, but that does not mean that they cannot be done.

Now it's your right to believe that something cannot be don't,  but to go from there to "profess that it can't be done" and accuse others of deception is a step too far.

What you are doing is accusing numerous others of intentionally deceiving us, they are people, so you are also guilty of personal attacks.

Bye bye.

Elusive Rabbit

Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #38 on: January 28, 2017, 03:55:46 PM »
My whole point is simply because you or I believe something can't be done really means nothing.
Neither you nor I can know how everything can be done, but that does not mean that they cannot be done.
You know what, I'll come back for a little bit. How is that for a change of heart?  :-*

For example: Based on my understanding of human anatomy, I'm aware that we cannot fly without assistance. Therefore, I profess the belief that unaided flight cannot be achieved. This isn't a matter of simply not knowing how unaided flight can be done, of merely believing that it can't be done. It is a matter of examining the available evidence, thinking it through, and drawing a logical conclusion, one that becomes my belief. Beliefs in the viability, or lack thereof, of things are relevant. Such beliefs have a basis.

Another example: Based on my understanding of Noah's Ark, I'm aware that such a situation is preposterous. There, I profess the belief that Noah's Ark is a myth. This isn't a matter of simply not knowing how Noah's Ark could be done (though Ken Ham may have tried to explain it, that moron...), of merely believing that it can't be done. It is a matter of examining the available evidence, thinking it through, and drawing a logical conclusion, one that becomes my belief. Again-- beliefs in the viability, or lack thereof, of things are relevant. Such beliefs have a basis.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: If the Earth is flat, why is the ISS observable with binoculars?
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2017, 03:01:18 AM »
My whole point is simply because you or I believe something can't be done really means nothing.
Neither you nor I can know how everything can be done, but that does not mean that they cannot be done.
You know what, I'll come back for a little bit. How is that for a change of heart?  :-*

For example: Based on my understanding of human anatomy, I'm aware that we cannot fly without assistance. Therefore, I profess the belief that unaided flight cannot be achieved. This isn't a matter of simply not knowing how unaided flight can be done, of merely believing that it can't be done. It is a matter of examining the available evidence, thinking it through, and drawing a logical conclusion, one that becomes my belief. Beliefs in the viability, or lack thereof, of things are relevant. Such beliefs have a basis.

Another example: Based on my understanding of Noah's Ark, I'm aware that such a situation is preposterous. There, I profess the belief that Noah's Ark is a myth. This isn't a matter of simply not knowing how Noah's Ark could be done (though Ken Ham may have tried to explain it, that moron...),
Fancy bringing up Ken Ham. He happens to come from here, and is a not too distant relative - well one of my sons married on one Ken Ham's neices.
But don't worry about offending me. Both my son and I think about the same of Ken Ham as you do,  :P though I wouldn't use the term moron in the presence of my son's in-laws!  :P

Quote from: Elusive Rabbit
of merely believing that it can't be done. It is a matter of examining the available evidence, thinking it through, and drawing a logical conclusion, one that becomes my belief. Again-- beliefs in the viability, or lack thereof, of things are relevant. Such beliefs have a basis.

I guess our conclusions differ somewhat. I would think that living in the ISS is somewhat akin to living in a nuclear submarine that can stay immersed for months.
The outside environment in the submarine is more hostile in many ways.
A submarine can be subject to tens of atmospheres pressure trying to crush the pressure hull.
The ISS is only subject to a pressure difference of one atmosphere, and that is pushing outwards, that requires a far less strong "pressure vessel".
This environment outside the submarine is just at deadly to humans as that outside the ISS.

If there is a serious malfunction in a submarine we know the end result - almost certain death, unless they are shallow enough to allow escape suits to be used.
In the case of a crushed hull, and it has happened often enough, the end of the submarine crew is well known.

Minor leaks in the ISS do occur and can be repaired. While the ISS is pressurised to sea-level conditions, the crew could survive much lower pressures for quite a long period.

'Nuff said, you don't believe humans can do it, I and I guess most people do.