Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #60 on: May 13, 2020, 04:22:17 PM »
If you measure an angle of 45 degrees to the polestar then that tells you you are at 45 north on FE or RE .
Can you explain how that works on a FE?
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Offline somerled

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2020, 04:23:41 PM »
All globe worshipers require calculations because they think the pole star is at some fantastic distance and its light reaches us in parallel rays . FE does not require calculations

Sextant measures angles only from the position you take the measurement. You interpret whether the 45 degree angle is due to a spherical earth and you are angled towards the parallel rays or you are on a flat plane and the star is not at a ludicrous distance

1. Depends on the length of degrees.

2. It's difficult to see any star at less than about 3 degrees .

One can draw a diagram of anything one wants if you've a pen and paper.

Offline BRrollin

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #62 on: May 13, 2020, 04:33:30 PM »
All globe worshipers require calculations because they think the pole star is at some fantastic distance and its light reaches us in parallel rays . FE does not require calculations

Sextant measures angles only from the position you take the measurement. You interpret whether the 45 degree angle is due to a spherical earth and you are angled towards the parallel rays or you are on a flat plane and the star is not at a ludicrous distance

1. Depends on the length of degrees.

2. It's difficult to see any star at less than about 3 degrees .

One can draw a diagram of anything one wants if you've a pen and paper.

Well, the FE wiki would disagree with you that FE worshippers don’t need calculations.

Interesting, if the stars were not far away, then wouldn’t we catch up to them on a FE, since we are accelerating with UA?
“This just shows that you don't even understand the basic principle of UA...A projectile that goes up and then down again to an observer on Earth is not accelerating, it is the observer on Earth who accelerates.”

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #63 on: May 13, 2020, 05:03:54 PM »
If you measure an angle of 45 degrees to the polestar then that tells you you are at 45 north on FE or RE .
Can you explain how that works on a FE?
To elaborate. On a FE the distances between each degree of latitude would change because, geometry:

That assumes light goes in straight lines of course and I know you have EA which comes to the rescue but it's funny how EA bends light just enough, if that is your explanation, to make it consistent with the observations we'd expect on a globe with Polaris a long long way away above the North Pole
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

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Offline JSS

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #64 on: May 13, 2020, 05:32:51 PM »
All globe worshipers require calculations because they think the pole star is at some fantastic distance and its light reaches us in parallel rays . FE does not require calculations

Sextant measures angles only from the position you take the measurement. You interpret whether the 45 degree angle is due to a spherical earth and you are angled towards the parallel rays or you are on a flat plane and the star is not at a ludicrous distance

1. Depends on the length of degrees.

2. It's difficult to see any star at less than about 3 degrees .

One can draw a diagram of anything one wants if you've a pen and paper.

That still isn't answering my simple question.

On a flat earth, how far in miles from the north pole are you if the angle to the north star is 45 degrees?

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Offline stack

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #65 on: May 13, 2020, 08:36:17 PM »
Here is an interesting document from the company that laid the Hibernia Express (Now ‘GTT Express’) submarine cable back in 2015 from Brean, UK to Halifax, NS (Originally slated to go to NYC.) The document lays out at a high-level how they went about determining the best operational route.

"Euclidean, Haversine and Great Circle Distances
The principle behind a low latency cable is the shortest route...The next solution is to use the Haversine formula to calculate the Great Circle route between two points on a sphere...This gives us a distance of 5577km from London to NewYork but the Haversine formula is for a sphere and the Earth is an oblate spheroid…Using the modified Vincenty formula the Great Circle distance from London to New York is 5594km this therefore is the theoretical shortest distance that could be achieved for a cable from London to New York.

If the route is split between land and marine, in the knowledge that the majority of marine routes can follow a great circle route if required, or at least close to one, then we can understand how far from the great circle route we can deviate before we compromise the overall latency of the system...Since submarine cables can invariably be installed in almost a great circle route then increasing the amount of submarine cable in the route between London and New York is the most effective way of keeping the latency low.

Putting all of these facts into consideration and ensuring that the ICPC recommendations for pipeline and cable crossings are taken into account a survey route has been found.
"



https://suboptic.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Poster_105.pdf

So it appears that the submarine cable engineers take great care in using the shortest possible route on an oblate spheroid following a great circle as best they can.
Not much is known about the celestial bodies and their distances.

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Offline GreatATuin

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #66 on: May 21, 2020, 09:22:29 AM »
If you measure an angle of 45 degrees to the polestar then that tells you you are at 45 north on FE or RE .
Can you explain how that works on a FE?
To elaborate. On a FE the distances between each degree of latitude would change because, geometry:

That assumes light goes in straight lines of course and I know you have EA which comes to the rescue but it's funny how EA bends light just enough, if that is your explanation, to make it consistent with the observations we'd expect on a globe with Polaris a long long way away above the North Pole

Polaris is the obvious choice, but note it would also have to account for the position of every star in the night sky for any given location. Which is something we know in great detail, and is easily explained in a RE model.
Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

you guys just read what you want to read

Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #67 on: May 31, 2020, 06:39:26 PM »
No - you misunderstand the sextant . It measures angles .

If you measure an angle of 45 degrees to the polestar then that tells you you are at 45 north on FE or RE .

FE requires no calculation for mapping . RE does for mapping onto a sphere.
For a company laying cables which map or model should they use?

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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Submarine cable distances
« Reply #68 on: May 31, 2020, 10:50:34 PM »
No - you misunderstand the sextant . It measures angles .

If you measure an angle of 45 degrees to the polestar then that tells you you are at 45 north on FE or RE .

OK, SHOW us what that means on FE.

45 WHAT North? 45 degrees? That's an ANGLE. Show us where you draw the angle. In order to have 45 degrees, you need two lines, meeting at a common point, where the displacement between the two is 45 degrees. Show us what you mean with that on FE.

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Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?