Offline Naiani

  • *
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« on: January 29, 2020, 04:16:41 PM »
I'm new to this forum, so I'm not sure if this is the right spot. In the Northern Hemisphere, I can understand how everyone could see the same stars if the stars are on the dome, or whatever your theory is on it. But the flat earth model doesn't work in the Southern Hemisphere. Can you explain to me how people at the southern tip of South America can see the same stars as those in Australia? They are on opposite sides of the map, but they both see the same stars, at the same time, moving in the same direction, which makes no sense.

*

Offline RoundLurker

  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Lurking since early 2018.
    • View Profile
The person in my avatar does not exist, and that's unsettling.

totallackey

Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2020, 04:29:44 PM »
I'm new to this forum, so I'm not sure if this is the right spot. In the Northern Hemisphere, I can understand how everyone could see the same stars if the stars are on the dome, or whatever your theory is on it. But the flat earth model doesn't work in the Southern Hemisphere. Can you explain to me how people at the southern tip of South America can see the same stars as those in Australia? They are on opposite sides of the map, but they both see the same stars, at the same time, moving in the same direction, which makes no sense.
I am having trouble with the statement, "...both see the same stars, at the same time..."

This implies that it is dark in Australia and South America at the same time.

I went to timeanddate.com and saw this:

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/moon/light.html

Could you clarify?

I mean, the link I provided totally debunks the statement you made.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2020, 04:32:17 PM by totallackey »

*

Offline RoundLurker

  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Lurking since early 2018.
    • View Profile
Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2020, 04:45:06 PM »

Celestial Navigation has been used for centuries and it is possible to see the same stars from multiple points in the southern hemisphere at the same time.  People looking South in Australia can see some of the same stars that people looking South in South Africa can see.  The flat earth maps in the Wiki/FAQ all show that these same people would be looking in completely different directions,  in most cases greater than 90 degrees. 

This could easily be replicated with cameras mounted to a globe looking south on the 35 degrees south latitude line that passes the tip of Africa and part of the southern coast of Australia.  The do the same thing on a flat surface with any one of the FE maps and point the cameras due south.  It will be painfully obvious why FE maps don't work.

How is this possible? 
How does Celestial Navigation work in the southern hemisphere on a flat earth?

Perhaps OP was meaning South Africa and South America?  Which reminds me of this classic unanswered post from 2017 :-)
The person in my avatar does not exist, and that's unsettling.

totallackey

Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2020, 04:55:09 PM »

Celestial Navigation has been used for centuries and it is possible to see the same stars from multiple points in the southern hemisphere at the same time.  People looking South in Australia can see some of the same stars that people looking South in South Africa can see.  The flat earth maps in the Wiki/FAQ all show that these same people would be looking in completely different directions,  in most cases greater than 90 degrees. 

This could easily be replicated with cameras mounted to a globe looking south on the 35 degrees south latitude line that passes the tip of Africa and part of the southern coast of Australia.  The do the same thing on a flat surface with any one of the FE maps and point the cameras due south.  It will be painfully obvious why FE maps don't work.

How is this possible? 
How does Celestial Navigation work in the southern hemisphere on a flat earth?

Perhaps OP was meaning South Africa and South America?  Which reminds me of this classic unanswered post from 2017 :-)
If he did mean that, then what's the problem?

I would expect anyone who experiences dark would see the same stars at some point.

But people in South Africa and South America would not see the same stars at the exact same time.

That is just ridiculous.

That is like me claiming I would see the exact same stars at the exact same time as my aunt 600 miles away.

Offline ChrisTP

  • *
  • Posts: 926
    • View Profile
Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2020, 05:48:24 PM »

Celestial Navigation has been used for centuries and it is possible to see the same stars from multiple points in the southern hemisphere at the same time.  People looking South in Australia can see some of the same stars that people looking South in South Africa can see.  The flat earth maps in the Wiki/FAQ all show that these same people would be looking in completely different directions,  in most cases greater than 90 degrees. 

This could easily be replicated with cameras mounted to a globe looking south on the 35 degrees south latitude line that passes the tip of Africa and part of the southern coast of Australia.  The do the same thing on a flat surface with any one of the FE maps and point the cameras due south.  It will be painfully obvious why FE maps don't work.

How is this possible? 
How does Celestial Navigation work in the southern hemisphere on a flat earth?

Perhaps OP was meaning South Africa and South America?  Which reminds me of this classic unanswered post from 2017 :-)
If he did mean that, then what's the problem?

I would expect anyone who experiences dark would see the same stars at some point.

But people in South Africa and South America would not see the same stars at the exact same time.

That is just ridiculous.

That is like me claiming I would see the exact same stars at the exact same time as my aunt 600 miles away.
Why wouldn't south america and south africa see some of the same stars at the same time? They're both on the southern hemisphere and both share the same night and day at some point throughout the 24 hours.

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/sunearth.html?iso=20200129T1012

https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/sunearth.html?iso=20200129T0112

if you're looking at the earth from the direction of a star, if you can see both places at the same time then both places can see your position at the same time too, correct?
Tom is wrong most of the time. Hardly big news, don't you think?

Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2020, 09:14:39 PM »
it's an interesting aspect of the flat earth question.

https://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=15638.msg201997#msg201997

*

Offline Pete Svarrior

  • e
  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 11724
  • (>^_^)> it's propaganda time (◕‿◕✿)
    • View Profile
    • The Flat Earth Society
Re: Stars in Northern Hemisphere vs Southern Hemisphere
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2020, 10:05:52 PM »
I'm new to this forum, so I'm not sure if this is the right spot.
Consider becoming sure prior to posting. Start with the stickied thread titled  READ BEFORE POSTING: Welcome to Flat Earth Investigations!

Locked.
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we've already addressed it.
Follow the Flat Earth Society on Twitter and Facebook!

<Parsifal> I like looking at Chinese Wikipedia with Noto installed
<Parsifal> I don't understand any of it but the symbols look nice