Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #80 on: August 06, 2019, 10:53:13 AM »
Ok, firstly thanks for the replies! Made some interesting reading. A few things I will point out, it's already been stated but there are many instances where either side says "my proof is I've seen it with my own eyes" or similar and the other debunks it because they haven't seen it. That's childish view points in my opinion.

One thing I would like to point out is in post #12 in reply to my second lot of questions/statements about "spinning objects" so to do exactly what I just said was childish in the previous paragraph, I have literally seen toilets spin the opposite way round in Australia to what it does here in the UK. Every time I went to the toilet in the 12 days I was in Australia and New Zealand (I traveled to 10 cities across both countries) and each time they spun the opposite direction to here. Every time. That was using different toilets in different buildings in different cities. Simply saying no they don't isn't a helpful way to have this discussion. What would it take? Me to stay by your side and repeat the trip to Australia (to ensure I'm not using setup toilets you could choose the city and toilet in this hypothetical experiment) and compare and record them using your own tested to be accurate camera? Trees are the same, I've always been fascinated by twists in trees and these again differ, I could provide photos but someone would just say I doctored the image or something.
Water going down a toilet or sink has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

Please perform more research.

This topic has been adequately debunked.

Yes, this is just a myth because sinks and toilets does not hold sufficient enough water! However if you create a drain big enough it will spin in opposite directions north/south. It is the same with cyclones, which are counterclockwise-rotating storms in the Northern Hemisphere, but rotate clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The circulation directions result from interactions between moving masses of air and air masses moving with the rotating earth.

Offline ChrisTP

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Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #81 on: August 06, 2019, 11:35:57 AM »
Ok, firstly thanks for the replies! Made some interesting reading. A few things I will point out, it's already been stated but there are many instances where either side says "my proof is I've seen it with my own eyes" or similar and the other debunks it because they haven't seen it. That's childish view points in my opinion.

One thing I would like to point out is in post #12 in reply to my second lot of questions/statements about "spinning objects" so to do exactly what I just said was childish in the previous paragraph, I have literally seen toilets spin the opposite way round in Australia to what it does here in the UK. Every time I went to the toilet in the 12 days I was in Australia and New Zealand (I traveled to 10 cities across both countries) and each time they spun the opposite direction to here. Every time. That was using different toilets in different buildings in different cities. Simply saying no they don't isn't a helpful way to have this discussion. What would it take? Me to stay by your side and repeat the trip to Australia (to ensure I'm not using setup toilets you could choose the city and toilet in this hypothetical experiment) and compare and record them using your own tested to be accurate camera? Trees are the same, I've always been fascinated by twists in trees and these again differ, I could provide photos but someone would just say I doctored the image or something.
Water going down a toilet or sink has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

Please perform more research.

This topic has been adequately debunked.

Yes, this is just a myth because sinks and toilets does not hold sufficient enough water! However if you create a drain big enough it will spin in opposite directions north/south. It is the same with cyclones, which are counterclockwise-rotating storms in the Northern Hemisphere, but rotate clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The circulation directions result from interactions between moving masses of air and air masses moving with the rotating earth.
Though I do agree that weather is affected but this, a pool of water or even a swimming pool I don't think is so easy to test for the effect. Even the slightest disturbance can shift the water in one direction or the other. On such a small scale I personally don't believe water spins based on hemisphere.

You'll see videos online of famous tourist attractions where people pour a load of water into a sink and then release the water and it spins in a direction, then going to the other side of the equator a few feet away and doing the same and the water pours in the other direction, this is just a simple trick where they pour the bucket of water in at the angle they want the water to spin. I have yet to look up full sized whirlpools in the oceans though.
Tom is wrong most of the time. Hardly big news, don't you think?

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #82 on: August 06, 2019, 11:45:30 AM »
Ok, firstly thanks for the replies! Made some interesting reading. A few things I will point out, it's already been stated but there are many instances where either side says "my proof is I've seen it with my own eyes" or similar and the other debunks it because they haven't seen it. That's childish view points in my opinion.

One thing I would like to point out is in post #12 in reply to my second lot of questions/statements about "spinning objects" so to do exactly what I just said was childish in the previous paragraph, I have literally seen toilets spin the opposite way round in Australia to what it does here in the UK. Every time I went to the toilet in the 12 days I was in Australia and New Zealand (I traveled to 10 cities across both countries) and each time they spun the opposite direction to here. Every time. That was using different toilets in different buildings in different cities. Simply saying no they don't isn't a helpful way to have this discussion. What would it take? Me to stay by your side and repeat the trip to Australia (to ensure I'm not using setup toilets you could choose the city and toilet in this hypothetical experiment) and compare and record them using your own tested to be accurate camera? Trees are the same, I've always been fascinated by twists in trees and these again differ, I could provide photos but someone would just say I doctored the image or something.
Water going down a toilet or sink has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

Please perform more research.

This topic has been adequately debunked.

Yes, this is just a myth because sinks and toilets does not hold sufficient enough water! However if you create a drain big enough it will spin in opposite directions north/south. It is the same with cyclones, which are counterclockwise-rotating storms in the Northern Hemisphere, but rotate clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The circulation directions result from interactions between moving masses of air and air masses moving with the rotating earth.
Though I do agree that weather is affected but this, a pool of water or even a swimming pool I don't think is so easy to test for the effect. Even the slightest disturbance can shift the water in one direction or the other. On such a small scale I personally don't believe water spins based on hemisphere.

You'll see videos online of famous tourist attractions where people pour a load of water into a sink and then release the water and it spins in a direction, then going to the other side of the equator a few feet away and doing the same and the water pours in the other direction, this is just a simple trick where they pour the bucket of water in at the angle they want the water to spin. I have yet to look up full sized whirlpools in the oceans though.

I agree! It would have to be one large sink!! But the physics behind it is solid. The effect itself can be tested on a merry-go-round and two good friends.

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #83 on: August 06, 2019, 11:49:56 AM »
Posted this before but these guys did a pretty good experiment which shows the effect.

If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #84 on: August 06, 2019, 12:08:26 PM »
Ok, firstly thanks for the replies! Made some interesting reading. A few things I will point out, it's already been stated but there are many instances where either side says "my proof is I've seen it with my own eyes" or similar and the other debunks it because they haven't seen it. That's childish view points in my opinion.

One thing I would like to point out is in post #12 in reply to my second lot of questions/statements about "spinning objects" so to do exactly what I just said was childish in the previous paragraph, I have literally seen toilets spin the opposite way round in Australia to what it does here in the UK. Every time I went to the toilet in the 12 days I was in Australia and New Zealand (I traveled to 10 cities across both countries) and each time they spun the opposite direction to here. Every time. That was using different toilets in different buildings in different cities. Simply saying no they don't isn't a helpful way to have this discussion. What would it take? Me to stay by your side and repeat the trip to Australia (to ensure I'm not using setup toilets you could choose the city and toilet in this hypothetical experiment) and compare and record them using your own tested to be accurate camera? Trees are the same, I've always been fascinated by twists in trees and these again differ, I could provide photos but someone would just say I doctored the image or something.
Water going down a toilet or sink has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

Please perform more research.

This topic has been adequately debunked.

Yes, this is just a myth because sinks and toilets does not hold sufficient enough water! However if you create a drain big enough it will spin in opposite directions north/south. It is the same with cyclones, which are counterclockwise-rotating storms in the Northern Hemisphere, but rotate clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The circulation directions result from interactions between moving masses of air and air masses moving with the rotating earth.
Though I do agree that weather is affected but this, a pool of water or even a swimming pool I don't think is so easy to test for the effect. Even the slightest disturbance can shift the water in one direction or the other. On such a small scale I personally don't believe water spins based on hemisphere.

You'll see videos online of famous tourist attractions where people pour a load of water into a sink and then release the water and it spins in a direction, then going to the other side of the equator a few feet away and doing the same and the water pours in the other direction, this is just a simple trick where they pour the bucket of water in at the angle they want the water to spin. I have yet to look up full sized whirlpools in the oceans though.

I agree! It would have to be one large sink!! But the physics behind it is solid. The effect itself can be tested on a merry-go-round and two good friends.
The merry go round does not test anything.

Even according to RE adherents, it simply serves as a demonstration.

In this case, it serves that one moving object can have an effect on another.

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #85 on: August 06, 2019, 12:13:43 PM »
Ok, firstly thanks for the replies! Made some interesting reading. A few things I will point out, it's already been stated but there are many instances where either side says "my proof is I've seen it with my own eyes" or similar and the other debunks it because they haven't seen it. That's childish view points in my opinion.

One thing I would like to point out is in post #12 in reply to my second lot of questions/statements about "spinning objects" so to do exactly what I just said was childish in the previous paragraph, I have literally seen toilets spin the opposite way round in Australia to what it does here in the UK. Every time I went to the toilet in the 12 days I was in Australia and New Zealand (I traveled to 10 cities across both countries) and each time they spun the opposite direction to here. Every time. That was using different toilets in different buildings in different cities. Simply saying no they don't isn't a helpful way to have this discussion. What would it take? Me to stay by your side and repeat the trip to Australia (to ensure I'm not using setup toilets you could choose the city and toilet in this hypothetical experiment) and compare and record them using your own tested to be accurate camera? Trees are the same, I've always been fascinated by twists in trees and these again differ, I could provide photos but someone would just say I doctored the image or something.
Water going down a toilet or sink has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

Please perform more research.

This topic has been adequately debunked.

Yes, this is just a myth because sinks and toilets does not hold sufficient enough water! However if you create a drain big enough it will spin in opposite directions north/south. It is the same with cyclones, which are counterclockwise-rotating storms in the Northern Hemisphere, but rotate clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The circulation directions result from interactions between moving masses of air and air masses moving with the rotating earth.
Though I do agree that weather is affected but this, a pool of water or even a swimming pool I don't think is so easy to test for the effect. Even the slightest disturbance can shift the water in one direction or the other. On such a small scale I personally don't believe water spins based on hemisphere.

You'll see videos online of famous tourist attractions where people pour a load of water into a sink and then release the water and it spins in a direction, then going to the other side of the equator a few feet away and doing the same and the water pours in the other direction, this is just a simple trick where they pour the bucket of water in at the angle they want the water to spin. I have yet to look up full sized whirlpools in the oceans though.

I agree! It would have to be one large sink!! But the physics behind it is solid. The effect itself can be tested on a merry-go-round and two good friends.
The merry go round does not test anything.

Even according to RE adherents, it simply serves as a demonstration.

In this case, it serves that one moving object can have an effect on another.

Yes, you are right! It demonstrates the effect. I apologize for the poor choice of words. But still cyclones, hurricanes etc. spins in different directions depending on which hemisphere it is located in.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #86 on: August 06, 2019, 06:47:22 PM »
Posted this before but these guys did a pretty good experiment which shows the effect.



American Scientist doesn't think that this experiment shows anything.

https://www.americanscientist.org/blog/science-culture/the-coriolis-and-the-commode

Quote
All things being equal, if you make sure that the water is motionless and no other forces are introduced during the process, Coriolis would be the big winner in the battle royal of forces acting on the liquid draining from that kiddie pool. And for Muller and Sandlin, it worked! They tried their experiment three times in each hemisphere. In each case the water rotated clockwise in the southern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere. Proof! Right?

Well, not so fast. The YouTube experiments were actually based on previous ones done in a laboratory setting. In those highly controlled settings, scientists at MIT in the 1960s were able to show that Coriolis could work on a draining tub. In fact, I have been told that graduate students at MIT still do this experiment today in one of their classes. The major difference between the past examples and the current YouTube version is that one was done in a lab with a fine control over outside forces and the other uses a kiddie pool set up on a plywood platform in a garage or sheltered patio. In the video experiments any number of things may have introduced an outside force that could swamp the comparatively tiny influence from the Earth’s rotation. Temperature differences in the water could create currents; tiny bumps in the texture of the kiddie pool or plywood could guide the flow; the way the valve released the water could steer the movement; and, especially for the outdoor experiment, a slight breeze could push the water along. A systematic error could have led to the same consistent results seen in the videos.

This is not to say these YouTube experiments did not work. It’s just that a lot of other things could have affected the results besides the Earth’s rotation. Of course, regular folks do not have access to the type of laboratories and equipment needed to control for all other factors and allow the Earth’s rotation to determine the outcome. And part of the purpose of these videos is to show viewers an experiment they can recreate on their own.

Maintaining that degree of accessibility while satisfying skeptics like me would involve putting together a larger sample size of experiments similar to the ones made by Muller and Sandlin, done in different locations across both hemispheres. Then we could get a better idea of whether the setup shown in “The Truth about Toilet Swirl” did in fact allow the Coriolis effect to shine. Until then, I’ll remain unconvinced that what we saw truly resulted from the Coriolis effect.

Ultimately, of course, this is nitpicking. The videos were educational, and the explanation of what the Coriolis effect means for air or water moving on Earth was on the money, regardless of whether I completely accept the experiment’s setup.

Therefore, I guess the only thing left to do is to assemble an army of kiddie-pool Coriolis experimenters to figure this out once and for all. If you bring the pool, I’ll supply the water (void in California). The Earth will provide the spin.

The laboratory tests of the Coriolis Effect have been long controversial:

https://wiki.tfes.org/Coriolis_Effect#Laboratory_Water_Vortex_Experiments

Quote
In the 1960s a researcher named Ascher Shapiro claimed that water vortex direction was due to the "Coriolis Effect". The experiments started with bathtubs and then escalated to six foot wide tanks of water:

http://classic.scopeweb.mit.edu/articles/shapiros-bathtub-experiment/ (Archive)

  “ Shapiro’s Bathtub Experiment
by Conor Myhrvold
posted November 1, 2011 at 12:53 pm
Over forty years ago, in the 1960s, the world briefly became captivated with how a bathtub drains. Did something called the Coriolis effect influence the twirling water?

The Earth’s rotation influences how fluids swirl on the planet’s surface. It’s why low-pressure systems in the northern hemisphere twist counterclockwise. This phenomenon, known as the Coriolis effect, is the appearance of an object to deflect to one side in a rotating reference frame. Since it is such a tiny effect on small scales, no one had yet proven that this inertial force actually affects how water leaves a bathtub, despite many previous efforts.

In 1962, the same year that Watson and Crick received their Nobel Prize for the discovery of the double helix, MIT professor Ascher Shapiro, an expert in fluid mechanics, set up an elaborate test to try to change that. Shapiro’s elementary experiment, which started with a bathtub, quickly turned into a complicated and ambitious undertaking that involved a tank six feet wide and six inches deep.

The Coriolis effect at MIT’s latitude, 42°, was just “thirty-millionths that of gravity, which is so small that it will be overcome by filling and even temperature differences and water impurities,” reported one of many newspapers and periodicals that covered the results of Shapiro’s experiment. After much tinkering to cancel out these interferences, and presumably a hefty water bill, Shapiro found the answer: the Coriolis effect does indeed cause a bathtub vortex in the northern hemisphere to swirl counterclockwise.

But even after his results were published in a letter to Nature, Shapiro’s confirmation drew the skepticism of readers. In correspondence with one reader, Shapiro noted: “Many results contradictory to this have been reported in the literature but all of them have involved faulty experiments due to a lack of realization of how sensitive the experiment is.” He was supported, however, by colleagues in the Northern hemisphere who confirmed the counterclockwise bathtub drainage, while those in the Southern hemisphere demonstrated the same effect in the opposite direction—a clockwise flow—just as anticipated.

In a world without electronic communication, where author correspondence was a more prolonged affair, a sort of chivalry existed between a scientist and a popular audience who took an interest in academics. Scrawled with a pencil on back-and-forth correspondences between Shapiro and his fans and housed today within a dusty and faded folder in the MIT archives are the records of reprints being sent, of questions being answered, and of careful and nuanced responses that understated Shapiro’s high standing at MIT. A Ford Professor at the time, and later elevated to Institute professor, Shapiro took time to send article reprints for those who asked for it and to answer mail from inquisitive readers, some of whom promoted dubious questions and claims.

...Who would have thought the swirl of a bathtub would have been a matter of great interest? For a seemingly insignificant problem, the bathtub controversy loomed large in Shapiro’s career until his death in 2004. The first line of his obituary in the Boston Globe read: “Dr. Ascher Shapiro wanted to get a handle on how fluids move whether they were swirling down the bathtub drain, or flowing through the human body.” ”

Controversy because other researchers were getting different and inconsistent results. Shapiro claimed that he could perform the experiment and that all other researchers were wrong.

The below shows that even with extreme care the direction of the vortex can be influenced by very small perturbations such as how the lid is lifted.

http://web.aeromech.usyd.edu.au/history-chapters/C3%20ThermoFluids.pdf (Archive)

  “ At Tom Fink’s invitation, Professor Lloyd M. Trefethen of Tufts University, USA, spent a short sabbatical in Mechanical Engineering in 1964/65. Already famous for his work on surface tension phenomena, he led us into a repeat of the experiments on the bathtub vortex that had recently been conducted by Ascher Shapiro at MIT. After much careful design, a circular tank of some 2.4m in diameter and 0.4m depth was constructed and installed in one of the subterranean dungeons of the old Peter Nicol Russell building. Carefully designed procedures and their diligent execution resulted in absolutely conclusive results that were published in Nature (Trefethen, et al, 1965). A re-enactment for the local media was a disaster: Bilger and Tanner muffed the removal of the covering baffles creating a great vortex in the water that then went out the wrong way. ‘Scientists baffled’ cried the media. We even made Time magazine! ”

In Flow, Nature's Patterns, a Tapestry in Three Parts (Archive) by Dr. Phillip Ball (Archive) the author gives an overview on p. 47:

  “ A popular notion says that the rotation of the earth starts the bathtub vortex spinning. But while it is certainly true that this rotation controls the direction of the giant atmospheric vortices of cyclones, which rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern, the influence of the Earth’s rotation on a micro-cyclone in the bath should be extremely weak. Biesel claimed that it cannot be responsible for the bathtub vortex because, contrary to popular belief, they may rotate in either direction at any place on the planet. But is that really so? In 1962 the American engineer Ascher Shapiro at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology claimed that he had consistently produced counter-clockwise vortices in his lab by first allowing the water to settle for 24 hours, dissipating any residual rotational motion, before pulling the plug. The claim sparked controversy: later researchers said that the experiment was extremely sensitive to the precise conditions in which it was conducted. The dispute has never quite been resolved. We do know, however, why a small initial rotation of the liquid develops into a robust vortex. This is due to the movement of the water as it converges on the outlet. In theory this convergence can be completely symmetrical: water moves inwards to the plughole from all directions. But the slightest departure from that symmetrical situation, which could happen at random, may be amplified because of the way fluidflow operates. ”

An abstract at the Physical Society of Japan states:

  “ It has long been controversial whether the Coriolis force due to the rotation of the earth plays a significant role in the generation of the bathtub vortex in small vessels such as bathtubs. ”
« Last Edit: August 06, 2019, 06:52:28 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #87 on: August 06, 2019, 09:56:02 PM »
Thanks. Two useful articles which back up the macroscopic effects of the Coriolis effect which, as those articles agree, is caused by the globe earth’s rotation while acknowledging how difficult the effect is to detect in smaller settings.

Interesting you apply so much scrutiny to experiments which show you to be wrong while taking those which imply you may be correct at face value.
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #88 on: August 07, 2019, 12:48:56 AM »
It's not my scrutiny. I don't run the American Scientist website. You should take it up with the scientist if your feelings have been hurt.

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #89 on: August 07, 2019, 05:46:15 AM »
It's not my scrutiny. I don't run the American Scientist website. You should take it up with the scientist if your feelings have been hurt.
Feelings hurt by 2 articles which back up the globe earth model? What a strange thing to say  :D
Some quotes from the above:

Quote
All things being equal, if you make sure that the water is motionless and no other forces are introduced during the process, Coriolis would be the big winner in the battle royal of forces acting on the liquid draining from that kiddie pool.

Quote
In those highly controlled settings, scientists at MIT in the 1960s were able to show that Coriolis could work on a draining tub.

Quote
the explanation of what the Coriolis effect means for air or water moving on Earth was on the money

Quote
If you bring the pool, I’ll supply the water (void in California). The Earth will provide the spin.

Quote
The Earth’s rotation influences how fluids swirl on the planet’s surface. It’s why low-pressure systems in the northern hemisphere twist counterclockwise. This phenomenon, known as the Coriolis effect, is the appearance of an object to deflect to one side in a rotating reference frame.

Quote
He was supported, however, by colleagues in the Northern hemisphere who confirmed the counterclockwise bathtub drainage, while those in the Southern hemisphere demonstrated the same effect in the opposite direction—a clockwise flow—just as anticipated.

Quote
After much careful design, a circular tank of some 2.4m in diameter and 0.4m depth was constructed and installed in one of the subterranean dungeons of the old Peter Nicol Russell building. Carefully designed procedures and their diligent execution resulted in absolutely conclusive results that were published in Nature

Quote
In 1962 the American engineer Ascher Shapiro at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology claimed that he had consistently produced counter-clockwise vortices in his lab by first allowing the water to settle for 24 hours, dissipating any residual rotational motion, before pulling the plug.

Quote
it is certainly true that [the Earth's] rotation controls the direction of the giant atmospheric vortices of cyclones, which rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern,

Thanks for presenting those articles as further evidence for the globe earth, not quite clear why you did that but it’s all useful.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 08:57:44 AM by AllAroundTheWorld »
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #90 on: August 07, 2019, 05:19:16 PM »
Interesting, so we should assume then that you have given up on your youtube experiment and are instead hinging on statements like "the earth will provide the spin"? Sounds pretty convincing to me.

Dr. Phillip Ball says that Shapiro's claim was controversial:

Quote
In 1962 the American engineer Ascher Shapiro at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology claimed that he had consistently produced counter-clockwise vortices in his lab by first allowing the water to settle for 24 hours, dissipating any residual rotational motion, before pulling the plug. The claim sparked controversy: later researchers said that the experiment was extremely sensitive to the precise conditions in which it was conducted. The dispute has never quite been resolved.

Dr. Parasnis of the University of Lulea wrote to New Scientist to inform them of the following:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg13918906-400-letters-in-a-spin/

Quote
Letters: In a spin
By D. S. PARASNIS

It is indeed surprising that the myth of a discernible Coriolis force
effect on the water in a bath tub persists. Apart from the weakness of the
force pointed out in the editorial, the myth was experimentally examined
in 1965 by L. M. Trefethen et al in an extremely careful experiment and
found to have no basis (‘The bath-tub vortex in the southern hemisphere’,
Nature, vol 207, p 1085.

D. S. Parasnis University of Lulea, Sweden
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 09:38:51 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Questions after watching documentaries
« Reply #91 on: August 08, 2019, 10:37:53 AM »
Interesting, so we should assume then that you have given up on your youtube experiment
The experiment looks pretty good to me. They've explained how they did it, what they did to mitigate the possibility of the movement being caused by the way the water was put into the pool and they even mitigated the risk of a vortex being introduced when the water was drained by using a valve rather then a plug. They got results consistent with a globe earth so, of course, you have to desperately try to discredit what they found. As I said, strange how you take experiment results which appear to back up your ideas at face value.

There is no dispute that the Coriolis effect is weak and hard to detect on the small scale, there's also no dispute that the science behind the Coriolis effect which causes storm systems to rotate in different directions in the different hemispheres is well understood and caused by the fact we live on a spinning ball. Both of the articles you posted back that up as does the new link you've provided:

Quote
But while it is certainly true that this rotation controls the direction of the giant atmospheric vortices of cyclones, which rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern, the influence of the Earth’s rotation on a micro-cyclone in the bath should be extremely weak

Why do you keep providing links to articles which back up the globe earth? ???

But yes, the effect on the small scale is hard to detect. The experiment these guys did looks like a pretty good attempt to do so.
As an empiricist and a zetetic I'm sure you are working on repeating these experiments to investigate this matter for yourself.
I look forward to seeing your results.
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.