Clock the Sky
« on: April 26, 2019, 08:17:19 PM »
You can adjust your clock by the movement of things on the sky.
The time a star or the Sun takes to move 15 degrees is exactly 60 minutes, or, 4 minutes per degree, EXACTLY.
It doesn't matter if right after rising in the East, at the top of the sky or right before setting in the west, the time and angle distribution is the same.

This means, the apparent movement of things in the sky is perfectly linear, and that have a simple explanation, the sky is still, our planet is what rotates in a very steady and constant speed exposing us to the universe.

You can NOT have this linearity if dealing with two parallel planes moving one against another, this is exactly what the flat earth model shows, a flat earth disc and a flat sky disc rotating overhead.  When parallel, your angle of view changes constantly, along with the apparent size and time per distance. 

The two images below, the left from the North pole and all the stars rotating around it CCW, the other from the South pole, all stars rotating around it in CW... that for itself kills the flat earth theory.

I wonder when some flat earth believer would contest and explain how this work in their flat world.


Re: Clock the Sky
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2019, 08:54:14 PM »
The time a star or the Sun takes to move 15 degrees is exactly 60 minutes, or, 4 minutes per degree, EXACTLY.
Nope. A star near Polaris will move significantly slower, and a star on the equator will move slightly faster.

And for the record, clocks were never set based on the speed at which stuff moves in the sky; they were historically set by a standard pendulum length and "sun at due north/south = 12:00 PM".
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Offline Baby Thork

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Re: Clock the Sky
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2019, 09:11:04 PM »
Yes, you can divide stars up and chop and change them to fit your agenda. But below is a full star map. All the stars as they appear overhead.



I have circled Polaris and Acrux for you. You really don't have to chop the sky into hemispheres unless you have an agenda. Note my nice straight grid lines ... as you see them. Not bent into two circles as your awful galactic charts show.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2019, 09:12:50 PM by Baby Thork »
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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Clock the Sky
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2019, 09:52:13 PM »
Surely you're obliged to chop the sky into the sections that you can see at any one time?

Unless you can show us how someone in (say) Nether Wallop, UK could see Polaris and Acrux simultaneuously?
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Re: Clock the Sky
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2019, 09:59:15 PM »
Chop the sky always related to the Equator view, please.
But even at any other latitude of observation, it will be 15° per hour. 
As usual, speed is distance divided by time, we are talking here in angular speed.
Even Polux makes 15° per hour in its tinny 360° circle per 24 hours.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2019, 10:19:27 PM by spherical »

Re: Clock the Sky
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2019, 10:01:57 PM »
Surely you're obliged to chop the sky into the sections that you can see at any one time?

Unless you can show us how someone in (say) Nether Wallop, UK could see Polaris and Acrux simultaneuously?

On flat earth sky it is possible to do it, right?,  ;) the same from windows of International Space Station when over Equator.