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Offline Tumeni

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2019, 06:23:04 PM »
It all started off quite well for me here, but after this the clouds rolled in and that was the last I saw. Missed the whole blood moon thing altogether.

Count yourself lucky if you hadn't travelled too far; in 1761 ....

"... Guillaume Le Gentil, whose experiences are wonderfully summarized by Timothy Ferris in Coming of Age in the Milky Way . Le Gentil set off from France a year ahead of time to observe the transit (of Venus) from India, but various setbacks left him still at sea on the day of the transit — just about the worst place to be since steady measurements were impossible on a pitching ship.

Undaunted, Le Gentil continued on to India to await the next transit in 1769. With eight years to prepare, he erected a first-rate viewing station, tested and retested his instruments, and had everything in a state of perfect readiness. On the morning of the second transit, June 4, 1769, he awoke to a fine day, but, just as Venus began its pass, a cloud slid in front of the
Sun and remained there for almost exactly the duration of the transit: three hours, fourteen minutes, and seven seconds.

Stoically, Le Gentil packed up his instruments and set off for the nearest port, but en route he contracted dysentery and was laid up for nearly a year. Still weakened, he finally made it  onto a ship. It was nearly wrecked in a hurricane off the African coast. When at last he reached home, eleven and a half years after setting off, and having achieved nothing, he discovered that his relatives had had him declared dead in his absence and had enthusiastically plundered his estate. "
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Pete Svarrior "We are not here to directly persuade anyone ... You mistake our lack of interest in you for our absence."

Tom Bishop "We are extremely popular and the entire world wants to talk to us. We have better things to do with our lives than have in depth discussions with every single curious person. You are lucky to get one sentence dismissals from us"

Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2019, 06:34:29 PM »
Wow! And there’s me moaning about wasting a couple of hours when I could have been sleeping.
Have to admire the commitment to experimenting and learning though.
If you are making your claim without evidence then we can discard it without evidence.

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Offline Bad Puppy

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2019, 06:50:15 PM »
Here are my photos from last night.  Holy crap it was cold out.  My wife probably thought I was crazy.

This was taken in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  Not a cloud in the sky.

Times taken:
Top Left: 10:43 PM ET
Top Right: 11:15 PM ET
Bottom Left: 11:42 PM ET
Bottom Right: 12:12 AM ET

Focal length 500mm.  Shutter speed, ISO and aperture varied due to diminishing brightness.

Quote from: Tom Bishop
...circles do not exist and pi is not 3.14159...

Quote from: totallackey
Do you have any evidence of reality?

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Offline Bad Puppy

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2019, 07:18:20 PM »
If the eclipse is being caused by an unknown shadow object, such as sandokhan's shadow moon (which is supposedly the same size as the moon, sun, and jupiter), then it's interesting that the shadow is so large yet the object causing the shadow can't be seen by anyone.  If anyone has personally witnessed such a shadow object (no NASA employees, please), I would love to see evidence of this.

The photo below shows an illustration of an extrapolation of the shadow based on the arc on the moon.


Please note:  The blue circle is NOT part of the original photo.  I added that to the photo of the moon for illustration purposes.
Quote from: Tom Bishop
...circles do not exist and pi is not 3.14159...

Quote from: totallackey
Do you have any evidence of reality?

shootingstar

Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2019, 08:30:46 PM »
The Moon was at perigee at the time of the eclipse, 357,342km. Using the size comparison of the Moons disk, your blue disk (shadow of the Earth) and the diameter of the Earth we should be able to show that the shadow of the Earth would indeed be that diameter at the Moons distance. 


Anyone who thinks that the Moon, Sun and Jupiter are all the same size clearly has no understanding of the solar system.

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Offline Tumeni

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2019, 07:31:45 AM »
If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

The direction in which the shadow moves over the Moon is entirely dictated by observer position/geographical location



Physically, it moves from right to left behind the Earth (if viewed from a point between Earth and Sun), but observers on or close to the equator will see/saw the shadow move from top to bottom or vice versa, whereas those at the poles will see it move from L-R or R-L depending on which pole they are at.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 07:35:01 AM by Tumeni »
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Pete Svarrior "We are not here to directly persuade anyone ... You mistake our lack of interest in you for our absence."

Tom Bishop "We are extremely popular and the entire world wants to talk to us. We have better things to do with our lives than have in depth discussions with every single curious person. You are lucky to get one sentence dismissals from us"

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2019, 05:42:07 PM »
If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

Source?
This is a misunderstanding on Tom's part. A number of us attempted to explain how it works, but I'm not sure he ever understood it or not. As of his last post in that thread he continued to state he didn't.

I recall not responding to the sloppy diagram you posted in that other thread because I didn't feel the need of embarrassing you over something that all could see was wrong.

If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

The direction in which the shadow moves over the Moon is entirely dictated by observer position/geographical location

Physically, it moves from right to left behind the Earth (if viewed from a point between Earth and Sun), but observers on or close to the equator will see/saw the shadow move from top to bottom or vice versa, whereas those at the poles will see it move from L-R or R-L depending on which pole they are at.

Something that moves from East to West will not move from West to East from a different position.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 06:02:25 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2019, 06:10:19 PM »
If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

Source?
This is a misunderstanding on Tom's part. A number of us attempted to explain how it works, but I'm not sure he ever understood it or not. As of his last post in that thread he continued to state he didn't.

I recall not responding to the sloppy diagram you posted in that other thread because I didn't feel the need of embarrassing you over something that all could see was wrong.
I'd love to see you explain how it's wrong. At worst I learn something new. At best we figure out where your ability to comprehend the situation is failing and we can correct it. Win/win. Not everyone has an inability to fathom they can be wrong. I'd also note not a single person commented that it was incorrect, and I'm willing to bet if I had it as wrong as you claim plenty of RE proponents would have corrected me on the matter. But let's see it hmm? I'd also note, your unwillingness to comment more doesn't make my statement false. You WERE still confused about the topic last you posted, and I maintain it's due to some misunderstanding on your end.

If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

The direction in which the shadow moves over the Moon is entirely dictated by observer position/geographical location

Physically, it moves from right to left behind the Earth (if viewed from a point between Earth and Sun), but observers on or close to the equator will see/saw the shadow move from top to bottom or vice versa, whereas those at the poles will see it move from L-R or R-L depending on which pole they are at.

Something that moves from East to West will not move from West to East from a different position.
East to West still needs to be defined. Which is the N pole of the Moon?  Is it supposed to be E to W from the perspective of Earth? I'm also still genuinely curious to see any evidence you have of the Eclipse NOT moving in the correct direction.

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Offline Tumeni

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2019, 02:39:03 PM »
Something that moves from East to West will not move from West to East from a different position.

As was said, you need to define which E/W you're referring to. Clarify.



If you're looking at cars moving in front of you, and you're looking North, then cars moving from your right to your left will be moving E to W.  If you stand on your head, they'll still be going E to W, but will appear to you to be going L to R.

If you stand upright again, and if the cars stay still, but you rotate clockwise on the spot, the cars will appear to move R to L, E to W in your field of view.     
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Pete Svarrior "We are not here to directly persuade anyone ... You mistake our lack of interest in you for our absence."

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Offline JCM

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2019, 11:20:40 PM »
Tom, What is your problem with it exactly? It is observed to happen or it doesn’t.  You can’t change reality.  This matches what a globe would see. If the Earth were flat, why would everyone see the same phase just turned depending on your latitude? On a flat Earth the phases would turn according to latitude  and different phases seen depending on longitude.  We see the phases of the moon every day do the exact same thing just slower.

Your inability to understand doesn’t change reality.

Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2019, 05:43:42 PM »
Something that moves from East to West will not move from West to East from a different position.

As was said, you need to define which E/W you're referring to. Clarify.

Can we all agree on this perhaps?

(from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selenographic_coordinates)




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Offline Tumeni

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Re: 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2019, 06:03:17 PM »
If you do watch the eclipse, take note of whether it comes from the East or the West on the moon's surface. Sometimes it runs contrary to RET.

The direction in which the shadow moves over the Moon is entirely dictated by observer position/geographical location

Physically, it moves from right to left behind the Earth (if viewed from a point between Earth and Sun), but observers on or close to the equator will see/saw the shadow move from top to bottom or vice versa, whereas those at the poles will see it move from L-R or R-L depending on which pole they are at.

Something that moves from East to West will not move from West to East from a different position.

If E-W is Left to Right for a person standing upright, then it will be Right to Left for a person standing on their head.

The physical direction is unchanged, but the observation is back-to-front.

An observer at a perpendicular to the Moon's orbital plane will see it move from their right to left, with the shadow first appearing on the left of the Moon

An observer aligned with this plane will see the Moon move from their feet to their head, with the shadow moving onto the top of the Moon first, OR move from their head to their feet, with the shadow encroaching from the bottom

No?


In response to a YouTuber who could not fathom why, when viewing from Florida, the 2018 eclipse appeared from the top of the Moon and not the bottom, I made a video. All I got in return was spurious comments about the observer figure not being to scale, or me not using a ball to represent the Moon. Let's see what you think

« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 06:09:59 PM by Tumeni »
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Pete Svarrior "We are not here to directly persuade anyone ... You mistake our lack of interest in you for our absence."

Tom Bishop "We are extremely popular and the entire world wants to talk to us. We have better things to do with our lives than have in depth discussions with every single curious person. You are lucky to get one sentence dismissals from us"