shootingstar

Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« on: January 20, 2019, 11:35:24 AM »
FEW states that the Suns area of light is elliptical.  Why not circular unless the Sun is somehow shining down on the Earth from an angle with directed beam like a stage light?   For the light from the Sun to be confined to a specific area, like the lighthouse analogy that FEW suggests, then this would need some kind of reflector and director in order to send the light into a specific direction.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2019, 05:25:50 PM by shootingstar »

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Offline Stagiri

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 06:40:26 PM »
If I remember correctly, some FEers propose the electromagnetic accelerator theory (see this thread).

By the way, I assume you are working with the unipolar model of the FE but that version has been "proved" impossible (thread). Mr Bishop than said that the FE is bipolar (voilà). I asked a similar question here but with no response.
Dr Rowbotham was accurate in his experiments.
How do you know without repeating them?
Because they don't need to be repeated, they were correct.

shootingstar

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2019, 08:28:55 PM »
Yes... I feel quite uncomfortable with anything which 'accelerates' electromagnetic radiation. Mind you if Mr Bishop can prove himself right with his equation and the 'Bishop' constant then he will make a fortune and force the re-writing of every physics textbook that has ever been written!

Online iamcpc

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2019, 07:23:18 PM »
FEW states that the Suns area of light is elliptical.  Why not circular unless the Sun is somehow shining down on the Earth from an angle with directed beam like a stage light?   For the light from the Sun to be confined to a specific area, like the lighthouse analogy that FEW suggests, then this would need some kind of reflector and director in order to send the light into a specific direction.

Shootingstar,




Here's a video. In this demo a "spotlight" sun shining through a refractive element can be many different shapes confined to a specific area.


Depending on your flat earth model the refractive element could be the dome, the firmament, the atmosphere, or any combination of those things.

shootingstar

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2019, 07:27:19 PM »
Cheers for that iamcpc.  So all we need to do now is find a massive glass dome up there somewhere.

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2019, 02:01:05 PM »
It strikes me that there is something obvious that people are missing re the idea of a local sun beaming down a spotlight onto the surface of a flat earth. That is that if you are standing on a plain at dawn, with the boundary of that plain having mountains, you see light striking the top of the mountain first, then work its way down. The ground gets lit up last. If there were a beam of light shining down, the edge of that beam approaching you would light up the plain first - in fact you’d see the leading edge of the beam approaching across the plain. Then you would see the mountain light up from the bottom. Obviously this not what you see. Ever been on a long haul flight and seen the sunrise? Ever seen the shadow of a mountain range across lower lying clouds? How is this possible if there is a local sun beaming down?

Online iamcpc

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2019, 12:07:28 AM »
Cheers for that iamcpc.  So all we need to do now is find a massive glass dome up there somewhere.

The demonstration is not so much about a dome. It's more about light behaving in an unusual manner when passing through some sort of refractive material.

In models with a dome or firmament someone can claim that is the refractive material.

In models without a dome or firmament someone can claim that the atmosphere is the refractive material.

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Offline WellRoundedIndividual

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2019, 03:09:30 AM »
And that's all they will remain until evidence is provided.
BobLawBlah.

manicminer

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2019, 08:26:50 AM »
Quote
The demonstration is not so much about a dome. It's more about light behaving in an unusual manner when passing through some sort of refractive material.

In models with a dome or firmament someone can claim that is the refractive material.

In models without a dome or firmament someone can claim that the atmosphere is the refractive material.


Or, we could simply say that day and night is due to sunlight only illuminating half of a spherical Earth which is rotating.  That seems to me to be a far more simple explanation and one that is entirely consistent with every day experience.

Why try to make something more complicated than it actually is just to make it work with the flat Earth ideology?

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2019, 01:17:26 AM »
I see no-one has responded to my question, (above, re local sun) which makes me wonder if it’s because I’ve raised one of those questions that is kinda unanswerable without exposing a deep flaw in the FE argument, or because I didn’t articulate it very well?

To repeat a little more clearly and concisely if I can: A local sun beaming down in a lamp-like fashion would light tall objects from the bottom to the top as it approaches them, not top to bottom, e.g. mountains, tall buildings etc. What we experience is top to bottom. As this video shows:



Also, we have all seen the undersides of clouds lit by the setting sun. Only possible on a globe.

Any thoughts?

Warm wishes and God bless.

Online iamcpc

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2019, 09:15:04 PM »
I see no-one has responded to my question, (above, re local sun) which makes me wonder if it’s because I’ve raised one of those questions that is kinda unanswerable without exposing a deep flaw in the FE argument, or because I didn’t articulate it very well?

To repeat a little more clearly and concisely if I can: A local sun beaming down in a lamp-like fashion would light tall objects from the bottom to the top as it approaches them, not top to bottom, e.g. mountains, tall buildings etc. What we experience is top to bottom. As this video shows:



Also, we have all seen the undersides of clouds lit by the setting sun. Only possible on a globe.

Any thoughts?

Warm wishes and God bless.

In your diagram on the video the sun is only omitting light downward. If the sun were omitting light in a circle then wouldn't that match the observation you are making?

The tops of the hills would be within the suns "circle" first therefore would be lit first.




Max_Almond

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2019, 08:36:35 AM »
FEW states that the Suns area of light is elliptical.  Why not circular unless the Sun is somehow shining down on the Earth from an angle with directed beam like a stage light?

It's only elliptical at certain times of the year: at other times it's shaped like a crescent, a 'D', and everything in between.

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2019, 11:54:29 AM »
FEW states that the Suns area of light is elliptical.  Why not circular unless the Sun is somehow shining down on the Earth from an angle with directed beam like a stage light?   For the light from the Sun to be confined to a specific area, like the lighthouse analogy that FEW suggests, then this would need some kind of reflector and director in order to send the light into a specific direction.
What happens to light when it is subject to constrictive reflection?

manicminer

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2019, 12:29:44 PM »
I've no idea.  I guess it would depend on what was causing the reflection and where the reflectors were in relation to the light source. How is that relevant to this anyway given that light from the Sun simply radiates outwards into space in all directions?

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Offline WellRoundedIndividual

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2019, 12:36:08 PM »
Please explain to me what constrictive reflection is. The only reference I can find is to philosophy and how one uses stereotypes constrict their self-image.

To my knowledge, there are only two types of reflection.  Diffuse and Specular.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 12:41:39 PM by WellRoundedIndividual »
BobLawBlah.

manicminer

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2019, 12:50:21 PM »
I will leave it to totallackey to explain fully what he means. Constrictive though means to squeeze, as in boa constrictor snakes. I have never heard of constriction though in the context of reflection so I'm a little perplexed about that as well.

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Offline WellRoundedIndividual

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Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2019, 12:52:59 PM »
I know what the two words mean separately.

I am a mechanical engineer. I took several physics classes in college. I never heard of constrictive reflection.
BobLawBlah.

manicminer

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2019, 01:11:13 PM »
Yes I have also done physics at college and university and as a term constrictive reflection is not something that I have heard of before. I can only guess it must be a kind of directed or focused reflection that only allows light rays to be reflected into a specific path.


I'm sure it all will become clear and obvious once we get the answer!



Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2019, 02:14:53 PM »
I see no-one has responded to my question, (above, re local sun) which makes me wonder if it’s because I’ve raised one of those questions that is kinda unanswerable without exposing a deep flaw in the FE argument, or because I didn’t articulate it very well?

To repeat a little more clearly and concisely if I can: A local sun beaming down in a lamp-like fashion would light tall objects from the bottom to the top as it approaches them, not top to bottom, e.g. mountains, tall buildings etc. What we experience is top to bottom. As this video shows:



Also, we have all seen the undersides of clouds lit by the setting sun. Only possible on a globe.

Any thoughts?

Warm wishes and God bless.

In your diagram on the video the sun is only omitting light downward. If the sun were omitting light in a circle then wouldn't that match the observation you are making?

The tops of the hills would be within the suns "circle" first therefore would be lit first.

The video shows light emitting downward to be in keeping with claims made by FEers. This argument is used to explain how the sun doesn’t light up the whole of a flat earth if the sun is local (within a few hundred or a few thousand miles of the surface of the flat earth).

To be clear, in keeping with that model, the sun would be emitting a beam of light (some are saying an ellipsis, others a circular beam) that would have a distinct edge on whatever it’s shining down upon. Imagine shining a torch down onto a table in a darkened room from a height of, say, 6 inches, with the torch held vertically, the light beam facing straight down. The circle of light on the table has an edge. If you move the torch one way the beam of light illuminates anything that is in its path. If it comes toward a tall structure, say a vase sitting on the table, the edge of the beam of light will touch the very base of the vase first. You can try this yourself - very easy to replicate.

The video show light hitting the very top of the mountain first, slowly moving downwards and illuminating the ground last.

The sun is visible 24 hours a day in the very far North in summertime, the same in the Southern Hemisphere in their summer, perfectly in keeping with the globe model. How does this work in the FE model?

I’ve heard that some people deny there is 24 daylight in summer in the Antarctic - because access to the Antarctic is difficult, some claim, no-one can check this out for themselves (not true btw, you can visit via cruise ship). The phenomena of a midnight sun is also true at the other pole. Well, my daughter happens to live in Norway, just below the Arctic circle. Currently (early Feb) daylight is from around 10am until 3 pm. In the summer the sun barely sets - just touches the horizon and rises again.

Hope this is clearer. Warm wishes and God bless.

manicminer

Re: Suns lit area of the flat Earth
« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2019, 02:50:31 PM »
Quote
The video shows light emitting downward to be in keeping with claims made by FEers. This argument is used to explain how the sun doesn’t light up the whole of a flat earth if the sun is local (within a few hundred or a few thousand miles of the surface of the flat earth).

Such an argument (excuse the punn) falls flat though because the Sun is not just a few hundred or thousand miles away it is 150 million km away.  That is a figure that has been measured in various ways. One such way was by determining the distance of Venus using radar and then working out the distance of the Sun by using trigonometry from the maximum elongation angle of Venus from the Sun. Other methods have been used since then and reached the same answer. The Sun > Earth distance is now a well established fact and as such it is used as a standard unit of distance measurement in astronomy as 1 astronomical unit.

The flat Earth community will I am sure dismiss all this with the usual claims that they always come up with.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 04:39:21 PM by manicminer »