*

Offline Tintagel

  • *
  • Posts: 531
  • Full of Tinier Tintagels
    • View Profile
Re: The Sun's rays, and how they prove me right
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2014, 03:06:53 AM »
The sun isn't ever anywhere near the horizon.
No, but the horizon is.  Sunlight travels from the sun, illuminates the horizon and travels to your eye.  So, are you suggesting that sunlight bends as it travels from the sun to the horizon, but travels straight from the horizon to your eye?

No, actually, light from the horizon drops first, and then bends upward.  See the second graphic with the trees.  This accounts for the "sinking ship" effect, and has a pesky tendency to make the earth look round.
???  Why would the light from the horizon drop at all?  Isn't the EA only supposed to cause an upward bending?

It does, but the acceleration of light (or, more accurately the jerk, or the rate at which its acceleration changes) happens at a different rate than the earth, so at first the earth "catches up" with the light that is traveling horizontally, like light from a tree, and then it accelerates faster and curves upward.  These are the calculations I'm working on, in fact, trying to determine not only the acceleration, but the jerk and impulse of EM radiation due to UA / DE.

*

Offline markjo

  • Purgatory
  • *
  • Posts: 3801
  • Zetetic Council runner-up
    • View Profile
Re: The Sun's rays, and how they prove me right
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2014, 04:55:07 PM »
Tintagel, are you familiar with the Michelson-Morley experiment?  If not, I suggest that you look in to it.  I think that you might find it relevant to your calculations.
Abandon hope all ye who press enter here.

Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.

If you can't demonstrate it, then you shouldn't believe it.

Re: The Sun's rays, and how they prove me right
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2014, 05:03:12 PM »
What is an example if something you can directly observe that is conclusive evidence for Electromagnetic Acceleration?

Well, sunsets for one.  The eye extrapolates the image of the sun back according to the angle at which the light enters the eye.  As the sun moves farther away, the angle of its light approaches horizontal, so it appears to sink into the horizon.

I'm also well aware that it's possible to infer a spherical earth from this observation, but as other experiments (including Hoppy's pictorial illustrating a house visible at over four miles across a flat, level expanse of water) have shown sufficiently that the earth's surface is flat, the EA interpretation is, in my opinion, the more valid one.

For the record hoppy's picture is based on incorrect assumptions such as the 12.9 ft drop that he posted with it. The drop is 4.75 because of the height of the camera.

Re: The Sun's rays, and how they prove me right
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2014, 01:47:00 AM »
The sun isn't ever anywhere near the horizon.
No, but the horizon is.  Sunlight travels from the sun, illuminates the horizon and travels to your eye.  So, are you suggesting that sunlight bends as it travels from the sun to the horizon, but travels straight from the horizon to your eye?

No, actually, light from the horizon drops first, and then bends upward.  See the second graphic with the trees.  This accounts for the "sinking ship" effect, and has a pesky tendency to make the earth look round.
???  Why would the light from the horizon drop at all?  Isn't the EA only supposed to cause an upward bending?

It does, but the acceleration of light (or, more accurately the jerk, or the rate at which its acceleration changes) happens at a different rate than the earth, so at first the earth "catches up" with the light that is traveling horizontally, like light from a tree, and then it accelerates faster and curves upward.  These are the calculations I'm working on, in fact, trying to determine not only the acceleration, but the jerk and impulse of EM radiation due to UA / DE.

I know this does not count as a perfectly credible source but the folks over at reddit have something to say about photon acceleration: http://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/comments/1der30/when_a_photon_is_emitted_from_an_stationary_atom/

Re: The Sun's rays, and how they prove me right
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2014, 08:13:31 AM »
One person's horizon is another's location, and so on round the world.