Offline tim

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Buoyancy ?
« on: November 27, 2018, 01:20:22 PM »
So to keep a long story short, I started watching Eric Dubay, and I havn't seen evidence to a round Earth myself. So I tried to brainstorm some repeatable/observable/somethingable (that he puts emphasis on) experiments.

He mentioned, in lieu of gravity, that buoyancy is a simpler explanation as to why we are stuck on the ground, ie. less dense than ground but more dense than air, keeping us between the two.

Now from life experiences, using still water as a medium, I know that denser objects sink faster than less dense objects. Using this as a parallel, I started to think that, when I use air as a medium, than more dense objects would fall faster than less dense objects.

So using a ping pong ball, die, baseball, tennisball, balled up sock. I began dropping them from an equivalent height (outstretched arms). I found quickly that my left hand is a bit slower than my right, so I had to start testing from both hands multiple times. After some time it seemed clear that regardless of the items density they landed approximately the same time, even the the ping pong ball and baseball (which i felt had the greatest density difference).

Now clearly my experiment needs to be cleaned up a bit, before i can even claim a result. But I should get a camera on the ground to see even small differences at a level perspective. And I need to remove human error somehow. I should also control the density, with some light plastic containers and just fill them with different amounts of water. Also maybe find some more elevation, so any small difference will be more exaggerated. Also controlling shapes would be good, to exclude different levels of air resistance. Maybe all the objects I have dropped are just at a similar magnitude of density greater than the medium that they fall at the same speed, even so, there should still be small differences.

More importantly I feel it's a simple and quick experiment that everyone can attempt. Thoughts? Suggestions?

MattyWS

Re: Buoyancy ?
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2018, 01:32:52 PM »
It's a great test and all but unless you can drop your items from a height that will ensure the objects reach terminal velocity you'll end up with things of different masses hitting the floor at the same time (assuming the different mass objects are the same shape). It's an experiment people have used to try to prove that the earth is moving upwards rather than gravity forcing things to fall toward earth and the results from a short height seem damning to gravity but it's pretty hard to test properly.

What you could do is get a friend who is heavier than you are and go sky diving, you'll find your more dense friend eventually falling faster than you. It's not a perfect experiment because you have other varying factors like the size and shape of you and your friend as well as your poses and wind/air conditions, but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be legal to drop stuff out of planes.

Another thing you could try is using balloons to take two objects with the same shape and different masses, attached to goPros, up at the same height and drop them at the same time using some kind of wireless control. If you do, make sure it's a clear day and you have a very large and open space to avoid hitting stuff. Go find the objects and watch the recordings to see how long they took to hit the ground from extreme heights in the same conditions. You'll find that the heavier mass object will hit the ground first. from a larger height.

EDIT: Also if you were referring to Eric Dubay's 200 proofs that the earth is not a ball, each of the 200 'proofs' can be debunked and a large amount of his points shows his lack of understanding of basic gravity and geometry. For example the very first 'proof' regarding the horizon being flat and not curving down at the sides would be the same if the world were spheroid or flat. If we lived on a cylinder maybe you'd see the horizon curving. I wont stray off topic but you should not be using him as a person of authority of knowledge. Maybe one day if I can be bothered I might go through all 200 and show reasons why they're wrong.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 01:50:18 PM by MattyWS »

Offline JCM

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Re: Buoyancy ?
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2018, 02:39:11 PM »
Here is an experiment showing gravity in action by removing that air in a giant vacuum.


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Offline markjo

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Re: Buoyancy ?
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2018, 02:52:33 PM »
Actually, Galileo discovered that a ramp can be quite useful in such acceleration experiments because it can slow the rate of acceleration to a rate that's much easier to time.
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Offline Pinky

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Re: Buoyancy ?
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2018, 01:28:18 PM »
So to keep a long story short, I started watching Eric Dubay, and I havn't seen evidence to a round Earth myself. So I tried to brainstorm some repeatable/observable/somethingable (that he puts emphasis on) experiments.

He mentioned, in lieu of gravity, that buoyancy is a simpler explanation as to why we are stuck on the ground, ie. less dense than ground but more dense than air, keeping us between the two.

Now from life experiences, using still water as a medium, I know that denser objects sink faster than less dense objects. Using this as a parallel, I started to think that, when I use air as a medium, than more dense objects would fall faster than less dense objects.

So using a ping pong ball, die, baseball, tennisball, balled up sock. I began dropping them from an equivalent height (outstretched arms). I found quickly that my left hand is a bit slower than my right, so I had to start testing from both hands multiple times. After some time it seemed clear that regardless of the items density they landed approximately the same time, even the the ping pong ball and baseball (which i felt had the greatest density difference).

Now clearly my experiment needs to be cleaned up a bit, before i can even claim a result. But I should get a camera on the ground to see even small differences at a level perspective. And I need to remove human error somehow. I should also control the density, with some light plastic containers and just fill them with different amounts of water. Also maybe find some more elevation, so any small difference will be more exaggerated. Also controlling shapes would be good, to exclude different levels of air resistance. Maybe all the objects I have dropped are just at a similar magnitude of density greater than the medium that they fall at the same speed, even so, there should still be small differences.

More importantly I feel it's a simple and quick experiment that everyone can attempt. Thoughts? Suggestions?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavendish_experiment

Gravity cannot be buoyancy because it also works sideways.