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Messages - ChrisTP

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1
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Now Playing (the Video Game Version)
« on: July 30, 2020, 10:01:43 PM »
Microsofts new Flight Sim coming up and will have VR support. I'll have my yoke and pedals ready (preordered). Nothing too special, a foldable playseat and the logitech flight sim yoke;

https://www.logitechg.com/en-gb/products/flight/flight-yoke-system-rudder-pedals-bundle.LOG-FLIGEU.html

The selling point about this game for me was the fact that it's using Bing maps to let you fly anywhere in the world with live feed of data from the real world, but VR has just topped it as a reason to play. It's on gamepass day one too... Win Win Win

2
I mean if god exists he's technically an extraterrestrial.

3
Right, In favor of less government/federal intervention in the lives of law abiding Americans, but think it's fine that a guy was pinned to the ground for dancing since dancing is so suspicious and we must be protected against people dancing.

Ok.
The guy wasn't pinned down for dancing in the street.

We went over that already.
What was he pinned down for then? Because as it happens they didn't have reason to do so and they're now receiving training after being placed on administrative leave and being investigated for their actions. Almost like they weren't trained well enough for the situation. It's a pretty clear cut case, he was detained for no real reason. the officers escalated a non-situation for no reason and for what? Because they had someone call the police about him dancing. Seems pretty clear cut to me, the officers were so far in the wrong that actions were taken against them. Strange that. Not sure why you're still defending officers for doing something stupid and clearly wrong. while claiming you think there should be less of that.

4
Right, In favor of less government/federal intervention in the lives of law abiding Americans, but think it's fine that a guy was pinned to the ground for dancing since dancing is so suspicious and we must be protected against people dancing.

Ok.

5
My take: it’s an optical illusion - the string experiment proves that. Yes, it looks like the string perpendicular to the terminator will shoot off into space but if you keep following the line you’ll see it doesn't.

Again, that "take" is erroneous. There are several ways to hold the string up to the Moon, to connect to points in the sky.


You can do that with any round object lit by a light source as long as you hold the string perpendicular to the terminator line, what matters is when you bring the string from one object to the light source to see if the perpendicular line is heading directly toward the light source, if it goes off past the light source at an angle you might have a point to make, but not letting the line meet or go past the light source seems like a purposeful diversion.

It's a cool optical illusion.

6
There you guys go, talking about Trump again. The argument "He's not trump" DOES NOT WORK. Even if you/the media successfully convince people that Trump is bad, that doesn't mean that they are voting for your side. They may not vote or vote for some other opposition. Trump character assassination was tried all through the last 2016 election cycle, and failed. You need to have a compelling and populous platform that people want and like.

Quickly, what was Hillary Clinton's main platform for presidency? It was "I'm a woman!" and some vague stuff about rising middle class incomes. Nothing compelling or organic that people were really excited about. On the other hand, Trump focused on illegal immigration problems and 'drain the swamp' and the like, and quickly became a populist figure, ultimately elected as President of the United States.

If you can't tell us how and why people are really exited about the Democrat's compelling platform, it's a lost cause. You are just hoping that people 'vote blue no matter who'. Continuing the ol' say-some-stuff-about-Trump-and-hope-people-vote-for-my-side tactic will not work.
But more importantly, yes, American police are out of control.

7
Technology & Information / Re: Should I become a console peasant?
« on: July 15, 2020, 10:57:43 AM »
The main issue and main advantage of consoles is that their specs are set in stone. The upside is that if you buy a game, it will work on your console. The downside is that if the game is computationally intensive, it will be forcibly gimped until it runs on the console. Some releases suffer from FPS drops even then. At least with PC you have the option to upgrade your components to keep on trucking.

Personally, I own a crapton of consoles for when I want the couch+controller experience (I could arrange that on PC, but I find consoles adequate for this purpose). I also have a PC for more "serious" gaming.

If you only want one machine, and money is not an issue, I'd be voting for PC as the superior option. But a console will work well enough, too, y'know?
I’m actually still kind of salty about this but my last pc was not bad spec wise, however when it came to upgrading hardware I found my motherboard was limited the components that were in there. That is to say, the motherboard limit for RAM was 64gb with a not great MHz speed and I had actually capped that limit with the best ram for it, and I already had the best cpu in there (that the motherboard could take) which meant any upgrades I wanted really needed a new motherboard and so the actual cost for upgrading RAM or CPU was more than a console. Though now I just future proofed by getting decent spec hardware that I know I can upgrade in the future... it was my own mistake for getting limited hardware to begin with but if after 5 years you end up having to replace all the parts to a pc just to keep it relevant for gaming you may end up being better off with a console.

Though my pc is also used for development so I tend to spec it out for that rather than playing games, it’s just a happy coincidence it’s also a gaming rig. Still, super salty about effectively having to buy a new computer to upgrade.

Anyway the specs for the new consoles are actually decent and there is a strong focus for 60fps gameplay which is nice. 30fps games were dark times

8
Technology & Information / Re: Should I become a console peasant?
« on: July 14, 2020, 06:54:01 PM »
Ps5 IMO is the console worth getting, but they're mostly the same. The thing about xbox is if you have a reasonable windows pc, all exclusives for xbox will be on there too. Ps5 not only holds exclusives (at least for now, until they form some kind of deal with Epic Games) but actually is the more efficient console. That said, I have a powerhouse pc for work which can play any game on max settings and I'll still be getting a ps5 and maybe a nextbox just because I like having the choice. No reason not to have them all unless you're poor. With playstation you get the cool titles like Uncharted, Last of us, gran turismo (fuck forza it's not worth it). You got a pc it's as good as having an xbox. Though I prefer my shooters with a mouse and keyboard...

So in short, PC for RTS and FPS games, xbox if you have money to waste, ps5 if you want a console worth having for platformers and racing games and stuff, or just anything you would use a controller for. Get 'em all!

9
That seems weird.
Weird enough to detain me?

Anyway my response wasn't to say normal things aren't normal. I said weird things happen. My response which you seem to be missing the point of is that I bring into question why a weird but harmless and legal activity are cause for phoning the police which ya know, lets assume the person who called the police was actually calling for a legit concern, the police who arrived should have been able to sus out what was going on pretty much in seconds. You seem to be having an equally hard time with this as the police seemed to... You don't detain people for dancing. That's moronic. You also glossed over my question regarding gender/race reversal. Would the situation have been the same if it were a blond white female acting the same way? You don't have to answer here but if your answer is no and you still can't see the problem then you are also the problem.

10
I don't know where all the people here live who are talking about how it's perfectly normal and not at all unusual for people to be dancing in the street. I've never seen that happen outside of a musical. I also question how confidently it's been asserted that it's entirely legal to dance in the streets. Really? The government doesn't have anything to say about people dancing on a public road that's regularly traversed by cars? I doubt there's any statute specifically about dancing, but there's a very strong argument to be made that it could constitute reckless behavior, or cause accidents. Also, the police don't need probable cause to detain someone, just reasonable suspicion, and while I personally wouldn't go calling the cops over someone dancing in the street, that's absolutely enough to detain someone for the course of an investigation. To keep boiling it down to "arrested for dancing," as if literally the first thing the police did is snap on the handcuffs, is disingenuous. I can't read the police's minds, and I can't say for a certainty that if this dude had cooperated that everything would have been fine, but as it stands, the video shows someone who has been clearly informed that he's being detained trying to leave, and so he's arrested. The police need to have the power to enforce laws, even laws against minor infractions, or we might as well not have these laws at all.
I'd say it's no more dangerous than kids playing in the street which happens on a daily basis, or people going for a jog will sometimes jog on the road in a place where there is not much traffic, which seems to be the case here.

I'm just wondering at what point people realise that "being different" in harmless ways is considered worthy of calling the cops in for an investigation. Had the person been say, a white blond female of the same age dancing in the street do you think the police would have been called? And more so do you think she'd have been pinned to the ground for not taking her non-existent crime seriously? And again, police who are trained to deescalate somehow escalated the situation of a guy dancing to detaining him which is fucking stupid. You show up, see the guy is just excising in unusual ways and some moron overreacted by calling the police, you move on. There was no reason for that situation to get out of hand especially when neighbours were chiming in to say they know him and it's what he does regularly. It's like they had no common sense to go "ah ok sorry we fucked up" at any point. They instead doubled down at every turn.

People are weird. I see weird people doing weird shit in the streets all the time. Kids play in the street, joggers jog in the street... No problem. Middle aged man dancing in the street is not worthy of calling the police let alone how badly that situation was handled by trained officers.

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Any normal person wouldn't be dancing in the street.
Well first off this is obviously not true since the guy the police detained was seemingly normal when the police approached him and most of his neighbours seemed to think it was his normal routine. But lets brush aside that you think being abnormal is somehow suspicious for a moment.

Why would you detain someone for dancing? Why is it ok to dance for exercise in a gym or at home but not outside in public? What about street parties where people are dancing? Why were the police, who are trained to deescalate, escalate the situation to the point of detaining someone for dancing? They arrived on the scene, could see the guy was clearly in workout clothing, his neighbours even came out to say it's all cool and it's normal and they know him, he's not doing any harm but they carried on? Totallackey, if you were an officer in that situation how would it go down? Would you overreact to someone dancing? Because it seems since you're defending their actions that you too would have acted the same way. If so, why would you take offense or feel threatened, or why would you think dancing is going to be cause for harm or lead to any crime? Or would you act on impulse at your hurt feelings that the guy is just different to you and there's nothing you could do about it?

You would not be fun at parties. Imagine trying to defend the police officers pinning people down for dancing... At this point you have to be trolling yet again.

12
black man was arrested for dancing in the street... Wut. Why would it escalate to that point? Police are supposed to be trained to deescalate. I understand they have to investigate when someone calls them but... Cops arrive, ask the guy if everything is all good, guy says year just doing my morning routine. Cops at that point should have just stopped bothering him but instead went into restraining him, which is ridiculous. And having to have neighbours come out and vouch for you to the police is also ridiculous because he was doing nothing wrong... It's a completely bizarre exchange between the police and the guy.
 


13
Technology & Information / Re: Dell TechDirect
« on: June 30, 2020, 07:50:44 PM »
Just finished my first Dell TechDirect self-help dispatch ticket.

Had to replace a motherboard on an in-warranty Latitude 5490. With Dell TechDirect, I was able to login to a portal, create a ticket with a brief description of the issue and troubleshooting steps, then select the part I needed. A few days later, the board arrived, with a return shipping label for the defective board. Very slick. Didn't have to call Dell or talk to a single tech rep, it was awesome!

Yeah, I loved that about Dell self repair.  Lenovo has something similar but it's much harder to get.  We just do the self ticket and they send a 3rd party repair guy to fix it.

Ah, wonder if they'll have some incentive to ditch the repair guy and let people do it themselves now that they risk COVID infection by doing house-calls.
I don't know, there's always a market for the totally tech illiterate that won't want to even try to understand (my sister is one of those self defeating people).

14
Lol... Just because I don't live in america doesn't mean I've never been to america or seen anything to do with american law enforcement. This a really strange opinion for you to have, given that it would mean you can't have an opinion on literally anything unless it's something related directly to yourself.
I didn't write you couldn't have an opinion.

I wrote your opinion is worth no consideration by others unless presented within a framework.
Just the other day you used LiverpoolFC as an example for how English people and the English police force act. I guess that point of yours is void? Since you don't live in the UK and aren't a footballer or a UK police officer or football hooligan in Liverpool? Of course not, you can still have an outside view of something.
All correct.
You can still see stuff happening via media or first hand experience when going on holidays. I don't have to be living in the US to see that some US officers are breaking the law or discriminating against race. I don't need to have been there at the time of an incident to see that there was an incident when there's video footage of an incident. There's documented evidence of that stuff for me to see. Just like everyone else in this thread that isn't from the US, I can have a viewpoint of the US. In fact people all around the globe has an opinion about the US.
All worthless, unless discussed within the framework of experience and correlation.

And like I wrote earlier, that type of discussion would bankrupt your position.
Yea sorry this isn't how it works.
That is exactly how it works.
You don't know what experiences I've had, you've no idea what I've learned through life. not being in the US doesn't "bankrupt" my position.
You are correct.

I do not know your experience.

I didn't write what you have stated I wrote.

It is not the idea of you having never been or even having been to the US which bankrupts your position.

It is your lack of framework provided for interpretation of whatever experience you have had. applied to the subject matter at hand, which bankrupts your position.

That, and of course which you so clearly demonstrate here, a decided lack of understanding.
Which btw, is that most officers are sound and only a few bad apples that get a lot of media coverage ruin it for the rest.
There is some semblance of a framework offered here, but it certainly isn't your entire position.

And I agree with what you wrote, except it doesn't ruin it for the rest.

Too broad a brush.

The people chosen for the police come from society, just like every other occupation.

As far as the rest of it, discipline has and is being taken.

You act like it hasn't.
Ok well I'll remember this the next time you chime in to a topic about rockets with your absolute lack of experience in rocket science or engineering. Worthless indeed.

Yes what I wrote is a broad description. I guess you can round it down to the fact that there are any bad apples at all should not be possible. Police enforcing the law should be lawful. Some aren't and that is not acceptable. Some get found out and disciplined sure, but

A) Why were they able to become an officer in the first place and
B) What about all the ones that haven't been found out yet?

Don't get me wrong, I don't expect every officer to have gone through law school and be the perfect specimen of human, no one is perfect, but you can find footage of some absolute moronic police officers and that shouldn't be possible. You don't need to have experienced it for yourself to see that. How can someone uphold the law while not being lawful? Why were they given such a position? How were they able to keep that position for years? How can I expect the police to protect and serve citizens if there's potentially morons with big egos in the force? These are questions I think desperately need to be answered and corrected in future. It should be progress at least ie; something needs to change.

15
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Black Lives Matter
« on: June 30, 2020, 07:35:29 PM »
To add on to Tim’s point about the continuation of racism, the economic conditions that many systemically oppressed black people found themselves in are inherited today as well.
Thomas Sowell proves your stated position is devoid of substance.

Lifestyle choice is not systemic.

You are correct, and I would agree with you except for the fact that it wasn't their choice to live in impoverished locations, with low resources.
Yes, it is.

There are no laws keeping people from living where they want.
It wasn't their choice to be forced to accepting low-paying, low-class jobs.
Yes, it is.

There are no laws prohibiting people from applying for any job they want.
It wasn't their choice that dealing drugs and prostitution was the most sustainable way to live - yes it was their choice to participate, but it was not their choice that it was the most profitable way to survive.
Dealing drugs and engaging in prostitution is certainly a lifestyle choice.

Where did I claim that cost of items is a lifestyle choice?
In fact, if you study inner-city marginalization, you find that many drug dealers attempted to get out of that business and "go legit". Struggling to survive on a legit income is much harder if you are black, poor, and marginalized. <- none of those things are anyone's choice.
Horseshit.

Absolutely no economic data to support this at all.
So, I'm not sure why you call these "lifestyle choices" because nobody chooses their skin color, nobody chooses there they are born, and nobody chooses what socio-economic class they are in from birth.
Your entire post is simply a fake mantra.

Read Thomas Sowell and take it up with him.

I'll take the word of a black professor over yours any day of the week.

Yeah, that was a racist thing to write, so sue me.
I get what you're saying regarding the laws not stopping anyone from doing what they want to do. It's not the law that's preventing holding them back. Poor towns, poor cities, poor countries even, they don't choose to be poor. With poverty comes limited options of survival so if I'm struggling to feed my children and I were desperate enough to go out and steal some bikes or something to put food on the table why not? and this mindset and lifestyle is handed down. If you live in that kind of society all your life you're more likely to keep living that way. In a sense you could say that the only thing holding people back now is themselves and that would be true if it weren't also for the general racism they receive too. It's a complicated subject and not just black and white obviously, but it's not just the law keeping people living like that. People that are wealthy already are likely to have wealthy kids. that grow up making more money and staying wealthy. When you have that wealth to begin with you are in a far better position to stay wealthy. This isn't really something anyone can deny and to be fair, no one would complain about it if they were the ones living on the wealthy side of life.

Since the law isn't stopping you Totallackey, why aren't you a millionaire living a totally legit/lawful lifestyle? Did you choose not to be rich?

16
Lol... Just because I don't live in america doesn't mean I've never been to america or seen anything to do with american law enforcement. This a really strange opinion for you to have, given that it would mean you can't have an opinion on literally anything unless it's something related directly to yourself.
I didn't write you couldn't have an opinion.

I wrote your opinion is worth no consideration by others unless presented within a framework.
Just the other day you used LiverpoolFC as an example for how English people and the English police force act. I guess that point of yours is void? Since you don't live in the UK and aren't a footballer or a UK police officer or football hooligan in Liverpool? Of course not, you can still have an outside view of something.
All correct.
You can still see stuff happening via media or first hand experience when going on holidays. I don't have to be living in the US to see that some US officers are breaking the law or discriminating against race. I don't need to have been there at the time of an incident to see that there was an incident when there's video footage of an incident. There's documented evidence of that stuff for me to see. Just like everyone else in this thread that isn't from the US, I can have a viewpoint of the US. In fact people all around the globe has an opinion about the US.
All worthless, unless discussed within the framework of experience and correlation.

And like I wrote earlier, that type of discussion would bankrupt your position.
Yea sorry this isn't how it works. You don't know what experiences I've had, you've no idea what I've learned through life. not being in the US doesn't "bankrupt" my position. Which btw, is that most officers are sound and only a few bad apples that get a lot of media coverage ruin it for the rest. but IMO Those bad apples shouldn't have made it to their position. So I guess I'd question the education system of the US and the training that police officers receive. when I've seen evidence of those bad apples existing, my point still stands I believe. I don't have an extreme position which I get the feeling you think I do. I just think potential officers should go through more of a trial and better training. I think anyone showing red flags of having a massive ego shouldn't be an officer. I think any officer shown to be abusing their position or breaking the law themselves should be stripped of their position.

Not everyone is cut out to be a law enforcement officer, I know I wouldn't be, so I have nothing against people that do that stuff for a living but I can visibly see some of them aren't capable and shouldn't be an officer. There are cultural differences that make the US and UK police really quite different for sure, but that doesn't mean I don't have any insight into the US police force, especially since the US is under a microscope most of the time.

17
Quote
I find it hard to believe you are so quick to accept the word of another regarding racial injustice, having experienced none yourself.
What makes you say that? What a strange stance since you've seen literally 0% of my life experiences and you've no idea what I look like or what my background is. I've certainly had people discriminate me based on race and gender (in fact it's the trendy thing to do at universities by 'woke' students at the moment). I've experienced injustice, even if it's not to the degree of getting shot at by police. Regardless, it's pretty obvious based on the vast amounts of evidence that racism exists and it goes both ways, but one way has been more extreme. Hell I've had people pull the race card on me even though I'd consider myself rather of accepting (or rather I don't give a shit) of peoples race so it's not to say people don't randomly pull the race card at every chance because some do. If racism didn't exist people wouldn't think to pull a race card though.
This is laughable.

In the very first question I asked you about injustices and you provided no background whatsoever, demonstrating you are not even interested in a serious discussion, further evidenced by ignoring the actual question.
Because we aren't here to discuss my personal injustices, we're here to talk about whether or not the US police force are competent. This has nothing to do with my life here in the UK. I'm not going to tell you my life story when it has no relevance to the topic (and is really my business whether I share information about my life).
If you have no experience with the American police or forms of injustice then you really have no worthwhile insight in the topic at all.

Neither does Tumeni.

You are incapable of even drawing correlation between any of your experiences and that of persons involved with the American system.

Even offering you the benefit of doubt when it comes to such a function, you do not want to discuss it within this most worthwhile framework due to its exposition demonstrating the bankruptcy of your overall message.
Lol... Just because I don't live in america doesn't mean I've never been to america or seen anything to do with american law enforcement. This a really strange opinion for you to have, given that it would mean you can't have an opinion on literally anything unless it's something related directly to yourself.

Just the other day you used LiverpoolFC as an example for how English people and the English police force act. I guess that point of yours is void? Since you don't live in the UK and aren't a footballer or a UK police officer or football hooligan in Liverpool? Of course not, you can still have an outside view of something. You can still see stuff happening via media or first hand experience when going on holidays. I don't have to be living in the US to see that some US officers are breaking the law or discriminating against race. I don't need to have been there at the time of an incident to see that there was an incident when there's video footage of an incident. There's documented evidence of that stuff for me to see. Just like everyone else in this thread that isn't from the US, I can have a viewpoint of the US. In fact people all around the globe has an opinion about the US.

18
Quote
I find it hard to believe you are so quick to accept the word of another regarding racial injustice, having experienced none yourself.
What makes you say that? What a strange stance since you've seen literally 0% of my life experiences and you've no idea what I look like or what my background is. I've certainly had people discriminate me based on race and gender (in fact it's the trendy thing to do at universities by 'woke' students at the moment). I've experienced injustice, even if it's not to the degree of getting shot at by police. Regardless, it's pretty obvious based on the vast amounts of evidence that racism exists and it goes both ways, but one way has been more extreme. Hell I've had people pull the race card on me even though I'd consider myself rather of accepting (or rather I don't give a shit) of peoples race so it's not to say people don't randomly pull the race card at every chance because some do. If racism didn't exist people wouldn't think to pull a race card though.
This is laughable.

In the very first question I asked you about injustices and you provided no background whatsoever, demonstrating you are not even interested in a serious discussion, further evidenced by ignoring the actual question.
Because we aren't here to discuss my personal injustices, we're here to talk about whether or not the US police force are competent. This has nothing to do with my life here in the UK. I'm not going to tell you my life story when it has no relevance to the topic (and is really my business whether I share information about my life).

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Quote
I find it hard to believe you are so quick to accept the word of another regarding racial injustice, having experienced none yourself.
What makes you say that? What a strange stance since you've seen literally 0% of my life experiences and you've no idea what I look like or what my background is. I've certainly had people discriminate me based on race and gender (in fact it's the trendy thing to do at universities by 'woke' students at the moment). I've experienced injustice, even if it's not to the degree of getting shot at by police. Regardless, it's pretty obvious based on the vast amounts of evidence that racism exists and it goes both ways, but one way has been more extreme. Hell I've had people pull the race card on me even though I'd consider myself rather of accepting (or rather I don't give a shit) of peoples race so it's not to say people don't randomly pull the race card at every chance because some do. If racism didn't exist people wouldn't think to pull a race card though.

20
Just like minorities get trained to pull the race card every time they want to do what they want to do without logical consequence.

Now that's an interesting claim.

Let's say this is true.... who's training them to pull the race card?
Life.
Yes I imagine a life full of racism would train them to point out racism toward them.
Why do you have such an easy time ignoring the injustice of others directed at you?

I know why I do.
I'm not sure I fully understand your question, can you explain? I don't think I'm ignoring any injustice and I'm not entirely sure what you mean by 'injustice of others directed at me'. Which injustice, at who others and how is any of that directed at me?

You say people are trained by life to pull the race card, I agree with you, a lifetime full of racism toward a person would make them quicker to point out racism toward them. I'm fully acknowledging the injustice of racial discrimination.

If you know why you have an easy time ignoring racial discrimination and injustice by all means tell us.

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