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Messages - Parsifal

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1
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Star Citizen
« on: Today at 02:49:49 PM »
What's it the anniversary of? The game's announcement, its beta release?

It's the anniversary of the end of the initial Kickstarter campaign, in November 2012. There is no beta yet, only an alpha.

2
Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Session problems on the Wiki
« on: December 08, 2019, 12:08:56 AM »
This should hopefully be better now. Please post here if you still notice problems.

3
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: December 03, 2019, 08:24:58 PM »
I'm so glad Thork isn't my uncle.

I'm not the uncle he has to worry about. My brother, 'Big Mike', is far more frightening.

As I'm sure you know from experience.

4
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: December 03, 2019, 06:12:25 PM »
I'm so glad Thork isn't my uncle.

5
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: December 02, 2019, 11:16:43 AM »
His comment still holds. In fact, it holds today more so than it did in 2006. Your options are 2.4GHz bands, which are almost universally congested; and 5GHz which hates walls and doors - those things that houses have.

Theoretically, sure. My direct experience is that this rarely matters for reliability.

It can add latency, which is a valid reason to prefer a wired network, but I've almost never had problems with Wi-Fi reliability in the past couple of years that weren't caused by bugs in my Wi-Fi driver. I've more often had my uplink be unreliable than my Wi-Fi connection.

A good CAT5e/CAT6 run trumps all

That depends heavily on a lot of factors. Since this is a desktop, mobility is likely a non-issue here, but there's still the question of whether this is a rented property (in which case running cables inside the walls is likely a non-starter) and how far from the router the kid's room is (running a cable the length of the house for one PC is probably not worth the hassle).

In an ideal world, every house would have an RJ45 port or two wired up with every electrical socket. In reality, a Wi-Fi repeater is often just as reliable as a wired connection (or at the very least, more reliable than the ISP it connects you to) and far simpler and more flexible to set up and maintain.

6
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: December 02, 2019, 10:46:26 AM »
Ethernet cable is cheaper and far more reliable than a wifi adapter.

Did you last use Wi-Fi in 2006?

7
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Star Citizen
« on: November 30, 2019, 11:05:05 PM »
Imagine spending $3000 on a computer game.

I see you still haven't figured out how much Rushy has paid for this game.

8
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Star Citizen
« on: November 30, 2019, 07:10:44 PM »
Chris Roberts made more money in the past week selling pictures of virtual spacecraft than the entire FES' yearly salaries combined. For posterity, none of the ships below are actually in the game right now. Stock numbers are hidden now, so I can only go by previous years. Therefore Roberts sold: approximately 400 Javelins, 2000 Idris' and 800 Krakens. And that's just the warbond (cash only) ships. He sold even more credit versions, which can be 0% "new money" or 100% "new money". The credit versions can be bought with 80% store credit and 20% new money. The "warbond" versions cannot be bought with store credit and therefore 100% of their sales add funding to the game.

I'm still not giving him $20 for the Pisces upgrade. Small victory, but still.

9
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 30, 2019, 11:05:08 AM »
https://www.wepc.com/tips/ssd-cache/

Not every intel but several.  Maybe even yours, parsifal.

I just pre-emptively responded to this with an edit in my last post:

(Strictly speaking, Intel Rapid Storage Technology was available in 2017, but was (and perhaps still is) limited to using 64 GB of the SSD as a cache. I don't consider that at all useful for a gaming PC given that there are now individual games larger than 64 GB on the market.)

10
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 30, 2019, 10:58:10 AM »
And I'm explaining to you, repeatedly, that your point does not apply to reality. You will not find modern hardware that can run Windows, meets the requirements for SSD caching in general (inb4 wHaT iF yOu dOn'T hAvE aN sSd!!!), and which won't support SSD caching in Windows out of the box.

This definitely was not the case when I looked into it not very long ago, otherwise I would be using it on the gaming laptop I bought in 2017, which has both an SSD and an HDD. I'm willing to accept that things have changed since then (I don't use Windows very much so I don't follow its development closely), but then it seems like AMD providing this functionality for their hardware is pointless.

(Strictly speaking, Intel Rapid Storage Technology was available in 2017, but was (and perhaps still is) limited to using 64 GB of the SSD as a cache. I don't consider that at all useful for a gaming PC given that there are now individual games larger than 64 GB on the market.)

11
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 30, 2019, 02:01:46 AM »
The software that automatically installs with Windows, and which comes pre-installed at OEM stage works with your machine. If you choose to do something else, you do so at your own behest, and it is assumed that you know what you're doing. There is no functional difference.

Adding [b] doesn't make you any more correct.

Installing software on your computer comes after you've chosen your hardware, which is the step at which you decide what storage you want and how you're going to manage it. You're correct in that if you choose your hardware carefully with Windows, you get the behaviour you want. That is also my point.

12
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 29, 2019, 08:32:58 PM »
Plenty of third parties have solutions for this. Your preference for the "OS vendor" (oftentimes a loosely organised group of enthusiasts) being responsible for all the things is just that - a preference with no functional difference. A loosely organised collective of megacorps is doing the exact same thing, except they don't slap a singular badge on it.

There is a very clear functional difference, and that is whether the implementation works with all supported hardware or a subset of it. AMD's implementation of this requires that you use AMD hardware. Linux's implementation works on any hardware, even non-x86.

13
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 29, 2019, 12:01:52 PM »
Yeah, AMD has tiered storage nailed down. Another reason to pick Ryzen at the moment.

Only when buying from a lazy OS vendor that sits back and lets hardware vendors do their work for them. It doesn't matter who you buy your CPU from when your OS is implemented by your OS vendor.

I've used up over 3TB of data on my computer.  Trimmed a bunch to make space but ... Yeah.

So have I. My point is that when using this amount of data, an extra 500 GB SSD is unlikely to make much difference long-term because you likely also have high growth. In other words, you need a bigger HDD anyway.

If you have a use case for storing an amount of data between 3 TB and 3.5 TB that can't be reduced to under 3 TB and will never grow above 3.5 TB, I'd love to hear it.

14
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 28, 2019, 11:12:49 PM »
So you lose storage space(size of the HDD, not HDD + SSD) to gain a fast autocache?  Meh, doesn't seem worth it to me.

Are you telling me you would fill up a 3 TB HDD and need that extra half a TB?

https://www.amd.com/en/technologies/store-mi

I admit I didn't know about this. Good to see AMD doing Microsoft's job of developing basic OS functionality for them.

15
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 28, 2019, 09:20:07 PM »
Why would you want Linux to just shuffle around your program locations automatically?  Yes, I know the file system is all one big linked thing but surely you don't want to find out that your ssd got full because your OS thought you wanted your favorite game on your ssd instead of your hdd?

And how does it manage such a cache?  What makes it decide to move program X to your ssd vs keeping it where you put it?

The answer to both of these is the same.

It's a block-level cache. It doesn't decide where to put files or games, it decides where to put blocks, the small bits of data that make up files. If it puts a block into the cache, it evicts an old block that hasn't been used in a while. The cache can't "get full".

From the user's point of view, the SSD and HDD appear together as one filesystem, with the size of the HDD. The SSD just caches things from the HDD that get used often. It can't override where you "put" something because you can't choose which physical device to put it on. You put it on the virtual device and let the OS handle the rest.

Welcome to logical volume management, the great innovation of the '00s.

16
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 28, 2019, 07:13:04 PM »
1) Its a gaming computer. You'd have to be deranged to give a 12 year old a Linux gaming computer. Gaming ... windows ... job done.

Steam has very good Linux support these days, especially with Proton.

2) Its his first proper computer. I don't want him staring at a command line all confused and angry.

Did you last use Linux in 1995?

3) He can install junk operating systems himself if he wants. I'm not going to force Linux on him. Stop being a fascist.

hot take

4) Whats the point of having an nvme drive? Or are you asking why I don't just put in a 4tb nvme? Both these questions are stupid.

I'm asking why you don't install an OS that can make full use of the hardware. Linux can use the SSD as a cache so that your most frequently used games automatically go onto the SSD, no manual file management needed. With Windows he will be constantly copying games between the SSD and the HDD as he gets bored with some games and starts installing others.

17
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 28, 2019, 08:26:07 AM »
What would a 12 year old use 3TB of storage for?

Moreover, what's the point of having both an SSD and an HDD with an OS so crippled it can't even use the SSD as a simple cache? At least give him Linux.

18
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 27, 2019, 10:07:48 PM »

19
Technology & Information / Re: Nephew's Computer
« on: November 27, 2019, 09:51:03 PM »
Radeon 5700

You may want to be a little more specific, unless you're seriously planning on buying him a 10-year-old graphics card.

20
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Star Citizen
« on: November 25, 2019, 10:21:03 PM »
It reads as though you are happy to wait 6 years for level 2 to be added to the game.

Star Citizen is not a game, it is a multi-user virtual environment. It doesn't have points or scores, it doesn't have winners or losers.

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