The Flat Earth Society

Flat Earth Discussion Boards => Flat Earth Theory => Topic started by: DaveP on January 13, 2020, 09:55:25 AM

Title: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: DaveP on January 13, 2020, 09:55:25 AM
So after reading the wiki, I don’t understand a few things.

If the anti moon is only around in the day, and lunar eclipses are only seen in the night. How can lunar eclipses work?

Wouldn’t the sun always be between the moon and the anti moon?
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: Pete Svarrior on January 13, 2020, 10:43:31 AM
If the anti moon is only around in the day
???
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: DaveP on January 13, 2020, 02:12:12 PM
Per the Wiki

Quote
The shadow object is never seen in the sky because it orbits the sun on the day side of the earth,

However lunar eclipses always occur during night, or the night side of the earth to use your termiology.

This gives the following alignment according to your model
Antimoon (day side)
Sun
Moon (night side)

However the correct alignment to produce lunar eclipse would be

Sun
Anti Moon (night side)
Moon (night side)

So your model seems to be flawed.

Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: Pete Svarrior on January 13, 2020, 03:07:02 PM
However the correct alignment to produce lunar eclipse would be

Sun
Anti Moon (night side)
Moon (night side)
This is incorrect. All that needs to be visible from the night side is the antimoon's shadow.
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: DaveP on January 13, 2020, 03:54:22 PM
However the correct alignment to produce lunar eclipse would be

Sun
Anti Moon (night side)
Moon (night side)
This is incorrect. All that needs to be visible from the night side is the antimoon's shadow.

This isn’t entirely correct. Specifically the  shadow of the anti moon needs to be seen on the moon. Since the anti moon is on the other side of the sun. The shadow points away from the moon.
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: Pete Svarrior on January 13, 2020, 04:09:17 PM
Specifically the  shadow of the anti moon needs to be seen on the moon.
Yes. Do we need to state every obvious detail?

Since the anti moon is on the other side of the sun.
This is obviously not the case during a lunar eclipse. It's perfectly possible for the Sun and antimoon to be located far from the observer (i.e. the observer experiences night), and for the antimoon's shadow to eclipse the Moon.
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: DaveP on January 13, 2020, 04:38:30 PM
This doesn’t seem to be geometrically possible. Can you provide a sketch which would illustrate the angles?
Title: Re: Lunar Eclipses
Post by: AllAroundTheWorld on January 13, 2020, 06:45:12 PM
There’s two explanations on the Wiki for lunar phases, one saying if the moon and sun are at the same height then there’s a half moon, and another explanation involving EA. These explanations seem to contradict each other.

And one thing I really don’t understand is how everyone on the night side of the earth would see the same moon phase from all the different angles they’re seeing the moon from.

Is there any evidence for the anti-moon existing, other than that lunar eclipses occur. It feels like another ad-hoc explanation used to explain an observed phenomenon rather than something there is empirical evidence for.