The Flat Earth Society

Other Discussion Boards => Science & Alternative Science => Topic started by: Quantum Flare on April 17, 2019, 03:58:03 PM

Title: Solar Eclipes
Post by: Quantum Flare on April 17, 2019, 03:58:03 PM
How would these work on a flat earth if the sun and moon are level with each other and are moved by the aetheric whirlpool (this is what I've heard).
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: Quantum Flare on April 17, 2019, 03:59:31 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s to simulate gravity? Thanks.
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: junker on April 17, 2019, 04:01:21 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: QED on April 18, 2019, 03:34:56 AM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.

Hmm, true - but lift requires a pressure gradient. How can one achieve a pressure gradient if all air is moving upwards at the same acceleration?
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: Science Supporter on April 18, 2019, 03:42:54 AM
How would these work on a flat earth if the sun and moon are level with each other and are moved by the aetheric whirlpool (this is what I've heard).
The FE Wiki claims that the New Moon occurs when the moon is below the Sun's altitude of the orbit. So that causes a solar eclipse according to them but there's still some controversy between how lunar phases work. Even Tom admitted they don't know much about this, as he said, "Not much is known about the celestial bodies and there differences".
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: markjo on April 18, 2019, 01:15:37 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.

Hmm, true - but lift requires a pressure gradient.
Umm...  No.  Lift requires a pressure differential between the top surface of the airfoil and the bottom surface.  This is usually achieved by one or both of those surfaces being curved as it moves through the airstream.
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: QED on April 18, 2019, 06:12:41 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.

Hmm, true - but lift requires a pressure gradient.
Umm...  No.  Lift requires a pressure differential between the top surface of the airfoil and the bottom surface.  This is usually achieved by one or both of those surfaces being curved as it moves through the airstream.

What then, if you don’t mind me asking, is the difference between a pressure differential and a pressure gradient?
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: stack on April 18, 2019, 07:40:31 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.

Hmm, true - but lift requires a pressure gradient.
Umm...  No.  Lift requires a pressure differential between the top surface of the airfoil and the bottom surface.  This is usually achieved by one or both of those surfaces being curved as it moves through the airstream.

What then, if you don’t mind me asking, is the difference between a pressure differential and a pressure gradient?

Wouldn't a pressure differential/pressure gradient, or lack thereof, be the reason why a helicopter can't rise to land on top of Everest?
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: WellRoundedIndividual on April 18, 2019, 07:54:48 PM
Everyone is partially correct. A slight misunderstanding of aerodynamics and how lift is actually created. For lift to be created there must be a) motion - either a solid object moving through a gas, or gas flowing over a solid object (in most cases, we would think of a wing being the solid object here), b) there must be a medium (a fluid or a gas) in which the solid object is moving through or being passed.  It does not require a pressure gradient to exist already. Lift creates a pressure gradient.  Atmospheric pressure gradients do not create lift. Does this clear up any confusion?
Title: Re: Solar Eclipes
Post by: QED on April 18, 2019, 09:42:10 PM
Also, how do airplanes fly if the earth is moving upward at 9.8m/s [sic] to simulate gravity? Thanks.

Lift.

Hmm, true - but lift requires a pressure gradient.
Umm...  No.  Lift requires a pressure differential between the top surface of the airfoil and the bottom surface.  This is usually achieved by one or both of those surfaces being curved as it moves through the airstream.

What then, if you don’t mind me asking, is the difference between a pressure differential and a pressure gradient?

Wouldn't a pressure differential/pressure gradient, or lack thereof, be the reason why a helicopter can't rise to land on top of Everest?

It’s related. The way a helicopter creates lift is by pushing air downwards using the design of the rotating propellor. It must push enough air down to counteract the gravitational force. At high altitudes, there is just not enough density to beat gravity. So it’s more a Newton’s third law issue than a pressure gradient one. But pressure is involved.