Brett500

Azimuth angles?
« on: December 02, 2021, 07:47:04 PM »
Has anyone on here looked at the azimuth angles of the sun ( the point where the sun rises and sets on the horizon measured from true north.)
If you look up an azimuth chart for your location it will show where you will see the sun rise/set. The angles are always even if it rises 60° from North, it sets at 300° .
So what you may say but if we are on a globe that is tilted at 23.4° to the ecliptic and the north pole always points in the same direction, then the only time the sun rise/set should be even would be at mid winter and mid summer when the axis would be perpendicular to the ecliptic. At any other point they should be affected by the globe angle.

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2021, 09:16:00 PM »
No expert in this arena, but go to Suncalc.org.  Look at any location and set the time for sunrise/sunset and you'll see the actual azimuth.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2021, 03:13:27 PM »
I've looked at many azimuth charts for various latitudes and the common factor is that the rising/set angle are even all year.
That's an impossibility if the earth has an inclined angle of 23.4° to the ecliptic.

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Offline stack

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2021, 04:55:31 PM »
I've looked at many azimuth charts for various latitudes and the common factor is that the rising/set angle are even all year.
That's an impossibility if the earth has an inclined angle of 23.4° to the ecliptic.

I'm not really sure what you mean by "even". Can you explain?

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2021, 04:08:28 AM »
Even angles, the angle at which the sun rise/sets is always the same as measured from true north, as shown on the azimuth charts.
I have tried to post a couple of pics to explain but I can't seam to get them to load!?

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Offline stack

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2021, 05:42:58 AM »
Even angles, the angle at which the sun rise/sets is always the same as measured from true north, as shown on the azimuth charts.
I have tried to post a couple of pics to explain but I can't seam to get them to load!?

I’m not sure what you mean by “measured from true north.”

To post an image use something like imgur, upload the image, then paste the generated code into your post.

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2021, 01:26:46 PM »
Azimuth angle table.

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2021, 01:31:41 PM »
Using a borrowed globe, this is a view from the sun's point of view. The line across the screen represents the ecliptic. As you can see the angle of the earth affects the rising/setting point of the sun but we don't see this in reality!?

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2021, 01:35:44 PM »
This is a view of the summer solstice for the northern hemisphere, the north pole is pointing towards the sun and is at 90° to the ecliptic. Therefore the rise/set of the sun is equal.


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Offline stack

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2021, 07:20:42 PM »
Using a borrowed globe, this is a view from the sun's point of view. The line across the screen represents the ecliptic. As you can see the angle of the earth affects the rising/setting point of the sun but we don't see this in reality!?


An equinox is when the sun is directly over the equator for basically a day. See that point where the ecliptic meets the equator? 2 days a year the earth rotates through that point where the equator intersects with the ecliptic:


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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2021, 12:10:22 AM »
Azimuth angle table.


Is that what you're trying to interpolate into "only even angles"?  It's a chart ffs.  It would be accurate, to the degree you can try to pinpoint the actual sunrise/sunset, for only one specific point.

Again.  Go to suncalc.org.  It will show you the actual azimuth angles for any location you which.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2021, 05:55:06 AM »
Your missing the Elephant in the room.
You can look at azimuth charts for any point on the earth and you will always find equal angles for sun rise/set, the fact that they are always equal yell out that we are not on a globe tilted at 24.4°.
Look at the little animation that Stack kindly uploaded. It shows as the earth moves in its so called orbit the sun rise is uneven and we don't see that in our Daly lives. The only time it's equal is at the January, by April equinox there's a 48° difference, go look.
The earth is not orbiting the sun and everyone can see this each day but don't realise what's in front of their face.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2021, 06:02:00 AM by Brett500 »

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Offline stack

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2021, 06:51:47 AM »
Your missing the Elephant in the room.
You can look at azimuth charts for any point on the earth and you will always find equal angles for sun rise/set, the fact that they are always equal yell out that we are not on a globe tilted at 24.4°.

I still don't get it. What do you mean by "equal angles"? What's an "equal angle"?
(And just for the record, it's 23.4°, not 24.4°)

Look at the little animation that Stack kindly uploaded. It shows as the earth moves in its so called orbit the sun rise is uneven and we don't see that in our Daly lives. The only time it's equal is at the January, by April equinox there's a 48° difference, go look.
The earth is not orbiting the sun and everyone can see this each day but don't realise what's in front of their face.

So you're simply coming at this as "Earth does not orbit the sun and it does not spin..."? That's your starting point in this? Well that's I guess a starting point. What does the "sunrise is uneven" mean? You're not making any sense with all this "equal", "even", "uneven" stuff. What do you actually mean by all this?

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2021, 12:31:59 PM »
Sorry to confuse anyone.
I thought this would be obvious, but it isn't. 🤔
I believe the earth is flat and stationary.
We observe that the sun rises and sets at the same angle,( as shown in the chart above,) BUT we are told that we sit on a ball tilted at 23.4° ( sorry for being 1° out 🙄).  So azimuth angles charts prove that the globe model is a lie and therefore the whole solar system is a lie as well.
As for what I mean by equal angles can be seen from the chart above, at the equinox (green line) the sun rises 90° from North and sets at 90° before north, that an equal angle, this as I said before is impossible if the earth is a tilted ball, therefore it's not.

Offline scomato

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2021, 05:13:47 PM »
Sorry to confuse anyone.
I thought this would be obvious, but it isn't. 🤔
I believe the earth is flat and stationary.
We observe that the sun rises and sets at the same angle,( as shown in the chart above,) BUT we are told that we sit on a ball tilted at 23.4° ( sorry for being 1° out 🙄).  So azimuth angles charts prove that the globe model is a lie and therefore the whole solar system is a lie as well.
As for what I mean by equal angles can be seen from the chart above, at the equinox (green line) the sun rises 90° from North and sets at 90° before north, that an equal angle, this as I said before is impossible if the earth is a tilted ball, therefore it's not.

Thanks for making it obvious that you don't actually have any idea what the equinox actually is. Which makes the confident tone you write with all the more amusing.

The earth is tilted, and it orbits the Sun. Which means that there will be two moments in each revolution where the tilt is most aligned with the equator (equinoxes) and least aligned with the equator (solstices). Your claim that the 90 degree angles at the equinoxes are impossible makes no sense, when the 90 degree alignment is what defines the equinoxes in the first place - without that alignment there is no equinox.

If there were no tilt, the sun would set and rise in the same place at the same time all the time. There would be no equinox, no solstice, no seasons.



« Last Edit: December 11, 2021, 05:15:18 PM by scomato »

Brett500

Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2021, 07:24:29 PM »
Oh dear, you can't see the wood for the trees.
I thought this was a Flat Earth forum, to discuss ideas and observations. I see it's a place to slag people off, what a pity.
You don't believe in a Flat Earth, so why are you here Scomato?
Time to say goodbye.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2021, 07:57:51 PM by Brett500 »

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2021, 08:09:34 PM »
Sorry to confuse anyone.
I thought this would be obvious, but it isn't. 🤔

What is obvious is that you don't know the difference between 'even' and 'equal'.  Now that we see that you are talking about 'equal' sunrise and sunset angles it is now also obvious that you don't understand geometry either.  Nothing about a tilted rotating sphere prohibits the angle the sun is viewed rising being equal to the angle the sun is viewed setting.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2021, 05:51:08 PM »
@Brett500

Since you seem to think azimuth angles can disprove a theory, let's do a little exercise.

I mentioned suncalc.org.  Go to that site and set your location to 35 deg. south lat.  Long. doesn't matter.  If you get it right, you'll notice that your sunrise/sunset azimuth angles are nearly 120 deg.  What that means is that at 35 deg. S latitude (a little over 10 deg. south of the furthest south the sun travels in the north monopole FE model) you must look 30 degrees south of east to see the sunrise.  Can you explain how that is possible?
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2021, 06:28:11 PM »
@Brett500

Since you seem to think azimuth angles can disprove a theory, let's do a little exercise.
Considering he deleted his account 3 days ago, you might not have much luck.
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we already addressed it.
Follow the Flat Earth Society on Twitter and Facebook!

P.S.  All of us illiterate folks understood this the first time.

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2021, 06:34:08 PM »
@Brett500

Since you seem to think azimuth angles can disprove a theory, let's do a little exercise.
Considering he deleted his account 3 days ago, you might not have much luck.

Suppose not.

Just curious, is there an easy way to see if someone's account is still active?  Like a scarlet D for Douche Deleted or something.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University