*

Offline junker

  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 9595
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #620 on: December 10, 2015, 08:25:36 PM »
Get back on track, please.

*

Offline junker

  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 9595
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #621 on: December 10, 2015, 09:45:06 PM »

Get back on track, please.

What is the track?

Something that resembles actual discussion and not just posting pictures.

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #622 on: December 11, 2015, 08:00:14 PM »


A list of main Shia holy sites in Iraq:

Imam Ali Mosque, Najaf

Imam Husayn Shrine, Karbala

Great Mosque of Kufa


Al-Askari Mosque of Samarra


« Last Edit: December 12, 2015, 07:06:37 AM by sandokhan »

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #623 on: December 13, 2015, 06:32:38 PM »


One of the most remarkable articles ever featured in The Economist was published in 1988, with a prediction:

https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-6359751.html

The cover included the Phoenix symbol:




Again, to understand what is going on in the ME, one has go to back to 1979:

http://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=1805.msg81601#msg81601

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #624 on: December 13, 2015, 10:54:47 PM »
Russian Fellatio: The Thread.

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #625 on: December 14, 2015, 06:49:15 AM »


I thought I'd create a kind of news/discussion thread in regards to this since we have nothing regarding it right now. For a basic idea of who these guys are and what they're doing, there's the Wikipedia page...

With this kind of hapless contribution, you will never understand what is actually going on in the ME.

In fact, you have no idea where to start, or how to anticipate the next moves; that is why you need the information contained in my messages: you should be giving alms and prayers for having the opportunity to read them.

Let me show you just how little you know about the entire situation.

Isis has not allowed foreigners into its senior military positions, with one exception: the Chechens.


Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #626 on: December 14, 2015, 09:15:34 AM »



Even better, from now on, I am going to let vindictus run the show: he is going to tell you, using his high ranking information hotline (wikipedia page), exactly what is going to happen in the next six months in the Middle East, the vital information you all need to really understand and decipher the seemingly random set of events which are unfolding at this present time.

*

Offline Lord Dave

  • *
  • Posts: 6536
  • Grumpy old man.
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #627 on: December 14, 2015, 10:06:43 AM »
Pretty sure your record is non-existent on predictions.
If you are going to DebOOonK an expert then you have to at least provide a source with credentials of equal or greater relevance. Even then, it merely shows that some experts disagree with each other.

*

Offline Rushy

  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7539
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #628 on: December 14, 2015, 01:52:18 PM »
Yaakov leaves, levee returns, levee leaves, yaakov returns

Hmmmmmmmmmmm

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #629 on: January 02, 2016, 09:40:50 AM »


As the wikipedia isis page has not been updated at all (the high-ranking source of information for those who complain about the content of other users' posts), the incursion of Turkey into northern Iraq is certainly an event which will have important consequences in 2016.

With Kemal Ataturk's military victories at the start of the third decade of the 20th century  the treaty of Sevres was never applied.

The 1923 treaty of Lausanne stipulated a provisional boundary in Iraq, with a final agreement to be signed later.

But the League of Nations ended up assigning the Mosul province, with its 600,000 inhabitants, to Iraq, and in 1926 Turkey reluctantly had to sign this agreement.

Turkey's President Suleyman Demirel, in 1995 (during operation steel, when 35,000 Turkish troops entered northern Iraq):

"The border is wrong. The Mosul Province was within the Ottoman Empire's territory. Had that place been a part of Turkey, none of the problems we are confronted with at the present time would have existed."

http://images.mentalfloss.com/sites/default/files/styles/insert_main_wide_image/public/ottoman_empire_territory_lost_copy_copy.jpg (Mosul province within the territory of the Ottoman Empire)

The Turks see the current situation in Iraq as a golden opportunity to regain their real estate.


Iran cannot enter Iraq with its troops, unless there is a clear provocation (some kind of attack on Samarra's Al-Askari mosque, as an example).

The most ominous aspect of the situation in the Middle East is, of course, the bizarre incursion of Saudi Arabia into Yemen (certainly things could have been done differently) which was a sure sign that more was to follow (the 34 nation coalition organized by Riyadh ready to fight isis in iraq).






Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #630 on: January 03, 2016, 01:56:44 PM »


In order to start a world war, one of the following three scenarios are possible.


1. Israel to attack/bomb Iran. Of course, the most unlikely plot, one in which no advantages would be gained by following such a plan.

2. A terrorist attack on the Abraj Al-Bait Towers (Mecca), causing in turn damage to Kaaba; to be blamed on isil.

3. An incursion of the saudi arabian coalition into Iraq, with the aim of creating a Sunni state, carved out of eastern Syria and the western part of Iraq, in conjunction with a terrorist attack on a Shia mosque in Iraq, which would bring Iran right in the middle of the events. This would be followed by large uprisings in Bahrain, Kuwait.

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #631 on: January 05, 2016, 10:59:26 AM »


May 2016

May 9, Mercury solar transit (flight of the Phoenix)

May, very possible Kurdish referendum on independence


The official line is that Turkey can live with a KRG led government in northern Iraq, but not with an independent northern Syrian territory led by the YPG (even though the Turks regard Mosul as their own province).

The official line, also, is that the KRG are Sunni moslems, even though a deeper analysis will reveal very interesting facts.

If Kurdistan becomes independent (notwithstanding Turkey's future plans for Mosul), then the Shia population in Iraq will also demand for a unification of the corresponding territories in southern Iraq and Iran. This will mean that the oil and gas fields of Iraq will belong to the Shia and Kurdish led governments, and not to the Sunnis of Iraq who will be forced to seek any possible alliances, in the short term, to gain access to oil and gas (any discoveries of new oil fields in Sunni led territories will change the equation, but also bring more problems, as Iraq's neighbors to the south might profit from the debacle to grab the Sunni's oil fields).

And the Iranians are fearful of an independent Sunni led region, as they remember too well the eight year long war (1980-1988) which started, some six months earlier, according to some analysts, with the execution of cleric Muhammad Bakir al-Sadr.







« Last Edit: January 05, 2016, 11:05:51 AM by sandokhan »

*

Offline Fat Earl

  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • It will all be fine in the end
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #632 on: January 06, 2016, 10:54:52 AM »
sandokhan, what's your take on this?

Face It, Iraqi Kurds are ISIS http://www.veteranstoday.com/2016/01/03/face-it-iraqi-kurds-are-isis/
The love that we withhold is the pain that we carry, life after life.

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #633 on: January 06, 2016, 01:28:08 PM »


"The Kurdish collaboration [in the KRG] is about to achieve statehood. The statehood of Kurdish nationalism will be used against Turkey and Iran. I tried to stop this."

Abdullah Ocalan (2005)


The leadership of the KRG (Iraqi kurds) and Isil belong to quite different ethnic groups.

Question: why didn't Iran intervene back in 2011 to save their Shia brothers/take over Bahrain, as they could have without endangering the Navy's 5th Fleet stationed in Manama?


There are analysts such as Gordon Duff (veteranstoday) and Thomas Wictor who have some knowledge about the state of affairs in the Middle East; however, it takes much more than that to understand what is going on.



Says T. Wictor: Which leader looks calm and confident, and which looks sheepish and weaselly?

One thing Wictor does not understand is that the person in the photograph is not Putin, but one of his several doubles.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 01:29:50 PM by sandokhan »

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #634 on: January 06, 2016, 11:54:31 PM »


Ah yes, an accurate pic of the T-50's tendency to catch fire.

Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #635 on: January 07, 2016, 08:19:36 AM »


The Soviets have managed to keep the largest weapon development program effectively hidden from western eyes.

They based this program on very advanced mathematics: nonlinear optics, nonlinear scalar wave equations, nonlinear electrogravitation (very little of it was allowed to be transcribed, such as Melnikov's On the Stability of the Center for Time Periodic Perturbations, 1963).

Since computers were not available at that time, the Soviet mathematicians had to develop analytical tools, taking mathematics to a degree undreamed of by their western counterparts.


When applied to conventional weapons, such a high degree of nonlinear mathematics will produce this:



The Shkval Russian Torpedo uses nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics to create supercavitation technology (in 1969 the The Soviet Research Institute of Applied Hydromechanics was created).

The Shkval  is a nuclear-capable underwater anti-ship missile designed for use by nuclear-powered submarines against large surface ships such as aircraft carriers.

The super-cavitating Shkval is considered silent and fast, up to 3-to-4 times over existing torpedoes.

http://cdn3.img.sputniknews.com/images/102908/07/1029080739.jpg

"There are no evident countermeasures to such a weapon, its employment could put adversary naval forces at a considerable disadvantage," FAS Military Analysis Network


*

Offline Rushy

  • Planar Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7539
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #636 on: January 07, 2016, 01:06:13 PM »
I'm wondering where you keep getting all of these amazing Putin memes.

*

Offline Fat Earl

  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • It will all be fine in the end
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #637 on: January 07, 2016, 01:27:57 PM »
Kurd KRG, ISIL and Turkey must have been able to find common grounds since they share the same value stream, the oil. Syrian kurds seem to not do the same.

I belive GD is mixing info, yes he has good intel often but his stance on vaccines and vaccination is ludicrous. Guess he got a lot of shots during his career.

Question: now, what's next?
The love that we withhold is the pain that we carry, life after life.

*

Offline Fat Earl

  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • It will all be fine in the end
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #638 on: January 07, 2016, 02:00:58 PM »
I'm wondering where you keep getting all of these amazing Putin memes.

I think they are really cool.  :)
The love that we withhold is the pain that we carry, life after life.

*

Offline Lord Dave

  • *
  • Posts: 6536
  • Grumpy old man.
    • View Profile
Re: ISIS and the Middle East
« Reply #639 on: January 07, 2016, 02:13:38 PM »
I'm wondering where you keep getting all of these amazing Putin memes.
Maybe he makes them himself?
If you are going to DebOOonK an expert then you have to at least provide a source with credentials of equal or greater relevance. Even then, it merely shows that some experts disagree with each other.