Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« on: August 26, 2014, 07:05:45 PM »
I noticed that this was never properly answered in previous threads so I will revive it anew. Constellation visibility being specific to your latitude alone disproves the flat earth theory. The farther you are from the equator the closer the constellations are to the horizon until they are no longer visible. You can't see the same constellations in the southern hemisphere that you can see in the northern hemisphere. If the world was indeed flat then you would be able to see the same constellations regardless of your location on Earth. Here are two simplified pictures demonstrating my point. Please attempt to provide reasoning as to why I'm wrong.

Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2014, 07:32:37 PM »
The stars are actually much smaller than you think, and are just a few thousand miles above the sea level of the Earth. If you accept this then it's easy to see how one might not see the same stars at different parts of the Earth.

Other phenomenon, like the Polaris appearing to sink as you approach the horizon is merely an optical illusion of perspective. This has been covered many times in many different threads, and we actually have a whole page dedicated to this very subject in our wiki.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2014, 07:35:00 PM by Vauxhall »

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2014, 07:50:42 PM »
I could not open your link but I assume this is the illusion you are talking about.
http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Ships%20appear%20to%20sink%20as%20they%20recede%20past%20the%20horizon

This form of optical illusion does not contend with the fact that we are not dealing with an object going beyond our view but an object that is in view at the same relative size until it dips below the horizon. A ship will appear smaller as it increases it's distance from you. A star dipping below the horizon does not.

Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2014, 08:01:49 PM »
I could not open your link but I assume this is the illusion you are talking about.
http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Ships%20appear%20to%20sink%20as%20they%20recede%20past%20the%20horizon

No. I have updated my post and fixed the hyperlink.

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2014, 08:23:48 PM »
Sorry but even that is incorrect. As demonstrated in the picture of viewing the stars on a flat Earth if I had a powerful enough telescope from lets say your ice wall for example, I would then be able to see Polaris again. Something that is not possible due to the curvature of the Earth.

Offline Gulliver

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2014, 09:18:09 PM »
Sorry but even that is incorrect. As demonstrated in the picture of viewing the stars on a flat Earth if I had a powerful enough telescope from lets say your ice wall for example, I would then be able to see Polaris again. Something that is not possible due to the curvature of the Earth.
Indeed. http://wiki.tfes.org/Sinking_Ship_Effect even claims that telescopes restore the perspective effect. It's wrong of course.
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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2014, 10:24:20 PM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.
Th*rk is the worst person on this website.

Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2014, 10:31:16 PM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2014, 11:36:40 PM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.
Okay... What foreground object appears to move against a background that would cause parallax? Aren't the stars (of the constellations) the farthest away in FET?
Don't rely on FEers for history or physics.
[Hampton] never did [go to prison] and was never found guilty of libel.
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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2014, 12:39:24 AM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

And what of the stars that do not appear to move?
Th*rk is the worst person on this website.

Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2014, 12:44:04 AM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

And what of the stars that do not appear to move?


Most of them appear to move. Have you ever looked closely at a star? It's always blinking.

Offline Gulliver

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2014, 01:26:03 AM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

And what of the stars that do not appear to move?


Most of them appear to move. Have you ever looked closely at a star? It's always blinking.
How does blinking relate to your claim that "most of them appear to move"? Does FET explain the blinking? If so, how?
Don't rely on FEers for history or physics.
[Hampton] never did [go to prison] and was never found guilty of libel.
The ISS doesn't accelerate.

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Offline Rushy

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2014, 01:38:33 AM »
The Earth's atmolayer is quite thick and won't allow you to see every star simultaneously. Even the Sun eventually fades from view. From a geometric standpoint, you could graph a straight line between you and any star in the sky. This doesn't mean you can see them.

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #13 on: August 27, 2014, 03:46:42 AM »
The Earth's atmolayer is quite thick and won't allow you to see every star simultaneously. Even the Sun eventually fades from view. From a geometric standpoint, you could graph a straight line between you and any star in the sky. This doesn't mean you can see them.

Irrelevant. As I stated earlier, with a powerful enough telescope you would be able to see the stars again. Also if the FET was true the the Sun, also a star, would clearly become visible again. Which it does not.

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2014, 03:55:30 AM »
Irrelevant. As I stated earlier, with a powerful enough telescope you would be able to see the stars again. Also if the FET was true the the Sun, also a star, would clearly become visible again. Which it does not.
How, in your opinion, would a telescope alter or counteract the transparency of the atmolayer? Can we extrapolate from that and conclude that a "powerful enough" telescope could see through any substance? I'd really like to lay my hands on that x-ray vision technology.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 03:58:16 AM by pizaaplanet »
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Offline Gulliver

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #15 on: August 27, 2014, 04:38:52 AM »
Irrelevant. As I stated earlier, with a powerful enough telescope you would be able to see the stars again. Also if the FET was true the the Sun, also a star, would clearly become visible again. Which it does not.
How, in your opinion, would a telescope alter or counteract the transparency of the atmolayer? Can we extrapolate from that and conclude that a "powerful enough" telescope could see through any substance? I'd really like to lay my hands on that x-ray vision technology.
Would you believe your own Wiki?
Quote from: http://wiki.tfes.org/Experimental_Evidence
There have been experiments where half-sunken ships have been restored by simply looking at them through telescopes, showing that they are not actually hiding behind "hills of water".
Don't rely on FEers for history or physics.
[Hampton] never did [go to prison] and was never found guilty of libel.
The ISS doesn't accelerate.

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #16 on: August 27, 2014, 04:43:59 AM »
No, I do not subscribe to Tom's model. You know this. I'm also surprised that you think perspective and the atmoplane are the same thing. I learn new things about dishonesty every day!

Besides, I'm interested in MD's claims, so please do allow him to explain himself, unless you have a claim to some greater knowledge on his own thoughts.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 04:46:50 AM by pizaaplanet »
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we already addressed it.
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Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #17 on: August 27, 2014, 04:56:29 AM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

And what of the stars that do not appear to move?


Most of them appear to move. Have you ever looked closely at a star? It's always blinking.
How does blinking relate to your claim that "most of them appear to move"? Does FET explain the blinking? If so, how?

The blinking that you experience is actually an optic illusion caused by the extreme  light stream (condensed by aetheric pressures) moving ever so slightly. Your eye has trouble processing this and converts it to blinking.

When you get down to it, the eye is a very tricky thing. We don't always see what is really there. Basic optical illusions tell us this. We can't even see in every color of the spectrum. Zetetic thinking may seem like the polar opposite of this viewpoint, but I assure you it's not.

Offline Gulliver

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Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #18 on: August 27, 2014, 07:30:03 AM »
Also if stars were only 3000 miles distant we should see much more severe parallax than is observed.

The parallax is there. It's the illusion of constellations changing as you move across the Earth disc.

And what of the stars that do not appear to move?


Most of them appear to move. Have you ever looked closely at a star? It's always blinking.
How does blinking relate to your claim that "most of them appear to move"? Does FET explain the blinking? If so, how?

The blinking that you experience is actually an optic illusion caused by the extreme  light stream (condensed by aetheric pressures) moving ever so slightly. Your eye has trouble processing this and converts it to blinking.

When you get down to it, the eye is a very tricky thing. We don't always see what is really there. Basic optical illusions tell us this. We can't even see in every color of the spectrum. Zetetic thinking may seem like the polar opposite of this viewpoint, but I assure you it's not.
So blinking has nothing to do with the apparent movement. Got it.
Don't rely on FEers for history or physics.
[Hampton] never did [go to prison] and was never found guilty of libel.
The ISS doesn't accelerate.

Ghost of V

Re: Constellations and their respective hemispheres
« Reply #19 on: August 27, 2014, 07:45:00 AM »
I don't see how you came to that conclusion, but OK.