The Sun
« on: October 31, 2020, 05:57:22 PM »
I live around 31 latitude in the northern hemisphere.  It’s hot most of the year and this week average Highs will be around 80f and lows 60f. Close to the same temp are the same all alone the East coast of USA from latitudes of 30-34. 
If you would go same latitude on the Atlantic Ocean coast in the Southern Hemisphere, say Rio Grande do Sul.  The average highs this week will be 55f and 40f for lows.  It should be the same temperatures in Rio Grande today as it would be where I live at in April/May.   Our average highs in May are 85f and 65f for lows. The temperatures are no where close to one another.
Does the Sun increase in elevation as it gets closer to January?

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Offline RhesusVX

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Re: The Sun
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2020, 07:48:27 PM »
I live around 31 latitude in the northern hemisphere.  It’s hot most of the year and this week average Highs will be around 80f and lows 60f. Close to the same temp are the same all alone the East coast of USA from latitudes of 30-34. 
If you would go same latitude on the Atlantic Ocean coast in the Southern Hemisphere, say Rio Grande do Sul.  The average highs this week will be 55f and 40f for lows.  It should be the same temperatures in Rio Grande today as it would be where I live at in April/May.   Our average highs in May are 85f and 65f for lows. The temperatures are no where close to one another.
Does the Sun increase in elevation as it gets closer to January?

Hi, in flat Earth theory (FET), the Sun moves about about in the sky above the Earth according to the following:

https://wiki.tfes.org/Flat_Earth_-_Frequently_Asked_Questions#How_do_you_explain_day.2Fnight_cycles_and_seasons.3F

In round Earth theory (RET), the Earth rotates around a tilted axis, and the part of the Earth tilted towards the Sun receives more light directly compared to the part that is tilted away.  Think of it like shining a torch at a piece of paper.  Do it straight on and you see a bright circle.  That's summer.  Tilt the paper, and that the same amount of light turns into an oval and is spread over a larger area.  That's winter.  As the Earth orbits the Sun, over the course of a year it's always summer for some locations and winter for other locations at the same time (i.e. 31 north can be hotter than 31 south):

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/seasons/en/

Which model you choose to believe is really the crux of the question, not really what causes the difference in temperatures because both account for it.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2020, 07:52:40 PM by RhesusVX »
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Re: The Sun
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2020, 08:07:10 PM »
I live around 31 latitude in the northern hemisphere.  It’s hot most of the year and this week average Highs will be around 80f and lows 60f. Close to the same temp are the same all alone the East coast of USA from latitudes of 30-34. 
If you would go same latitude on the Atlantic Ocean coast in the Southern Hemisphere, say Rio Grande do Sul.  The average highs this week will be 55f and 40f for lows.  It should be the same temperatures in Rio Grande today as it would be where I live at in April/May.   Our average highs in May are 85f and 65f for lows. The temperatures are no where close to one another.
Does the Sun increase in elevation as it gets closer to January?

Hi, in flat Earth theory (FET), the Sun moves about about in the sky above the Earth according to the following:

https://wiki.tfes.org/Flat_Earth_-_Frequently_Asked_Questions#How_do_you_explain_day.2Fnight_cycles_and_seasons.3F

In round Earth theory (RET), the Earth rotates around a tilted axis, and the part of the Earth tilted towards the Sun receives more light directly compared to the part that is tilted away.  Think of it like shining a torch at a piece of paper.  Do it straight on and you see a bright circle.  That's summer.  Tilt the paper, and that the same amount of light turns into an oval and is spread over a larger area.  That's winter.  As the Earth orbits the Sun, over the course of a year it's always summer for some locations and winter for other locations at the same time (i.e. 31 north can be hotter than 31 south):

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/seasons/en/

Which model you choose to believe is really the crux of the question, not really what causes the difference in temperatures because both account for it.

Yes I’m aware of that, but the temps of some of the locations in the southern hemisphere do not look that way.  So I’m asking does the Sun also increase elevation and gets further from the Earths surface as January approaches. And from January to June the Sun decreases it’s elevation and gets closer to the Earths surface?

Re: The Sun
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2020, 08:26:19 PM »
The weather on the Atlantic coast at latitude 31 North does not replicate the weather at latitude 31 South because there's a lot more governing the weather than just latitude. Nearby ocean currents, presence or absence of high mountains near each coast, local wind patterns, high or low local humidity due to rainforests or desert are just a few of the factors.
Once again - you assume that the centre of the video is the centre of the camera's frame. We know that this isn't the case.

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Offline RhesusVX

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Re: The Sun
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2020, 09:00:21 PM »
The weather on the Atlantic coast at latitude 31 North does not replicate the weather at latitude 31 South because there's a lot more governing the weather than just latitude. Nearby ocean currents, presence or absence of high mountains near each coast, local wind patterns, high or low local humidity due to rainforests or desert are just a few of the factors.

Yep exactly, well added.

@Jay Seneca, to answer your question, no, the Sun does not increase or decrease in elevation relative to the Earth in either model.  While the Earth's orbit is not perfectly circular, seasons are caused by axial tilt, and variation beyond that is caused by the other effects Longtitube highlights.
Quote from:  Earth, Solar System, Oort Cloud, LIC, Local Bubble, Orion Arm, Milky Way, Local Group, Virgo Supercluster, Laniakea Supercluster, Universe
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