The night sky seen from the northern and southern hemispheres is radially different.  No matter how powerful your telescope you can not see stars that are on the other side of the planet from your position.  That is what we observe and it makes perfect sense for a ball earth.  But why would it be true for a flat earth?
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.

Offline Cypher9

  • *
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
The following comment I found online a while back might be helpful to you in explaining the stars question:

'2 people are standing on the opposite walls of a room, one wall is north, the other is south, and the moon is a picture on the ceiling. The top of the picture will be top for the one observer and the bottom of the picture will be top for the other observer...'

*

Offline Tumeni

  • *
  • Posts: 2975
    • View Profile
The following comment I found online a while back might be helpful to you in explaining the stars question:

'2 people are standing on the opposite walls of a room, one wall is north, the other is south, and the moon is a picture on the ceiling. The top of the picture will be top for the one observer and the bottom of the picture will be top for the other observer...'

If the picture on the ceiling is a circle, both observers will see an ellipse. If it is drawn to appear to one as a circle, the other will not see it as such.
=============================
Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
=============================

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

The following comment I found online a while back might be helpful to you in explaining the stars question:

'2 people are standing on the opposite walls of a room, one wall is north, the other is south, and the moon is a picture on the ceiling. The top of the picture will be top for the one observer and the bottom of the picture will be top for the other observer...'

It is not a question of orientation, which should remain the same anyway (e.g. the FE model claims north points to the center of the flat earth and the entire universe rotates around that axis).  But even forgetting orientation, as you move from north to south (or south to north) previously unseen stars/constellations become visible and others are no longer visible.  The night sky in the northern regions is radically different from the night sky in the southern regions.   It's clearly due to the earth being in the way which can not happen on a flat earth.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 08:07:27 AM by ichoosereality »
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.

*

Offline stack

  • *
  • Posts: 3016
    • View Profile
The following comment I found online a while back might be helpful to you in explaining the stars question:

'2 people are standing on the opposite walls of a room, one wall is north, the other is south, and the moon is a picture on the ceiling. The top of the picture will be top for the one observer and the bottom of the picture will be top for the other observer...'

I don't believe that is relevant to what the OP is asking. S/He is referring to stars, not the moon. In short, perhaps, why can't you see Polaris from a ways south of the equator and conversely, why can't you see the Crux from a ways north of the equator?

*

Offline WTF_Seriously

  • *
  • Posts: 1066
  • When I grow up I wanna be like Markjo
    • View Profile
You folks seem to be forgetting bendy light.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

Offline Action80

  • *
  • Posts: 1734
    • View Profile
The night sky seen from the northern and southern hemispheres is radially different.  No matter how powerful your telescope you can not see stars that are on the other side of the planet from your position.  That is what we observe and it makes perfect sense for a ball earth.  But why would it be true for a flat earth?
Despite the height of an object above our heads, it will eventually be obscured by objects arising from the flat earth plane.
It's so hard to have faith in humanity when they do shit like this.

"I hate the police so I'm gonna burn a Walgreen's!"

Offline Cypher9

  • *
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
I want to know why it doesn't look completely different every night if we're spinning around through space like they say we are. All that supposed movement still the position of the stars remains pretty much the same each night. Something about that seems off if you ask me.

*

Offline Tumeni

  • *
  • Posts: 2975
    • View Profile
... will eventually be obscured by objects arising from the flat earth plane.

... and these objects are .... what?
=============================
Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
=============================

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

*

Offline Tumeni

  • *
  • Posts: 2975
    • View Profile
I want to know why it doesn't look completely different every night if we're spinning around through space like they say we are. All that supposed movement still the position of the stars remains pretty much the same each night. Something about that seems off if you ask me.

Don't know about you, but the most recognisable constellation in my sky, at least over winter, is Orion. It doesn't stay still in my sky, in general terms I clearly see it at first to my South East, and it doesn't take long for it to have moved to South West and beyond over the course of a night.

Certainly doesn't stay still. Neither does the Moon, which shows the same sort of behaviour, crossing my sky exactly as would be expected with us rotating around, bringing it into view and taking it out of view, appearing in broadly the same spot once every 24 hours. The spot varies long-term, according to the seasons. 

The stars don't look COMPLETELY different because, in the big scheme of things, we're hardly moving at all. We spin around once every 24 hours or so, cycle around the Sun once every 365 days, but in galactic terms, we're a drop in the ocean. A grain of sand on a big beach.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 05:41:22 PM by Tumeni »
=============================
Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
=============================

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

Offline Action80

  • *
  • Posts: 1734
    • View Profile
... will eventually be obscured by objects arising from the flat earth plane.

... and these objects are .... what?
Bushes, trees, buildings, mountains, clouds, etc.
It's so hard to have faith in humanity when they do shit like this.

"I hate the police so I'm gonna burn a Walgreen's!"

You folks seem to be forgetting bendy light.

So why do you enlighten us then?
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.

The night sky seen from the northern and southern hemispheres is radially different.  No matter how powerful your telescope you can not see stars that are on the other side of the planet from your position.  That is what we observe and it makes perfect sense for a ball earth.  But why would it be true for a flat earth?
Despite the height of an object above our heads, it will eventually be obscured by objects arising from the flat earth plane.

I have no idea what you are trying to say.    The objects in the night sky appear to rotate nighty around the axis of the earth (due to the earth spinning, not the universe spinning).
As you move north or south the sky also appears to rotate in the opposite direction, but that is due to your position on a globe changing and the globe obstructing or revealing a different segment of sky.
In the far north or far south the stars are completely different. How can you explain that for a flat earth?   
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.

*

Offline WTF_Seriously

  • *
  • Posts: 1066
  • When I grow up I wanna be like Markjo
    • View Profile
You folks seem to be forgetting bendy light.

So why do you enlighten us then?

Bendy light affects all light.  Get far enough away from it and it bends up over your head.  Just like sunset.  Something like that.  It's bendy light.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University


Bendy light affects all light.  Get far enough away from it and it bends up over your head.  Just like sunset.  Something like that.  It's bendy light.

"bendy light" is nonsense.  If light coming from an object curved away from the observe you would not see the object, it would not appear to make the object decent or ascend.
Those pushing "bendy light" are just throwing words around that have no meaning.
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.

*

Offline WTF_Seriously

  • *
  • Posts: 1066
  • When I grow up I wanna be like Markjo
    • View Profile

Bendy light affects all light.  Get far enough away from it and it bends up over your head.  Just like sunset.  Something like that.  It's bendy light.

"bendy light" is nonsense.  If light coming from an object curved away from the observe you would not see the object, it would not appear to make the object decent or ascend.
Those pushing "bendy light" are just throwing words around that have no meaning.

Now is where you get directed to the WIKI

https://wiki.tfes.org/Electromagnetic_Acceleration
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

Offline Cypher9

  • *
  • Posts: 109
    • View Profile
I want to know why it doesn't look completely different every night if we're spinning around through space like they say we are. All that supposed movement still the position of the stars remains pretty much the same each night. Something about that seems off if you ask me.

Don't know about you, but the most recognisable constellation in my sky, at least over winter, is Orion. It doesn't stay still in my sky, in general terms I clearly see it at first to my South East, and it doesn't take long for it to have moved to South West and beyond over the course of a night.

Certainly doesn't stay still. Neither does the Moon, which shows the same sort of behaviour, crossing my sky exactly as would be expected with us rotating around, bringing it into view and taking it out of view, appearing in broadly the same spot once every 24 hours. The spot varies long-term, according to the seasons. 

The stars don't look COMPLETELY different because, in the big scheme of things, we're hardly moving at all. We spin around once every 24 hours or so, cycle around the Sun once every 365 days, but in galactic terms, we're a drop in the ocean. A grain of sand on a big beach.

But Orion is still there isn't it? Just strikes me as odd that we're supposedly going in circles around the sun which in turn is spinning around the galaxy which also is likely doing something similar and all the time our night sky never seems to change that much.

Offline Action80

  • *
  • Posts: 1734
    • View Profile
The night sky seen from the northern and southern hemispheres is radially different.  No matter how powerful your telescope you can not see stars that are on the other side of the planet from your position.  That is what we observe and it makes perfect sense for a ball earth.  But why would it be true for a flat earth?
Despite the height of an object above our heads, it will eventually be obscured by objects arising from the flat earth plane.

I have no idea what you are trying to say.
Okay, let me elucidate.

A plane is flying from N to S.

You do not see it immediately due to clouds between you and the plane, but can hear it.

Then, it appears to you from between the clouds, then disappears again briefly, but reappears.

As it makes its way further S, it disappears behind a ten foot tall tree immediately behind you, then reappears briefly, only to disappear behind a water tower 1/2 mile away from you.
Then it finally disappears from your sight behind a distant line of low level clouds 10 miles down range of your position.
In the far north or far south the stars are completely different. How can you explain that for a flat earth?
That has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

I would expect to see different things over my head as I move about, even in a 10x12 room.
It's so hard to have faith in humanity when they do shit like this.

"I hate the police so I'm gonna burn a Walgreen's!"

*

Offline Tumeni

  • *
  • Posts: 2975
    • View Profile
I want to know why it doesn't look completely different every night if we're spinning around through space like they say we are. All that supposed movement still the position of the stars remains pretty much the same each night. Something about that seems off if you ask me.

The stars don't look COMPLETELY different because, in the big scheme of things, we're hardly moving at all. We spin around once every 24 hours or so, cycle around the Sun once every 365 days, but in galactic terms, we're a drop in the ocean. A grain of sand on a big beach.

But Orion is still there isn't it? Just strikes me as odd that we're supposedly going in circles around the sun which in turn is spinning around the galaxy which also is likely doing something similar and all the time our night sky never seems to change that much.

I refer again to my last statement, now bolded.

I can only suggest you think bigger. Our little circuit around the Sun is a minor blip, a nothingness in galactic terms.
=============================
Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
=============================

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

I want to know why it doesn't look completely different every night if we're spinning around through space like they say we are. All that supposed movement still the position of the stars remains pretty much the same each night. Something about that seems off if you ask me.

The stars don't look COMPLETELY different because, in the big scheme of things, we're hardly moving at all. We spin around once every 24 hours or so, cycle around the Sun once every 365 days, but in galactic terms, we're a drop in the ocean. A grain of sand on a big beach.

But Orion is still there isn't it? Just strikes me as odd that we're supposedly going in circles around the sun which in turn is spinning around the galaxy which also is likely doing something similar and all the time our night sky never seems to change that much.

I refer again to my last statement, now bolded.

I can only suggest you think bigger. Our little circuit around the Sun is a minor blip, a nothingness in galactic terms.

The closest stars are about 10 light years away, most of the stars in the night sky are between 10 and 100 light years away, but lets use 10.  The distance from on end of earths orbit to the other is 600 milling miles.  So if you do the math, I think that comes out to the closest stars being about 100,000 times further away then the maxim different view positions of the earth.  So if you have an unobstructed view of an object 1 mile away and move about 1/2 an inch (about 1/100,000th of a mile) left or right, would you expect your view of that object to change?  And the is using the maximum difference at the extreme ends of an orbit for the analogy..  Day to day the difference for viewing an object 1 mile away would be very roughly 185 times less or around 7/100ths of an inch.

By using precise instrumentation differences CAN be seen and plotting the orbits of galaxies (which you can't see with the naked eye) around each other is part of the evidence for dark matter.

10 LY = 5.8E13 miles, call it 60 trillion
earth orbit diameter 600 million 6E8 miles
If "bendy light" were true large solid state lasers would function very differently depending on their orientation relative to the surface of the earth and likely not operate at all when parallel to the surface, but this is not observed thus bendy light is false.