Re: How do FE proponents explain flying over the south pole?
« Reply #100 on: January 01, 2022, 02:52:33 PM »
What you are talking about is the difference between True Airspeed (TAS) and Indicated Airspeed (IAS).  IAS is what is shown on the pilot's Airspeed Indicator, and is important for the aerodynamic handling of the aircraft, but at high altitude it is significantly lower than the TAS.  If you like, IAS is the number of cookies per second, but is less than the actual speed.  TAS is used for navigation, and is the maximum speed quoted by the manufacturer. 

What this means in practice is that the aircraft is faster at altitude, as you suggest, but this is already the limiting speed quoted by the manufacturer.  If the limiting TAS is, say 500 knots, the pilot might reach this speed when he sees only around 300 kts on the Airspeed Indicator. 

Its not that the aircraft is exceeding this limiting speed at high altitude (low air density), its just that the pilot is actually seeing a lower figure for IAS.  The minimum air density (in other words is maximum altitude) is specified, again, by the manufacturer. 

It is quite categorical.  The aircraft will not travel through the air, at any density which it is certified, faster than the manufacturer says. 




Re: How do FE proponents explain flying over the south pole?
« Reply #101 on: January 01, 2022, 03:07:04 PM »
This is a great response...  I don't have an answer.    ::) :o ;D
DISCLAIMER:. I advocate a South Pole centered Flat Earth that spins once a day, wobbles once a year, is covered by a dome shaped atmosphere that tilts towards a small solar system at about 30deg, and magnets are what holds everything together.

Re: How do FE proponents explain flying over the south pole?
« Reply #102 on: January 11, 2022, 10:33:56 AM »
...Generally winds play a bigger factor as you head south into thicker atmospheres.

The atmosphere is not particularly "thicker" in the southern hemisphere.  The density of the
atmosphere changes with altitude, not location.