FEers and REers agree on just about nothing. However, I don't see how "sunrise" and "sunset" times can be disputed. They are documented and easily verifiable. For example, I randomly googled sunrise times for Sunday, June 27, 2021 for Helsinki and got 3:57 a.m. (GMT+3), and Cape Town and got 7:52 a.m. (GMT+2). World-wide times for both "sunrise" and "sunset" could be gathered and input to a spatial interpolation algorithm to create a light/dark demarcation line for the entire world at any given time.

Another point of agreement is probably that the dark/light demarcation line is smooth as opposed to a zig-zag. The RE model is pretty clear on that. For FE, the spotlight effect is also shown to have a smooth radius creating a circular demarcation line.

Given those two points of agreement, the locations associated with each time could then be plotted on a map with various spotlight radii to create test FE maps. This process could be repeated as many times as necessary, and at all times of the year, and tested with digital cross-correlation until only one scenario fits all locations at all times, thus creating an accurate FE map.

Comments? 
« Last Edit: June 26, 2021, 03:59:46 PM by stevecanuck »

SteveRossi1216

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2021, 01:40:11 PM »
Sounds great, another nail in the coffin. For me, I just try to book a flight from Sydney to Buenos Aries and feel red pilled.

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2021, 02:32:27 AM »
this sounds good.   i also hear that you can judge the suns latitude in relation to the earth by measuring how quickley the suns light travels accross known distances and how much daylight an area exoeriences.  it should travel quicker up north and more slowly down south right?
Truth doesn't pick sides.

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2021, 07:02:11 AM »
FEers and REers agree on just about nothing. However, I don't see how "sunrise" and "sunset" times can be disputed. They are documented and easily verifiable. For example, I randomly googled sunrise times for Sunday, June 27, 2021 for Helsinki and got 3:57 a.m. (GMT+3), and Cape Town and got 7:52 a.m. (GMT+2). World-wide times for both "sunrise" and "sunset" could be gathered and input to a spatial interpolation algorithm to create a light/dark demarcation line for the entire world at any given time.

Another point of agreement is probably that the dark/light demarcation line is smooth as opposed to a zig-zag. The RE model is pretty clear on that. For FE, the spotlight effect is also shown to have a smooth radius creating a circular demarcation line.

Given those two points of agreement, the locations associated with each time could then be plotted on a map with various spotlight radii to create test FE maps. This process could be repeated as many times as necessary, and at all times of the year, and tested with digital cross-correlation until only one scenario fits all locations at all times, thus creating an accurate FE map.

Comments?

Stevecanuck, I like your idea and it should work.  If you refer to my post of July 4th, I found extra information which includes Sun azimuth (angle) at dawn and dusk which will improve the accuracy of your Sun positions. 
I'm waiting (for nearly a month) for some FE wise person to explain how, in the Southern Hemisphere, at the Southern Solstice, the Sun rises SOUTH of my position (37o S) and sets to the South.  Because it suggests all Flat Earth maps fail to explain this well observed occurrence.  Hendro

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2021, 06:30:11 PM »
Just the sunrise/sunset times clearly show that they move around the earth, not across some layout of continents on a flat earth.

Further making a little use of modern technology, find a buddy on the other side of the planet.  Call them up when the sun is rising or setting for you and it will be doing the opposite for them.
How can a FE explain one observe seeing the sun rising in the east while another somewhere else on the planet sees it setting in the west at the same time?  There is only one sun, it can be doing both.

I find the entire FE proposition nonsensical to be honest.   Science is a methodology not an ideology.  It is nonsensical to accept the results of that methodology in some domains but not others.  Doing so, like FE belief is an instance of ideology over facts (albeit an extreme one) and folks that have adopted that philosophy seem very unlikely to be swayed by pointing out facts.  Sadly this is a very bad thing for our civilization.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 06:32:38 PM by ichoosereality »

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2021, 08:20:48 PM »
How can a FE explain one observe seeing the sun rising in the east while another somewhere else on the planet sees it setting in the west at the same time?  There is only one sun, it can be doing both.

The leading edge of the spotlight sun looks like the rising sun and the trailing edge of the spotlight sun looks like the setting sun. There is only one sun but there is a leading and trailing edge in two distant locations.  Honestly, this concept of one sun seen differently in different locations is the same in both round and flat earth theory.  Shouldn't be hard to understand.

https://wiki.tfes.org/Sun
The hallmark of true science is repeatability to the point of accurate prediction.

Re: Building a map of the flat earth using "sunrise" and "sunset".
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2021, 12:53:00 AM »
How can a FE explain one observe seeing the sun rising in the east while another somewhere else on the planet sees it setting in the west at the same time?  There is only one sun, it can be doing both.

The leading edge of the spotlight sun looks like the rising sun and the trailing edge of the spotlight sun looks like the setting sun. There is only one sun but there is a leading and trailing edge in two distant locations.  Honestly, this concept of one sun seen differently in different locations is the same in both round and flat earth theory.  Shouldn't be hard to understand.

https://wiki.tfes.org/Sun
Except the the sunrise or sunset line is not a circle but a north south line (ignore the slight tip due to tipped axis for simplicity)..  A straight line of dark to light or light to dark is what you get with a (comparatively tiny) rotating ball earth and a huge bright sun illuminating half the planet and that is what we observe.  A "spotlight" sun would cast a round illumination spot and thus a curved sunrise/sunet line, which we do not observe.

The claim of the sunrise and sunset being an illusion of perspective of distant objects appearing lower also does not work as that does not cause objects to appear to change shape.  But we clearly see the round sun being obscured behind the western horizon not just getting smaller or dimmer.  Likewise for sunset, we see the disk of the sun appearing, not an already round object getting larger.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2021, 01:13:17 AM by ichoosereality »