Visibility of the ISS
« on: April 03, 2023, 05:02:05 AM »
Hello. Recently I was able to observe the ISS and after spending a couple minutes moving through the night sky, it disappeared very suddenly while it was still very high above the horizon. In a RE, this can be explained by the station moving into the shadow of the earth. Since it is under my understanding that in FE, the sun just moves around in circles over the surface of the earth and therefore, any satellites including the ISS would constantly be in full view of the sun. If I am correct, then the ISS would be constantly illuminated by the sun. This however is not the case and my question is how does FE explain satellites suddenly disappearing as they move through the night sky. Thank you.

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2023, 02:57:18 AM »
Here's an image I took of the ISS a while back with just an Orion XT8 and 2x Barlow. I even used a horrible camera, the ZWO ASI224MC, too. I wish you the best of luck getting an answer.

"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens

Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2023, 03:00:36 AM »
In Flat Earth (FE) theory, the Sun is not moving in a circle around the surface of the Earth. Instead, the Sun is thought to be a celestial body that is fixed in one stationary position near the North Pole. This means that when satellites or other objects move into the shadow of the Earth, they are blocked from direct sunlight and can suddenly disappear from view, as you experienced. This phenomenon is known as an eclipse, and it occurs due to the way the Sun's light interacts with the Earth's atmosphere, which is why the ISS will eventually reappear after a few minutes when it moves back into direct sunlight.
I am a beginner in the horizon world, I believe in horizon saying, and I hope to communicate with you.

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2023, 03:28:01 AM »
In Flat Earth (FE) theory, the Sun is not moving in a circle around the surface of the Earth. Instead, the Sun is thought to be a celestial body that is fixed in one stationary position near the North Pole. This means that when satellites or other objects move into the shadow of the Earth, they are blocked from direct sunlight and can suddenly disappear from view, as you experienced. This phenomenon is known as an eclipse, and it occurs due to the way the Sun's light interacts with the Earth's atmosphere, which is why the ISS will eventually reappear after a few minutes when it moves back into direct sunlight.

Is this some AI-generated answer? If you're trying to talk about TFES' theory of the Sun, then you're lying. See https://wiki.tfes.org/Sun. I've never heard of any flat Earther that claims the Sun is stationary over the North Pole, better yet, if anyone did, they would have an immensely difficult time providing evidence for such a claim. After you talk about the "FE" theory of the Sun, you literally just explain how the ISS works in the heliocentric model, and incorrectly at that. You claim that an eclipse is an atmospheric phenomenon, which it is not.
"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2023, 05:37:48 PM »
The object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2023, 09:52:11 AM by Action80 »
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2023, 07:53:11 AM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2023, 09:53:58 AM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2023, 11:37:06 AM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

A cloud predicted by NASA? 

https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/home.cfm 

Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2023, 06:10:38 PM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

Even if the ISS was obstructed by a cloud, how does it happen so consistently every night the ISS can be observed and why has it never been observed to leave the shadow of the cloud and reappear in the night sky again. Every time I see it disappear, it never reappears unless it has circled the earth and reappeared back on the horizon again. On top of all of this, if the ISS is commonly obstructed from the sun by clouds, then there would certainly be many instances where the ISS would appear high in the sky and not at the horizon because it would be obstructed.

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2023, 06:17:23 PM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

A cloud predicted by NASA? 

https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/home.cfm
The question was " how does FE explain satellites suddenly disappearing as they move through the night sky."

You may not like my answer.

Regardless, the Sun does not constantly illuminate the entirety of the flat earth plane.

NASA would hopefully know when their materials would disappear from the view of persons in select regions.
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2023, 06:18:41 PM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

Even if the ISS was obstructed by a cloud, how does it happen so consistently every night the ISS can be observed and why has it never been observed to leave the shadow of the cloud and reappear in the night sky again. Every time I see it disappear, it never reappears unless it has circled the earth and reappeared back on the horizon again. On top of all of this, if the ISS is commonly obstructed from the sun by clouds, then there would certainly be many instances where the ISS would appear high in the sky and not at the horizon because it would be obstructed.
You are asking me to account for your experiences.

How or why could I even do that?
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2023, 08:28:49 PM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

A cloud predicted by NASA? 

https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/home.cfm
The question was " how does FE explain satellites suddenly disappearing as they move through the night sky."

You may not like my answer.

Regardless, the Sun does not constantly illuminate the entirety of the flat earth plane.

NASA would hopefully know when their materials would disappear from the view of persons in select regions.

Except it doesn't disappear from view in only a select few regions, the ISS disappears from view while above the horizon (when obstructed) everywhere that it appears above the horizon.
"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens

Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2023, 08:45:19 PM »
THe object could have passed through a section of the sky at an angle causing it to be occulted by another object in the sky.

That's quite literally what we observe. The Earth's shadow is cast onto the ISS, and that is why it disappears while above the horizon. As far as it being occulted by ANOTHER object, I'd like to know what object you're referring to. Remember that it needs to be big enough to make the ISS completely disappear while above the horizon.
It could have been occulted by a cloud lying between its location and the sun.

I see shiny airplanes flying overhead all the time, then they are no longer shiny.

Even if the ISS was obstructed by a cloud, how does it happen so consistently every night the ISS can be observed and why has it never been observed to leave the shadow of the cloud and reappear in the night sky again. Every time I see it disappear, it never reappears unless it has circled the earth and reappeared back on the horizon again. On top of all of this, if the ISS is commonly obstructed from the sun by clouds, then there would certainly be many instances where the ISS would appear high in the sky and not at the horizon because it would be obstructed.
You are asking me to account for your experiences.

How or why could I even do that?

Observing the ISS is very easy as long as you are in the right place. There are numerous websites that will tell you when and where exactly to look for the ISS. If you are in a location on earth where observing the ISS is impossible, you can simply look for smaller satellites. Though this is harder to do, it is still very possible.

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2023, 09:54:12 PM »
Except it doesn't disappear from view in only a select few regions, the ISS disappears from view while above the horizon (when obstructed) everywhere that it appears above the horizon.
You are saying once it disappears from your view, it is also invisible to everyone else?

Come now...

Your horizon isn't everyones' horizon.
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2023, 09:55:51 PM »
Observing the ISS is very easy as long as you are in the right place. There are numerous websites that will tell you when and where exactly to look for the ISS. If you are in a location on earth where observing the ISS is impossible, you can simply look for smaller satellites. Though this is harder to do, it is still very possible.
I still have no idea why this is so difficult.

Things in the sky come and go from view.

It has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

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Offline stack

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2023, 11:56:36 PM »
Observing the ISS is very easy as long as you are in the right place. There are numerous websites that will tell you when and where exactly to look for the ISS. If you are in a location on earth where observing the ISS is impossible, you can simply look for smaller satellites. Though this is harder to do, it is still very possible.
I still have no idea why this is so difficult.

Things in the sky come and go from view.

It has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

I think the question is how do these ISS trackers know exactly when it will be viewable by you in your location, when it will come into view and when it will leave your view? And you're saying that it's clouds that determine this. So how do these trackers know when there will be clouds obscuring your view?

And just as a side note, the trackers are predicated on the ISS' 90 minute orbit around a globe earth, so it is somewhat relevant to the shape of the world.

Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2023, 01:05:53 AM »
Except it doesn't disappear from view in only a select few regions, the ISS disappears from view while above the horizon (when obstructed) everywhere that it appears above the horizon.
You are saying once it disappears from your view, it is also invisible to everyone else?

Come now...

Your horizon isn't everyones' horizon.

You’re so close to getting it.

Offline Action80

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2023, 02:37:07 AM »
Observing the ISS is very easy as long as you are in the right place. There are numerous websites that will tell you when and where exactly to look for the ISS. If you are in a location on earth where observing the ISS is impossible, you can simply look for smaller satellites. Though this is harder to do, it is still very possible.
I still have no idea why this is so difficult.

Things in the sky come and go from view.

It has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

I think the question is how do these ISS trackers know exactly when it will be viewable by you in your location, when it will come into view and when it will leave your view? And you're saying that it's clouds that determine this. So how do these trackers know when there will be clouds obscuring your view?

And just as a side note, the trackers are predicated on the ISS' 90 minute orbit around a globe earth, so it is somewhat relevant to the shape of the world.
I wrote it could have been occulted by clouds due to an initial misunderstanding of what the OP was stating.

Regardless, the comings and goings of overhead objects circling over our heads isn't based on the shape of the earth. The trackers can predict this just like someone can say what time the sun will appear.
To be honest I am getting pretty bored of this place.

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2023, 06:27:06 AM »
Observing the ISS is very easy as long as you are in the right place. There are numerous websites that will tell you when and where exactly to look for the ISS. If you are in a location on earth where observing the ISS is impossible, you can simply look for smaller satellites. Though this is harder to do, it is still very possible.
I still have no idea why this is so difficult.

Things in the sky come and go from view.

It has nothing to do with the shape of the earth.

I think the question is how do these ISS trackers know exactly when it will be viewable by you in your location, when it will come into view and when it will leave your view? And you're saying that it's clouds that determine this. So how do these trackers know when there will be clouds obscuring your view?

And just as a side note, the trackers are predicated on the ISS' 90 minute orbit around a globe earth, so it is somewhat relevant to the shape of the world.
I wrote it could have been occulted by clouds due to an initial misunderstanding of what the OP was stating.

Regardless, the comings and goings of overhead objects circling over our heads isn't based on the shape of the earth. The trackers can predict this just like someone can say what time the sun will appear.

That's not what they're saying. They're saying that trackers and other apps know when it will disappear while above the horizon.
"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens

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Offline Everette Graham

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Re: Visibility of the ISS
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2023, 06:29:22 AM »
Except it doesn't disappear from view in only a select few regions, the ISS disappears from view while above the horizon (when obstructed) everywhere that it appears above the horizon.
You are saying once it disappears from your view, it is also invisible to everyone else?

Come now...

Your horizon isn't everyones' horizon.

Almost. I said once it disappears from view while above the horizon, it disappears for everyone that can see it at that moment. Of course, if you stop seeing the ISS because it goes below the horizon, some other people will still be able to see it depending on their location.
"That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence." - Christopher Hitchens