Apollo 17
« on: November 27, 2022, 09:05:53 AM »
Just incredible how many god damn photos there are from these missions readily available on the internet. All high resolution and beautiful. Even if you think it’s fake, you gotta give them some credit.
You just keep scrolling and scrolling and the pictures keep going.

The link: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a17/images17.html




« Last Edit: November 27, 2022, 09:13:54 AM by secretagent10 »

Offline GoldCashew

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2022, 04:31:52 PM »
Just incredible how many god damn photos there are from these missions readily available on the internet. All high resolution and beautiful. Even if you think it’s fake, you gotta give them some credit.
You just keep scrolling and scrolling and the pictures keep going.

The link: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a17/images17.html








My grandfather (father's side) was born in 1893 and was a late bloomer in terms of when he got married and had kids. I can only imagine the excitement he experienced throughout his years in terms of innovations in flight; from first powered flight, to WWI piston powered aircraft, to WWII warbirds and civilian aircraft, to the jet age and stealth technology, and to the first Moon landing.

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2022, 05:03:47 PM »
I was privileged to be born in the 1950s.  I still remember my mum listening to the radio and telling me that there was a man in space (Yuri Gagarin), and I was old enough in the later 60s to witness, and understand the significance of, the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs culminating in the Lunar landings. 

In Earth orbit we have had Skylab, Mir, Shuttle, ISS, constellations of communications-, broadcasting- and navigational-satellites.  Beyond Earth's immediate locale, we have landed or flown-by all the major planets, some asteroids, and a comet.  Robotic probes are excavating material from some bodies for future return to Earth.  Half a dozen countries, of all political shadings, have soft-landed vehicles on alien bodies, and some of them are still driving around.  We've sent probes beyond the boundaries of the Solar system, and spaceborne telescopes are probing the furthest reaches of the universe.   

The prototype of a manned lunar probe is currently orbiting the moon; the first person-capable vehicle to do so in 50 years, and we stand on the threshold of permanent lunar settlements, and a manned probe to Mars.  Possibly, inshallah, in my lifetime. 

Against this backdrop, someone on another thread (who's name I can't even be arsed to look up again) is suggesting that space is boring.  Unbelievable.  Makes you wonder where we will be in another 50 years. 


Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2022, 06:15:41 PM »
There hasn’t been a man on the moon in my lifetime but I love all this stuff. When I was a kid my dad had a model of a Saturn V rocket, he had an atlas of the moon and I think he had one of Mars. Used to love all that stuff. I was a big fan of the Shuttle programme, dad and me were a lucky enough to see one launch on a trip to Florida. Very lucky actually, it was due to go up before we even arrived in the States but was postponed for some reason. We visited the Kennedy Space Centre on the same holiday and saw a real Saturn V rocket there. Holy shit that thing is big. I’ve seen the piece of moon rock that the US gave the UK too.
The thought that we will visit the moon again while I’m alive makes me slightly giddy with excitement. I grew up with books about the future full of moon bases. Didn’t quite work out like that but some of the other developments like the ISS are arguably equally exciting.
Tom: "Claiming incredulity is a pretty bad argument. Calling it "insane" or "ridiculous" is not a good argument at all."

TFES Wiki Occam's Razor page, by Tom: "What's the simplest explanation; that NASA has successfully designed and invented never before seen rocket technologies from scratch which can accelerate 100 tons of matter to an escape velocity of 7 miles per second"

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2022, 06:23:09 PM »
Against this backdrop, someone on another thread (who's name I can't even be arsed to look up again) is suggesting that space is boring.  Unbelievable.  Makes you wonder where we will be in another 50 years.

I believe it was this:
Space, as we are told, is a vast expanse of boring nothingness. But once you stop believing in it your mind opens up to all sorts of wonders that get ignited by pictures like this.

The stuff we get to see is breathtakingly beautiful- and that’s just what we’ve already found. I don’t know how people don’t see how amazing it all is.
Direct imaging of Pluto, the vibrant colors that Saturn’s rings cast across Saturn, photos of Enceladus and Europa, the Apollo footage, the shuttle launches, Jupiter’s colorful clouds, Titan where you could literally fly by flapping your arms, the thousands of clear images of the deserts of Mars, I could go on forever. How could anyone think it’s “boring”?
That’s why I posted this, the Apollo 17 image archive is absolutely enormous and each image is a treat.

I genuinely believe most people that don’t believe in the moon landing simply aren’t aware of the massive volume of photos, videos, engineering works, etc.

Saying space is boring because most of it is empty is like saying Earth is boring because most of it is rock.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2022, 06:32:35 PM by secretagent10 »

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2022, 06:26:12 PM »
Used to love all that stuff. I was a big fan of the Shuttle programme, dad and me were a lucky enough to see one launch on a trip to Florida. Very lucky actually, it was due to go up before we even arrived in the States but was postponed for some reason.

One of my biggest regrets is never seeing a shuttle launch. Still the most beautiful spaceship I’ve ever seen. I plan on visiting Atlantis at the KSC soon.

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2022, 07:29:41 PM »
Used to love all that stuff. I was a big fan of the Shuttle programme, dad and me were a lucky enough to see one launch on a trip to Florida. Very lucky actually, it was due to go up before we even arrived in the States but was postponed for some reason.

One of my biggest regrets is never seeing a shuttle launch. Still the most beautiful spaceship I’ve ever seen. I plan on visiting Atlantis at the KSC soon.
On another trip I had tickets for a launch. The one I saw we just parked up miles away, it was spectacular but the tickets we had this other time were as close as the general public can get. And it was a night launch. I was very excited. The way it was sold to us we would be picked up by a coach, taken to the Kennedy Space Centre, have time to look around and then be taken to the place where you watched the launch from.

What actually happened was we only had about 45 minutes to look around by the time we got there, we waited for hours at the viewing point in the middle of the night (and it was a very cold night, for Florida). And then the launch was scrubbed. So I spent a lot of money, missed a night’s sleep, got cold and then didn’t see anything anyway :(.
But at least I saw that other launch. It was spectacular. It went up right at the end of the launch window, because of the distance we saw it well before we heard it. When we did there was this deep rumble like a subway train going under your feet.

Oh, and all the arguments I’ve seen from moon conspiracy theorists are a combination of incredulity and ignorance.
Tom: "Claiming incredulity is a pretty bad argument. Calling it "insane" or "ridiculous" is not a good argument at all."

TFES Wiki Occam's Razor page, by Tom: "What's the simplest explanation; that NASA has successfully designed and invented never before seen rocket technologies from scratch which can accelerate 100 tons of matter to an escape velocity of 7 miles per second"

Offline GoldCashew

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2022, 08:40:14 PM »
My father had done some consultation work for NASA with respect to the development of the TESS satellite (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite).

When it launched in the spring of 2018, we received VIP passes to go see the launch from the VIP Kennedy Space Center viewing area. On the way to the area, the ground shuttle took us on a tour of the launch complex facility, including the tracks where the large caterpillar movers travel.

It was an experience I will never forget, including the loud rumble and crackle of the SpaceX rocket that took TESS into it's large orbit.

My personal opinion with most Moon hoax believers is that what they are denying isn't necessarily the existence of space travel or perhaps even the Moon landing; I believe most use the denial as a sort of coping mechanism, an in-road to, or avenue to demonstrating their animosity towards or distrust towards anything relating to sources of authority or government agencies.         

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Offline J-Man

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2022, 11:45:20 PM »
Hilarious conversation. We know it never happened. Just like building 7 collapsing in it's own footprint due to office fires or the most secure building in the world had no cameras working.

Yo Ho, Yo Ho, a Pirates life for you.

Have you met the different alien species yet or got a looksie at their warp speed engines in Black Holes? Take pics !
What kind of person would devote endless hours posting scientific facts trying to correct the few retards who believe in the FE? I slay shitty little demons.

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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2022, 12:01:10 AM »
Imagine thinking Building 7 collapsed in its own footprint.
Th*rk is the worst person on this website.

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Offline J-Man

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2022, 12:42:35 AM »
Imagine thinking Building 7 collapsed in its own footprint.

Is that like the big gravity machine in the center of the earth? Russia got 7.5 miles down, how'd you do with those xray vision goggles?
Only a fake 3,955 miles to go...dig it?

Tell me more....
What kind of person would devote endless hours posting scientific facts trying to correct the few retards who believe in the FE? I slay shitty little demons.

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2022, 12:52:03 AM »
Hilarious conversation. We know it never happened.

-Cites nothing. As is common.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2022, 01:26:19 AM by secretagent10 »

Offline GoldCashew

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2022, 01:52:25 AM »
Hilarious conversation. We know it never happened. Just like building 7 collapsing in it's own footprint due to office fires or the most secure building in the world had no cameras working.

Yo Ho, Yo Ho, a Pirates life for you.

Have you met the different alien species yet or got a looksie at their warp speed engines in Black Holes? Take pics !


As is always the case, you never bring the goods in terms of providing evidence.

Instead, your musings always reflect the ramblings of a dim-witted, bible-thumping conspiracy theorist.... and nothing more.

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Offline Rama Set

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2022, 02:13:57 AM »
Imagine thinking Building 7 collapsed in its own footprint.

Is that like the big gravity machine in the center of the earth? Russia got 7.5 miles down, how'd you do with those xray vision goggles?
Only a fake 3,955 miles to go...dig it?

Tell me more....

Try again. This time in your native language.
Th*rk is the worst person on this website.

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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2022, 04:28:47 PM »
Just happened to be channel surfing last week and ran across the Discovery channel show Apollo: The Forgotten Films.  It's a great look at Apollo 11 for anyone interested.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

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Offline markjo

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2022, 09:56:06 PM »
I kinda like some of the more technical documentaries like America's Secret Space Heroes or Moon Machines that go into a fair bit of detail on some of the engineering challenges that went into the various systems, like the command module, the lunar module and the space suits.  It gives you a better appreciation of the scale of the effort that The ConspiracyTM had to go to in order to create such a convincing series of fake missions.
Abandon hope all ye who press enter here.

Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge. -- Charles Darwin

If you can't demonstrate it, then you shouldn't believe it.

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Offline GoldCashew

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Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2022, 12:18:34 AM »
I kinda like some of the more technical documentaries like America's Secret Space Heroes or Moon Machines that go into a fair bit of detail on some of the engineering challenges that went into the various systems, like the command module, the lunar module and the space suits.  It gives you a better appreciation of the scale of the effort that The ConspiracyTM had to go to in order to create such a convincing series of fake missions.


Periscope Films on YouTube has some of the best and most comprehensive documentaries on topics ranging from skunk-works X-Planes to the NASA Apollo program.

One of my favorites is the documentary of how they built the Kennedy Space Center from start to finish.

If you haven't seen Periscope films yet than it's well worth it.

Re: Apollo 17
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2022, 08:52:19 AM »
I'd recommend "A Man on The Moon" by Andrew Chaikin.
It's a great book which goes in to a lot of detail about the Apollo missions but also the Mercury and Gemini programmes which preceded them. How the astronauts were recruited and so on.
Tom: "Claiming incredulity is a pretty bad argument. Calling it "insane" or "ridiculous" is not a good argument at all."

TFES Wiki Occam's Razor page, by Tom: "What's the simplest explanation; that NASA has successfully designed and invented never before seen rocket technologies from scratch which can accelerate 100 tons of matter to an escape velocity of 7 miles per second"