Your map is wrong.
« on: January 27, 2018, 07:20:00 PM »
Since Flat Earth people are so interested in using what they can observe in order to prove what's going on, let's get on some hypothetical flights around the world.

According to your map on your Wikipedia, a flight from Santiago, Chile to Auckland, New Zealand should take a really long time. Using Expedia (use whatever site you want, it doesn't matter), if you travel from Santiago to Auckland it's about a 13 hour flight. That's a long time to sit on your butt, but it's not as long a flight as going from say, Anchorage, Alaska to Helsinki, Finland!  That's a 14 hour flight, according to Expedia.

So, how is it, Flat Earthers, that traveling from Santiago to Auckland is an hour longer then traveling from Anchorage to Helsinki?  According to your map, Anchorage to Helsinki should be a very short flight - just right over the arctic. Maybe a few hours at most.

Furthermore, if your map was right, and you traveled from Santiago to Sydney (on the southern coast of Australia), you should in theory see land most of the way there, but that's not what you'd see at all - it would mostly be ocean, and it would land in Auckland, and the connect to the Australia mainland.

In fact, if you go to https://flightaware.com/live/ you can see flights around the world as they happen. I'm looking at one right now that left Santiago and is flying to Melbourne directly. And it has this hugely curved flight path. Why would the flight path be curved?  That makes no sense. If the Earth was flat, this flight path would be a straight line. The airlines aren't interested in wasting gas, and wasting everyone's time.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2018, 05:49:08 PM »
If I had to guess, their answer would be that airlines are in on the conspiracy. Which obviously doesn't make any sense, but there isn't much here that does.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2018, 06:17:24 PM »
If I had to guess, their answer would be that airlines are in on the conspiracy. Which obviously doesn't make any sense, but there isn't much here that does.
No, their answer would be that they don't have a map, so why are you attempting to evaluate distances based on the non-existent map?
In addition (alternatively for some, not at all for others) how do you know what these flights see? Have you traveled on them?

Offline Scroogie

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2018, 04:10:34 AM »

No, their answer would be that they don't have a map, so why are you attempting to evaluate distances based on the non-existent map?

Indeed, they don't. Sadly, a couple of months ago I pointed out to the flerfers that they could easily create their map - all the requisite data is both extant and readily available - but said map has yet to materialize.  That map alone would do wonders for their credibility while simultaneously quieting many of us disbelievers.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2018, 04:21:39 PM »
Since Flat Earth people are so interested in using what they can observe in order to prove what's going on, let's get on some hypothetical flights around the world.

According to your map on your Wikipedia, a flight from Santiago, Chile to Auckland, New Zealand should take a really long time. Using Expedia (use whatever site you want, it doesn't matter), if you travel from Santiago to Auckland it's about a 13 hour flight. That's a long time to sit on your butt, but it's not as long a flight as going from say, Anchorage, Alaska to Helsinki, Finland!  That's a 14 hour flight, according to Expedia.

So, how is it, Flat Earthers, that traveling from Santiago to Auckland is an hour longer then traveling from Anchorage to Helsinki?  According to your map, Anchorage to Helsinki should be a very short flight - just right over the arctic. Maybe a few hours at most.

Furthermore, if your map was right, and you traveled from Santiago to Sydney (on the southern coast of Australia), you should in theory see land most of the way there, but that's not what you'd see at all - it would mostly be ocean, and it would land in Auckland, and the connect to the Australia mainland.

In fact, if you go to https://flightaware.com/live/ you can see flights around the world as they happen. I'm looking at one right now that left Santiago and is flying to Melbourne directly. And it has this hugely curved flight path. Why would the flight path be curved?  That makes no sense. If the Earth was flat, this flight path would be a straight line. The airlines aren't interested in wasting gas, and wasting everyone's time.
First challenge I make to this post is I doubt you were able to see any flight on flightaware that was taking place south of the Equator.

If you actually were seeing it, then investigators into MH370 would have simply popped that software up and found the plane right away.

Fact is, plane travel SOUTH of the Equator is virtually untrackable, even today. Reported routes are nowhere near reality.

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Offline xenotolerance

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2018, 04:56:04 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2018, 05:08:54 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
Because (as discussed in other threads) flight tracking in the Southern Hemisphere relies mostly on GPS/Sats (which don't/can't exist in most FEH) and not so much ground based telemetry. This is presuming they actually are tracking the flight as it moves across the ocean. Some (not all, not even sure on most) appear to simply sort of 'guess' where the flight is instead of using any data from something. They base the statement about reported routes and such on a small handful of anecdotes.

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Offline nickrulercreator

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2018, 05:11:54 PM »
First challenge I make to this post is I doubt you were able to see any flight on flightaware that was taking place south of the Equator.

If you actually were seeing it, then investigators into MH370 would have simply popped that software up and found the plane right away.

Fact is, plane travel SOUTH of the Equator is virtually untrackable, even today. Reported routes are nowhere near reality.

baba booey
anotha one
maybe the third time's the charm
have i made my point yet
This end should point toward the ground if you want to go to space. If it starts pointing toward space you are having a bad problem and you will not go to space today.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2018, 05:23:18 PM »
First challenge I make to this post is I doubt you were able to see any flight on flightaware that was taking place south of the Equator.

If you actually were seeing it, then investigators into MH370 would have simply popped that software up and found the plane right away.

Fact is, plane travel SOUTH of the Equator is virtually untrackable, even today. Reported routes are nowhere near reality.

baba booey
anotha one
maybe the third time's the charm
have i made my point yet
So you want to spam the forum with flight tracking apps that are not capable of tracking southern hemiplane flights?

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2018, 05:24:32 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 09:10:30 PM by totallackey »

Offline Scroogie

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2018, 11:21:43 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?

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Offline nickrulercreator

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2018, 03:11:14 AM »
So you want to spam the forum with flight tracking apps that are not capable of tracking southern hemiplane flights?

Did you... did you look at the sites? They were tracking at least a few dozen flights below the equator, meaning they were in the southern hemisphere.
This end should point toward the ground if you want to go to space. If it starts pointing toward space you are having a bad problem and you will not go to space today.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2018, 12:30:04 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
How many planes go missing in the Northern Hemiplane...

Hmmmm?

I can recall ZERO...does not mean there has not been any instance, but the last two missing flights I can recall took place in the Southern Hemiplane...

That is why the issue of flight tracking is related...

Offline StinkyOne

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2018, 01:11:17 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
How many planes go missing in the Northern Hemiplane...

Hmmmm?

I can recall ZERO...does not mean there has not been any instance, but the last two missing flights I can recall took place in the Southern Hemiplane...

That is why the issue of flight tracking is related...

Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
I saw a video where a pilot was flying above the sun.
-Terry50

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2018, 02:04:38 PM »
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
OP did write about a direct flight from Santiago to Melbourne, and you can just scroll down to look at South America's flights...

How do you figure that the equator marks a magic line past which planes become untrackable?
You all just want to ignore MH370, uh...?

OK, so an airplane disappeared. They disappear in both hemispheres. AAMOF, more disappear in the northern than the southern hemisphere. Why? because there are more flights in the northern hemisphere and statistics dictate that it be so.

Now what, exactly, does this have to do with flight tracking in the southern hemisphere?
How many planes go missing in the Northern Hemiplane...

Hmmmm?

I can recall ZERO...does not mean there has not been any instance, but the last two missing flights I can recall took place in the Southern Hemiplane...

That is why the issue of flight tracking is related...
The Malaysia flight was unique because of the size of the aircraft, and difficulty in finding it with vanishing over an ocean. Not to mention the number of flights that go missing now is incredibly small. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_missing_aircraft Not only do some of these occur in the Northern hemisphere, but a couple of them occur in flights that take place over land for the majority of the journey.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2018, 03:58:08 PM »
Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
No, the proof that we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is the fact we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane.

There is no documented evidence a flight in the Southern Hemisplane has ever been completely tracked from poit of origin to destination utilizing any software/interface.

The reason we cannot accurately track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is precisely due to the vast expanse of ocean (cost of technology, relative dearth of flights in the region, etc.)

So you want to spam the forum with flight tracking apps that are not capable of tracking southern hemiplane flights?
Did you... did you look at the sites? They were tracking at least a few dozen flights below the equator, meaning they were in the southern hemisphere.
Of course you will se a red line (or whatever indicator of a plane is utilized) at some point on the monitor, but that will invariably drop from the screen as the flight is lost during the day.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 04:00:02 PM by totallackey »

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2018, 04:24:20 PM »
Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
No, the proof that we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is the fact we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane.

There is no documented evidence a flight in the Southern Hemisplane has ever been completely tracked from poit of origin to destination utilizing any software/interface.

The reason we cannot accurately track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is precisely due to the vast expanse of ocean (cost of technology, relative dearth of flights in the region, etc.)

So you want to spam the forum with flight tracking apps that are not capable of tracking southern hemiplane flights?
Did you... did you look at the sites? They were tracking at least a few dozen flights below the equator, meaning they were in the southern hemisphere.
Of course you will se a red line (or whatever indicator of a plane is utilized) at some point on the monitor, but that will invariably drop from the screen as the flight is lost during the day.
Look at flights across Australia.  Satellite based ADS will help your investigations when it is avàilable.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2018, 04:45:48 PM »
Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
No, the proof that we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is the fact we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane.

There is no documented evidence a flight in the Southern Hemisplane has ever been completely tracked from poit of origin to destination utilizing any software/interface.

The reason we cannot accurately track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is precisely due to the vast expanse of ocean (cost of technology, relative dearth of flights in the region, etc.)

So you want to spam the forum with flight tracking apps that are not capable of tracking southern hemiplane flights?
Did you... did you look at the sites? They were tracking at least a few dozen flights below the equator, meaning they were in the southern hemisphere.
Of course you will se a red line (or whatever indicator of a plane is utilized) at some point on the monitor, but that will invariably drop from the screen as the flight is lost during the day.

Radar facilities are based on land, and each one has a range of about 200 miles (320 kilometers). So passenger jets on transoceanic flights do go off the radar map for a period of time — but that doesn't mean nobody's keeping tabs on them. The flight crews use combinations of high-frequency (HF) radio, satellite-based voice communication and text-data networks to report to ATC [air traffic control] the exact time, position and flight level when the crossing begins. They then update ATC with voice or text progress reports at defined geographic locations and time intervals. Airlines file flight plans, and airplanes are expected to arrive at certain points by certain times. When an airplane crew fails to check in at its next checkpoint, that is when an alarm is raised. This case is an extremely rare event, especially with the highly technologically advanced aircraft in the air today.

(Source: Livescience.com)

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Offline nickrulercreator

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Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2018, 04:56:40 PM »
Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
No, the proof that we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is the fact we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane.

There is no documented evidence a flight in the Southern Hemisplane has ever been completely tracked from poit of origin to destination utilizing any software/interface.

The reason we cannot accurately track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is precisely due to the vast expanse of ocean (cost of technology, relative dearth of flights in the region, etc.)

Of course you will se a red line (or whatever indicator of a plane is utilized) at some point on the monitor, but that will invariably drop from the screen as the flight is lost during the day.

Total, I linked 4 websites that show every flight on Earth that is able to be tracked. Many were in the southern hemisphere. Any of them can be watched. Some pop up as they take off. Then some disappear as they land.

At no point have I ever seen a red line, or any flight go randomly missing in the southern hemisphere on the tracker.
This end should point toward the ground if you want to go to space. If it starts pointing toward space you are having a bad problem and you will not go to space today.

Re: Your map is wrong.
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2018, 05:24:28 PM »
Two flights go missing in the southern hemisphere and it is proof we can't track flights? I guess the thousands of successful flights were just luck. I'm sure it also has nothing to do with the fact that the southern hemisphere has a far larger ratio of water to land than the northern...
No, the proof that we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is the fact we cannot track flights in the Southern Hemisplane.

There is no documented evidence a flight in the Southern Hemisplane has ever been completely tracked from poit of origin to destination utilizing any software/interface.

The reason we cannot accurately track flights in the Southern Hemisplane is precisely due to the vast expanse of ocean (cost of technology, relative dearth of flights in the region, etc.)

Of course you will se a red line (or whatever indicator of a plane is utilized) at some point on the monitor, but that will invariably drop from the screen as the flight is lost during the day.

Total, I linked 4 websites that show every flight on Earth that is able to be tracked. Many were in the southern hemisphere. Any of them can be watched. Some pop up as they take off. Then some disappear as they land.

At no point have I ever seen a red line, or any flight go randomly missing in the southern hemisphere on the tracker.
Well, you have not watched them for any sustained length of time. It is a relatively frequent occurence.